Moralizing Against “Vile Games” in U.K.

In the wake of the Byron Review, Telegraph columnist Jenny McCartney writes about what she sees as a lack of morality in violent video games:

Dr Byron seems a sensible woman, and no doubt she has done her best to contain the spread of some of the more obnoxious material on offer without incurring the ire of the games lobby. But one of her remarks in an interview last week struck me as particularly, and depressingly, modern. “My review is not about making any kind of moral pronouncements,” she said, “although I do think that it is important to look at the desensitisation to violence.”

…The word “moral” still has deeply unfashionable associations with… the “moral majority” protesting against the “tide of filth” in books and television in the US. How tame and inoffensive that tide looks now.

Yet the truth, surely, is that the majority of us would indeed recoil from the idea that our teenage son or daughter was upstairs playing Manhunt 2… It is insidiously corrupting to their view of themselves and other people… Perhaps if more people, including teenagers, were prepared to voice moral objections to this toxic stuff, it would no longer be possible to lampoon them for caring.

Meanwhile, the Daily Mail asked British TV personality Anne Diamond (left) to render her opinion on some popular, violent games. Not surprisingly, Diamond issued a beatdown::

After seeing them Anne said: “Just reviewing these games, made my hair stand on end. I have never got into computer games.but my sons all love them.

“I have to guard constantly that they don’t use my ignorance to play games that I wouldn’t allow in the house, if only I knew their content.

“Some of the games were so mindless it would be hard to see them as a destructive influence. But others were sickening in their gratuitous use of violence and bloodthirsty imagery.”

Her comments include:

Call of Duty 4: Perhaps it might beĀ OK for older teenage boys, but only in small doses.

GP: “Older teenage boys” can join the real British Army and be shipped to Afghanistan. But it’s best to limit their COD4?

Resident Evil 4: This game shouldn’t be allowed to be sold, even to adults… when I played I was stabbed to death with pitchforks amid fountains of my own blood. This kind of violence can only be bad for you.

GP: News flash, Anne. Everybody who plays this game at one time or another gets stabbed to death with pitchforks amid fountains of their own blood. But it’s virtual blood. It’s a game. Are you suggesting that zombie movies be banned, as well?

GP: The link on the Jenny McCartney column was sent in by our old pal Jack Thompson, in between threats to sue us.

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