Texas Guv Dishes on Today’s E3 Keynote

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who will deliver today’s keynote address at E3 in Los Angeles, explains his decision to appear in a guest column for the San Antonio Express-News:

…Although high resolution graphics, new storylines and technological advancements will grab most of the headlines coming out of [E3], I would encourage a closer look at the real story: the emergence of a bonafide economic engine…

 

Seemingly overnight, the video game industry has become a major player, with over $18.8 billion in U.S. sales last year. The industry in Texas has kept pace with the national trend… it is clear the computer and video game industry is on fire… To help further encourage the industry… Texas has instituted measures that offer qualifying video game developers financial incentives similar to those offered to the film industry…

 

In barely more than a generation, video games have transformed a diversion for the few into a mass medium. The notion that gaming is confined to adolescent males is long outdated. Recent research has shown that the average video game player is 35 and that 40 percent of gamers are women.

 

Today, games help people of all ages to live, learn, work and, of course, play… There are those who might see only gloom and doom in our national economy. We should look to sectors like the video game industry that have embraced the notion of global competition and follow their example to greater prosperity.

 

GP: This is probably the first time we’ve seen such a public expression of support for the game biz from a major political figure. GamePolitics will be live-blogging the Guv’s keynote which begins at 9:15 PST.

We’ll also be live-blogging ESA boss Michael Gallagher’s state-of-the-industry speech at 1:15 PST.

To follow those live reports, jump over to Twitter and follow GamePolitics

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47 comments

  1. 0
    oto kirlama says:

    I’m all for freedom of ttnet vitamin speech and allowing rent a car game makers to put whatever they want in games, but there’s one thing about this app that has me scratching my head.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but from araç kiralama the previous article araba kiralama on this I gathered that players can use Google maps in-game to find the other (real-life?) dealers in their area.  If this is the case, has travesti anyone considered what’s stopping someone from using this app to actually move drugs between hands for reals?

    But majority araba kiralama of their outrage araç kiralama stems from what it could DO TO children, not the content itself.  Talk to one of these people and you’ll find they don’t think any books kiralık araba should be banned from children.  Mention American Psycho and they talk about kiralık araç the redeeming value of using imagination to construct a story.  Reading, no matter what the content, is largely viewed as a consequenceless activity for people of any age.  The reason why I mention American Psycho is because of the content itself.  Gaming never has and likely never will have any scenes where someone has sex with a severed head.  Not gonna happen.  Yet despite this, they’ll fight tooth and nail to protect their children from two boys kissing in Bully but whatever they read is harmless… yeah.

    The entire arguement is kiralık oto based upon a social normality inflicted by luddites who can’t figure out the controls for Halo so it’s frightening and terrifying and obviously the cause of youth violence on the rise even though, in reality, it’s in decline (which is actually a HUGE suprise given minibüs kiralama the economies status).  In  a perfect world, we would have parents that actually parent.  The idea of sales restrictions on media on oto kiralama any form to accomidate parental unwillingness to get involved with their child’s life is the real problem to me.  Here I am, 32 years old, and being held up at a self-scan rent a car needing to show ID before I can buy a $10 M rated game all because Soccer Momthra can’t be bothered to look at the crap Billy Genericallystupidson does in his free time.  It’s too hard for her, so I have to suffer?

  2. 0
    oto kirlama says:

    I’m all for freedom of ttnet vitamin speech and allowing rent a car game makers to put whatever they want in games, but there’s one thing about this app that has me scratching my head.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but from araç kiralama the previous article araba kiralama on this I gathered that players can use Google maps in-game to find the other (real-life?) dealers in their area.  If this is the case, has travesti anyone considered what’s stopping someone from using this app to actually move drugs between hands for reals?

    But majority araba kiralama of their outrage araç kiralama stems from what it could DO TO children, not the content itself.  Talk to one of these people and you’ll find they don’t think any books kiralık araba should be banned from children.  Mention American Psycho and they talk about kiralık araç the redeeming value of using imagination to construct a story.  Reading, no matter what the content, is largely viewed as a consequenceless activity for people of any age.  The reason why I mention American Psycho is because of the content itself.  Gaming never has and likely never will have any scenes where someone has sex with a severed head.  Not gonna happen.  Yet despite this, they’ll fight tooth and nail to protect their children from two boys kissing in Bully but whatever they read is harmless… yeah.

    The entire arguement is kiralık oto based upon a social normality inflicted by luddites who can’t figure out the controls for Halo so it’s frightening and terrifying and obviously the cause of youth violence on the rise even though, in reality, it’s in decline (which is actually a HUGE suprise given minibüs kiralama the economies status).  In  a perfect world, we would have parents that actually parent.  The idea of sales restrictions on media on oto kiralama any form to accomidate parental unwillingness to get involved with their child’s life is the real problem to me.  Here I am, 32 years old, and being held up at a self-scan rent a car needing to show ID before I can buy a $10 M rated game all because Soccer Momthra can’t be bothered to look at the crap Billy Genericallystupidson does in his free time.  It’s too hard for her, so I have to suffer?

  3. 0
    TBoneTony ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Great speach from a politician, but still I don’t trust them.

    If it is not for the money, then they are in it for the protection of children.

    I would love for a Gamer to be a Politician and offer tax breaks to game developers WITHOUT all those content restrictions…

    But for the first time a Government person to talk to game developers without trying to talk about “Protecting the Children” is one of the first positive signs that will hopefully come more of into the future.

  4. 0
    Black Dragon says:

    Okay, fine, that’s a fair assertion.

    Of course, tilting the playing field to encourage certain things and discourage others is a legislator’s JOB.

    So long as they try to steer free speech with the carrot (tax breaks) instead of the stick (censorship and boycotts), I’m perfectly satisfied.

  5. 0
    Verbinator ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I support a government’s right to choose.

    In this case it is MY MONEY they are spending. I support this program to expand the game development base in Texas and to promote a diversity of game types. As a professional game developer living and working in Texas and the parent of a professional game developer living in Texas I see this as a great opportunity to promote a diversity of gameplay types coming out of our state. 

    We’ve got plenty of successful game companies here making mature-content games. If this money helps fund another developer like Mumbo Jumbo or Spider Monk (who just released Roogoo), then I’m all for it.

  6. 0
    chadachada(123) says:

    Is anything that’s simulated in a video game illegal? I mean if they included actual pictures or footage maybe, but what could they put otherwise that could possibly be illegal?

  7. 0
    Anonymous says:

    "Choosing to make it a suppression of free speech issue is one way to make sure that no one gets a tax break for any type of game development."

    Nonsense. There’s absolutely no reason why tax breaks can’t be given to the game industry as a whole, without regard for content (except, of course, for illegal content).

  8. 0
    Father Time says:

    It’s their money they can do with it what they wish. Does this in anyway impede on people’s accsess to violent video games? No.

    The Texas government is not responsible for whether or not the violent video game market grows or dwindles. Yes they are promoting nonviolent speech with public funds and the only way you would really have a legitimate complaint is if you lived in Texas (and even then it would be a matter of ‘what does the majority think’ if enough people really cared).

  9. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I’m not going to let you redefine the scope of my original statements. I say that tax breaks may be given to an industry without discriminating against particular companies based on the content they produce.  This applies to any company that makes any kind of product, including media.

  10. 0
    Anonymous says:

    How about: No content-based tax breaks.

    If the government wants to promote particular messages through the use of public funds, let them commision specific works rather than give tax advantages to those who make the kinds of games the government wants them to make. I have no problem with tax breaks that promote economic growth, but tax breaks that promote particular kinds of content are no good.

    You say my position amounts to "no tax breaks are better than some tax breaks", and call me retarded. What’s retarded is your own failure to recognize the difference between "no content-based tax breaks" and "no tax breaks at all". "No content-based tax breaks" is consistent with the notion that "some tax breaks" are good, and it in no way implies "no tax breaks" are better than some.

  11. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    The problem with that line of thinking is that if it weren’t for these restrictions, there likely wouldn’t be any tax breaks at all. So the effective message is "no tax breaks are better than some tax breaks". It’s bald facedly retarded thinking. Somehow a tax break ceases to be a tax break when the patron fails to submit unconditionaly to the recipient?

  12. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Another way to look at it is that people who make certain kinds of games have to pay higher taxes than other game companies. It’s not about entitlement, but about an uneven playing field based on the kind of speech you promote.

  13. 0
    Verbinator ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Three words about everyone getting their panties in a bunch over "content restrictions": Get. Over. It. 

    When a client or patron pays for something, they get to have a say in what goes into it. It’s been that way since forever, not just games.

    Don’t want restrictions? Don’t stick your entitlement-grubbing paw out for free government money.

  14. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    Yes, it’s absolutely horrible isn’t it? You either have to follow content guidelines or follow the same tax codes as any other business. It’s absolutely unfair that video games get any kind of special treatment that requires special conditions to recieve it.

  15. 0
    Erik ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Get over it?  Not exactly.  Rather the industry should tell Texas to shove their tax incentives up their ass.  And that includes even companies whose games are rated E and would qualify for the tax break.  I’d rather see no tax breaks at all rather than the government pushing its agenda.

     

    And why shouldn’t people try to squeeze the government for every dime they can get out of it?  They do it to us.

  16. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    The fact that there are content restrictions is an indication that tax breaks without content restrictions are unlikely. Thus, if not for the restrictions, there wouldn’t be tax breaks for game companies. Plus, THE BEGGAR DOES NOT DECIDE THE TERMS ON WHICH HIS MONEY IS RECEIVED. Nobody is punished. NOBODY. There are not greater taxes on game businesses who do not want to follow the guidlines. They have to follow the same taxes as everybody else.

  17. 0
    Verbinator ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Tax law is usually designed to encourage behavior that the government find beneficial to either A) the government, or B) the general well-being of the populace (order of listing intentional).

    The tax law is designed to increase the number of developers making games in Texas (improving the economy for all citizens) and satisfy the concerns of the citizens/voters of the state who are by majority, generally speaking, conservative.

    The government of Texas wants to encourage development of games acceptable to the MAJORITY of people paying the bills and uses the tax break as a way of doing so. Publicly or even privately funded art, speech, etc. should be acceptable to the people paying the bills.

    Choosing to make it a suppression of free speech issue is one way to make sure that no one gets a tax break for any type of game development. 

     

  18. 0
    Anonymous says:

    There are tax breaks for particular industries, which aren’t based at all on content. Your assertion that tax breaks without content restrictions are unlikely is therefore quite false.

  19. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Haha yea. Damn GP for doing it’s best to be legit. 😛

    I can’t wait till Gallagher leaves office and stops doing horrible damage to ESA and E3.

  20. 0
    GRIZZAM PRIME says:

    They’d cry "anti-ESA vitriol!!!!!"

     

    -Entertainment isn’t the reason the world sucks. It’s the reason we know the world sucks. For information on games and psychology, look up: Jonathan Freedman(2002)Block & Crain(2007)Grand Theft Childhood, by Harvard researchers Larry Kutner&Cheryl Olson

  21. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Hopefully GP will write something later as I think there was a couple noteworthy things that Gamespot picked up on. Gov. Perry has less than 50 people show up to his event (in a room that sits more than 1K) and Gallagher had a similar weak drawing. I know these are star studded people, but if your big name can only get 50 people, then something is seriously wrong.

    Btw, can someone photoshop new Gallagher’s face to the old Gallagher smashing a watermelon or something? I think that should be GP’s new go to photo for anything Gallagher.

  22. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    I would bet that he’ll be harping on that trans-Texas corridor he’s been trying to get going. He still isn’t having any luck with that pet project.

  23. 0
    thefremen says:

     He’ll gladly accept money from the PTC to speak at a dinner about the horrible evils of video games and how they’re destroying America’s youth.

  24. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    How is it censorship when no one is punished? Family games are encouraged, but no additional penalties were levied on violent game makers. So violent game makers pay the same Texas taxes they’ve been paying and family game makers get reduced taxes. Allowing people to continue along the same course they’ve been on is now censorship?

  25. 0
    Vinzent ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    So he decided to go with the pandering route. "Hey we’re all buddies!" "Hey, Texas is a leader in the industry, and I’m the leader of Texas!" But he won’t mention Texas’s avid attempts to censor our games with a "We don’t like what you do so no state subsidies for you." – law.

    <sarcasm> Oh but he’s our best buddy, so those must be malicious lies. </sarcasm>

  26. 0
    Krono says:

    I second the inquiry/request about a comprehensive report. I don’t use twitter, but I am curious to see if what the governer had to say justified the otherwise seemingly random choice.

    Sure he isn’t going to be bashing games and gamers in the keynote of a game industry event, but that just has me curious as to what he does have to say.

    -Gray17

  27. 0
    nighstalker160 says:

    "I can’t twitter at work"

    You disgust me you sick son of a…

    It’s refreshing to see someone not slam the industry.  Hopefully this is the beginning of a trend.  Maybe once politicians realize video games are some cottage industry that can be bullied into submission they’ll shut up about how horrible the industry is.

     

  28. 0
    Ravenhawk ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Another vote for a comprehensive report at the the end here.

    I have twitter, but I prefer my news in full article format as opposed to 140 word clips. Just reads cleaner.

  29. 0
    Azhrarn says:

    That’s indeed what it is all about, and always has been.

    And lets not forget that to get those texan tax perks you do need to follow their content guidelines, or you won’t get the tax cut.

  30. 0
    BluePariah says:

    It’s all about morals and the "chillren" until you can slap $18.8 billion down on the table. Lobbying FTW. Anyone know how much money this guy got from EA for his next campaign? Politicians for sale. Low, Low prices.

  31. 0
    Ravenhawk ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    If you give a bonus to one group you are handing them an advantage. You are therefore putting those who aren’t in that group at a disadvantage relatively. It’s not that complicated of a concept. It’s just like any other product-specific subsidy.

  32. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    It doesn’t matter here, because the "disadvantage" is that violent game companies have to pay the same taxes that they have for years. Calling it censorship is just stupid. This is incentive, yes, but it doesn’t discourage violent game companies already in Texas, merely helps out family game companies. If a company could survive with the previous taxes, then it can still survive. Will this boost the Texas video game industry as much as a full tax break? No. Does it stunt anybody? No. Censorship needs to be coupled with negative action toward the producers of the offending speech. Because the tax break does not come coupled with a tax hike, this negative action is absent. Besides, as noted above tax breaks are unlikely without content preconditions. Movies, the closest equivalent to the games industry, has them on their tax break too.

    And let’s say that this is a legitimate free speech violation. If you take this to court, and win, then the tax breaks will be considered unconstitutional as a whole. The courts cannot say that this or that part of a law is the only part that is unconstitutional. Then nobody gets anything.

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