Gamers Vent Spore DRM Frustrations via Amazon.com Reviews

Frustrated Spore users are slamming Will Wright’s new release with poor, 1-star reviews on Amazon.com.

Of 642 user reviews posted as I write this, 586 are of the 1-star variety, hardly what one would expect for such a hotly-anticipated game. The negative reviews invariably mention the digital rights management (DRM) system built into Spore. This one, posted by Amazon user dwemer22, is fairly typical:

I was EXTREMELY excited about this game… Then I got on Amazon and noticed that a large number of the forums devoted to Spore were complaining of something called "SecuROM." I did a little digging and discovered that SecuROM is a piece of [DRM] software that is installed along with the game to prevent you from installing the game more than three times, in an attempt to combat piracy.

 

I was fine with that. I then read further through the forums and the Wikipedia article and discovered that SecuROM does a number of other things too, including sending mysterious packets of data back to the company from your computer (identity theft, perhaps?), prevents you from using certain programs, such as DVD and CD burners, makes it impossible for you to modify your root drive and, worst of all, will NOT uninstall without the help of a third party application. So I canceled my order…

 

I encourage EVERYBODY to not buy this game until the SecuROM Digital Rights Management is patched out or removed from later releases. On a final note, the SecuROM didn’t do a thing to stop the pirates: the day after it was released in the UK, a pirated copy was to be found on the internet, SecuROM and price free.

 Via: gamesindustry.biz

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226 comments

  1. 0
    Anonymous says:

    EA has fielded countless complaints from paying customers over Securom since they started using it but they continue to inflict it.  They deserve all the flak they’re getting.

  2. 0
    Anonymous says:

    IMO it lives happily in the one-to-rent basket. Like B&W and The Blair Witch Project. You should try it, it has some cool stuff in it, but it sucks. Each of the slices are way too simple.

  3. 0
    Kris O. says:

    Sadly, many games use SecuRom. I picked up a Mahjong game from BestBuy a few weeks ago, for my Mom. I installed it on her laptop, and found out a few minutes later–when I tried to load the game without the CD in the tray–that it uses this DRM. Now I feel horrible for installing a virus on her computer. She doesn’t have a disc for Vista, so I can’t reformat her laptop to fix this error. And since you can’t return software… blah.

  4. 0
    Geryon says:

    That may be true but I seem to recall times that Amazon has pulled legitimate 1 star reviews from products, the example of this I saw was some faux science book I think.  The name escapes me at the moment I may look it up later.

  5. 0
    DraginHikari ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    The problem is that isn’t always true, when you agree to the terms of installion your giving them the legal right ot restrict what you can and can’t do with a piece of software., it isn’t a matter of consumer rights it’s contract rules. 

  6. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Civil disobedience works whenever lots of people figure out that a wrong is being committed.  There’s no universal rule that states that civil disobedience only works when rights are threatened.  Rights are, after all, only an artificial construct based on the society’s view of what is right.

    Anyway, I figure that if I buy something I should be able to do what I want with it, within reason and within the law – that should be my right.  Restricting installs to three times is an abridgment of my rights as a consumer.

  7. 0
    BunchaKneejerks says:

    The Amazon Spore thing is a protest and as you say they are spamming the page with reviews. I’d hardly call it censorship. Its no different than posting on these boards and having your message pulled. Case and point, think of the number of press releases JT has had removed from this site; some may be relevant to the topic at hand, some may not.

     

  8. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    Maxis made the decision to go with EA. They’re a part of the problem too. Besides, EA wants money. You pirate and we’ll be right at square one, where we’ll stay if we don’t work with the producers to find a solution to piracy that doesn’t unduly burden the consumer.

  9. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    We’ll never get to any fair agreement between consumers and producers if we aren’t willing to make sacrifices for it. All that piracy accomplishes is convincing the producers that they have to fight harder against piracy so that people are forced to buy the product, DRM and all. If we willingly refuse to buy or pirate the game, we can legitimately say that we would/will buy the game without the harsh DRM. In this way, we encourage producers without ending in net damage to the consumer and without getting the government involved.

    In short, pirating the game will just continue the battle between consumer and publisher. Refusing to partake in the product at all gives us real bargaining power. Pirating kills any power we have.

  10. 0
    Zen says:

    Well, in light of the fact that I did in fact buy it..I will not feel any remorse on getting a copy to play without having to worry about it.  They got the money from me (for the PC, DS, and even the damn book since my wife likes to use them) so i think I deserve a working, non-screw-me version of the game for the money I paid.  I don’t agree with just stealing it, but I want what is fair for those of us that bought it.  One of the guys I work with admitted that he pirated the game and has no problems.  That just PISSES me off to no end.  And that was my rant…I feel better now

  11. 0
    chadachada(123) says:

    Because many of the people that played Bioshock played it on the 360. With Spore, there is no such other option (which I would choose in a heartbeat), making it quite noticable.

  12. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    if you have or make an EA.com account you can use the "contact us" button to send feedback/comments as one of the options IIRC.

    now if anyone gets those comments… i don’t know.

  13. 0
    Serrenity ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I actually just sent an email to the Director of the spore project from the EA games home page, under contact us!  However, I was asking questions and asking for clarification as opposed to accusing, naming calling, etc.  I want to find out what their mentality was behind this method, when I can think of at least 4-5 other methods to combat piracy that are less invasive and what I view as more consumer friendly.  I’ll be sure to post here if I get a response.

  14. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I was looking forward to this game – actually it was going to be my number one priority game purchase this year – but not anymore.  I’m getting beyond tired of this DRM nonsense – I’m not a pirate – I’ve never pirated a game in my life, so I don’t see why I should be limited to three installs.  With a limited amount of room on my hard drive I often find myself uninstalling games when I tire of them and reinstalling them later when I want to play again.  With this latest form of DRM not only am I treated as a pirate by the game manufacturer, but even if I use the game legitimately I’m going to be stuck with an unusable game within a year or two.

    It’s about time we customers protested these DRM practices and made the game developers understand that we’re not going to take this BS anymore.  The way to do that is to refuse to buy these games.  I’m certainly going to do that with Spore.

  15. 0
    Papa Midnight says:

    You’re correct. Bioshock was 2K Games, not Electronic Arts. Yes, it also featured SecuROM "protection". Additionally, Mass Effect also included SecuROM "protection". I despise both. Both cause more problems than they are worth in addition to doing absolutely nothing to prevent cracking. Spore is a perfect example. It was available on "The Scene" and on BitTorrent trackers in less than 24 hours. Additionally, yes, the Steam version of BioShock does include SecuROM which makes absolutely no sense to me.

    Anyway, I don’t think companies get it. Nothing, and I mean Nothing, will protect them from being copied. As I say, the greater the protection, the greater the personal ashamedness a person will experience when their "uncrackable protection" is decimated.

    It also pisses off their customers. Look at Spore. Supposedly it’s a darn good game, but people are slaughtering the rating due to it because they refuse to curse their computers to the hell known as SecuROM. I personally agree. I’ll also tell you why this is bad for EA which already draws poor consumer response. As a consumer and a person who’s dealt with advertising agencies, I know that bad ratings do detract from sales. It also hurts review websites who state one thing when consumers say something else. A reviewer is seen as having been paid off or of writing an illegitimate review. I’m sure we all remember the GameSpot incident over Kane & Lynch which wasn’t quite the same but was a perfect example. I’m sure we also remember the questioning of GTA IV’s perfect ratings.

    The fact of that matter is that "Copy protection" is a farce and provides little more than a false sense of security. It’s about as effective as putting a sign on your lawn that say "Protected By Brinks Home Security". Another example is Assassin’s Creed, specifically the PC version. Ubisoft prided themselves in that they had made it so persons who got an illegitimate game could not get past a certain point but could play up to a point that it may entice them to purchase the game. Well, the retail version which some legitimately purchased had problems as well and thus Ubisoft needed to provide a patch. However, less than 24 hours after the discovery of this problem, it was cracked by the same persons who initally cracked it and out for all to download with no problem. Ubisoft ended up blaming a "lack of sales" on the cracking of it and blamed their distributor for a leaking of the game.

    Publishers and Developers are always looking for someone to blame but what they need to do is learn that the old models do not work. They need to move on with the times. The RIAA needs to do the same thing. All corporations need to learn that Consumers will no longer stand for this and will not only refuse to buy their product but refuse to allow others to do so as well for their own good. For the sake of their own livelihoods, business’ need to learn this fact or else they will not survive in this new era.

    Speaking of embarrasments, anyone remember the absolutely embarassing situation when Sony’s Audio CD copy protection was defeated by a Sharpie back in 2002? Now that was absolutely hilarious.

    —-
    Papa Midnight
    http://www.otakutimes.com
    http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

  16. 0
    Zaruka ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    sry for the double post did not finsh my thing

    then when that going to happion to consoles the  companys will start making outrages poliecys that will make us the customers not able to do anything since we are the one buying their console they can do any thing they mostly want to it but since  DRM puts a virus and it is a virus that can make some  computers crash should be against the law.

    Thanks again

    Zaruka

  17. 0
    Papa Midnight says:

    SecuROM exhibits the same patterns as a root-kit when it is installed, even going so far as to actively disable daemon-tools.

    I personally got tired of carrying around all my disc and ripped my copies of WarCraft II, StarCraft, GTA, etc. to my HDD. I use Daemon Tools to mount those ISOs because I get 4 Virtual drives. This makes my life much easier since I don’t have to carry around my case full of CD’s and DVD’s.

    Now when you have a program actively disrupting the actions of others, I believe we refer to that officially as a virus.

    —-
    Papa Midnight
    http://www.otakutimes.com
    http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

  18. 0
    Anonymous says:

    yea then when pc gaming dies from this it goes from no one making pc games to becoming consoles then what happions

    mods

    chips

    hack

    to console

    it dont matter in history there will be people able to get something free

    it never change pirates will be there always but making your paying customers suffer is what gonna end them eventualy

     

    Thanks

    Zaruka

  19. 0
    David D. ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    You are not notified during the installation that SecuROM is being installed on your computer. However, it’s easy to tell if it’s been installed–just do a file search on the word "secuROM" and you’ll find a file with some .dlls in it as well as a text file telling you not to remove the directory or its files or you’ll lose your digital rights to the program.

  20. 0
    hcf says:

    Every piece of DRM reinforces the console’s place in the gaming world.  I guess it’s a good deal; we’re paying console companies to keep their batshit crazy DRM on a piece of hardware we don’t otherwise need and can’t otherwise be harmful.

  21. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    lol people are just now noticing EA’s treatment of loyal customers as pirates?

    bah, i’m officialy not buying ANYTHING with the "EA" logo on it, and by anything i mean ANYTHING, even console titles. Not untill they drop this little charade.

    pirates are getting the upper hand with this bullox. and thus far i’ve already recruited several people to my cause in my area alone, and i’m seeing i’m not the only one pushing a boycott of EA products now :) kewl.

     

    why did i do this? before it gets asked, simply put, i was locked out of my Crysis install by this DRM, and they "had a problem on their end" that forced me to open a second EA.com account so they could credit me a new free copy of the game. as well as recently i’ve been locked out of my PC version of Mass Effect just because i installed it once on my comp, once on the family comp, and then tried to install the Bring down the Sky content package on my comp. apparently the DRM mistook that as a new install and locked me out of BOTH copies of my game, despite it claims i’m allowed THREE active copies.  so yeah, i’ve had my run ins with this bullox DRM and i’m sick of being treated as such.

    any EA game i get from now on is comming second hand from ebay or gamestops used shelves.

  22. 0
    Pinworm4545 says:

     I don’t see why EA takes so much flak for this. They didn’t create Securom, and they weren’t the first ones to use THIS version of it – that honor goes to Take Two putting it on Bioshock.

  23. 0
    gs2005 says:

    Amazon may have a nonchalance attitude about erasing the negative opinions, but the feedback system is a malediction in a way, so they will get to deal with this again and again…

  24. 0
    TJLK says:

    I do appreciate the negative effects of piracy but I don’t agree with this particular remedy.  It is a bad business decision and as much as I’d like to pretend it isn’t because it is a game released by a major publisher I know that I’d simply be lying to myself.  I think the consolidation of all these companies is going to negatively effect video games in similar manners so we need to be extremely vocal about such things.  Speak out by either opening your mouth, closing your wallet or lending your support to smaller independent developers.

  25. 0
    NovaBlack says:

    Ive got to say though, it isnt piracy harming these developers…

     

    its their publishers insistence on using draconian DRM that is hurting them.

     

    If a customer decides NOT to buy their game no matter what, out of principal, wether they then pirate it or not after that decision,  it doesnt matter, the developers arent having money taken out of their pockets as there was never a chance of a sale in the first place, the DRM saw to that,  so the pirated copy isnt a lost sale.

     

    I mean i completely agree, stealing isnt justified no matter what , and personally, pirating isnt for me. Never have done it, never will. BUT i wont sit here n pretend that somebody who ISNT going to buy the game due to the DRM , n then pirates it in protest is actually ‘lost sale because of piracy’. its not. its a lost sale because of DRM.  And they cant be losing money if there was no chance of them getting it in the first place.

  26. 0
    Zaruka ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    DRM dont work simple as that mostly causes problems for the customer while pirates just keep on playing.

     

    if i do buy spore im gonna have to crack it so i dont have the drm crap.

     

    ant that sad

    Thanks

    Zaruka

  27. 0
    chadachada(123) says:

    And those that want a flawless running game without headaches but found out about this crap EA is putting on, pirate. I still say pirate then mail money to Maxis, no joke.

  28. 0
    LujanD says:

    E. Zachary Knight said, "I am sorry. There is no game on the Earth that nobody can live without."

    *GASPS*

    *Grabs Infinity Engine Games and Fallout Series*

    Block your ears my loves; it’s crazy talk, it is!

  29. 0
    Hitodama says:

    This SecuROM thing is total crap. It doesn’t stop piracy in anyway, and only puts my privacy and livelyhood at risk for the sake of EA’s ego. Unfortunently I already purchased and installed that game… I suppose I should look into the SecuROMless version. I paid my money. I didn’t order some psuedo-virus. I ordered a game.

  30. 0
    chadachada(123) says:

    I actually planned on buying the game, or at least was very interested in it. I still want to play it, but there’s no way in hell I’m dealing with that crap. I’ve installed my Diablo II game at least 5 times over the past, what, 10 years? That alone is reason not to buy this crap. What if I don’t even have an internet connection? I’m still considering whether I want to pirate it or not, I don’t even think my pc can run it, it’d just be a waste of space. Point is, they don’t deserve any money, but if people want to play it, I say go ahead and play it!

  31. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    This makes me want to write a FireFox plugin that links to an amazon review section and keeps an constant count of the reviews.

    Today I have seen everything from 100 1 starr reviews to GP’s 640 1 star reviews.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  32. 0
    Austin_Lewis says:

    So, we’ve gotten to the age where companies are going to protect their mediocre games with viruses and malware, eh? 

    God I hate EA.  Everything they’ve done lately is shit anyway.

  33. 0
    Geoff ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Yes, SecurROM installs under the radar and yes, you can’t delete it from the Registry Keys. Tried it, didn’t work.

    Also uninstalling the game doesn’t get rid of it.  It came with Creature Creator as well.  After I uninstalled CC but before I installed the full version of the game (yeah, I took the risk with it, so sue me) I tried to get rid of the SecurROM folder.  Wouldn’t let me do it. 

    I have heard that there are third-party programs that will help get rid of it.  I’m all in favor of this.  Rather than pirating the game (which just encourages more DRM) or all-out boycott (which, honestly, I don’t think is possible since not enough people will get behind it) I’m all for programs being created to help get rid of these stupid DRMs.  It may be skirting the law in terms of modding the product, but it isn’t "theft".  BTW, does anyone know of any reputable products that get rid of SecurROM?  At the very least I’d like to get rid of the crap if I decide to uninstall Spore.

  34. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    Just a continuation of thought.

    It does annoy me when people *cough*zippy*cough* say that gaming is a right. It is a privalige that can be lived without.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  35. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    Absolutely. There is many ways that software can delete proof itself in a Windows environment. Viruses and spyware do it all the time. There is some software out there that will help you remove such folders and files, but I bet that if you did remove it, Spore would cease to function. It most likely checks for that folder and specific files within it at start up. IF they are not present, the game won’t run.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  36. 0
    Woundwalker says:

    True, but it’s such a shame and it does annoy me.

    I don’t know how Maxis/EA work, but I highly doubt that the people responsible for the creative spark behind the game are the same ones that shackled it with this awful DRM. It’s like they smudged a masterpiece.

    Anyway, I won’t be getting hold of the game legally or illegally. I was kinda sorta considering buying it, but the DRM thing has killed it for me. Fable 2/Football Manager 2009 here I come…

    Perfect example of the anti-piracy measures meant to protect sales damaging them. The measures were broken down within days, EA have angered loads of paying and potential customers and stopped zero pirates. That’s what makes me angry.

  37. 0
    NovaBlack says:

    well when i installed spore i didnt get ANY notification it was goig to be installed, or option to say no.

    So 99.9% certain it installs under the radar.

     

    In other rumours somebody told me that if you find the securom folder, you CANT delete it, and if you format your drive it can protect itself and remain there.  It aslo causes many hardware problems with CD/DVD writers.

  38. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    I agree that we shouldn’t pirate in protest. That said, the people who have made the game have already been compensated. The only one hurting for a return on their investment is the publisher who forced the DRM.

    Of course the dev team may be less likely to get a green light on any similar game in the future which could hurt them.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  39. 0
    DoggySpew says:

    Question:  Is Securerom installed noticably ? Can you see if Securerom is installed ?

    I’m asking this, because SecureRom I think is illegal in the Netherlands, because of some court order (It’s allowed to have 1 backup copy of the game, and programs are not allowed to alter the function of a PC without permission)

     

     

  40. 0
    JustChris says:

    I have a book that shows Electronic Art’s original marketing poster and mission statement. Reading it truly makes me amazed at how different they were. My guess is, no one expected their company to get so huge.

  41. 0
    Zerodash. ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Yes, the DRM sucks.  Blame EA. 

    HOWEVER. There were hard-working people who worked on this game.  Most of them had no say in the DRM methods.  Pirating hurts them too.

    If you don’t like the DRM, don’t buy it.  But don’t pretend you are justified in stealing it either. 

  42. 0
    JustChris says:

    I don’t think PC gaming in general sucks either, but unfortunately there are inevitable things that happen/are made because of the nature of PC gaming. PCs are a very hackable, moddable platform, moreso than any console so companies get all uppity with hack-proofing and copy-proofing their games. You don’t get this problem with consoles since every one is built exactly to spec, software and hardware wise, and it takes a bit more effort to modify them.

    The most moddable mainstream game platform out now is the Sony PSP and Sony’s reaction to keep their system pirate-proof was firmware upgrades. Many people mod their consoles to play pirated games, but others use them for homebrew stuff.

    I used to be in the PSP homebrew scene and think it would be great if Sony had some sort of kit like Microsoft’s XNA to encourage it. Instead, we have this funny cat-and-mouse game between Sony and the homebrew coders. Or rather, an arms race to create newer software that counter-attacks the other side.

  43. 0
    Freyar says:

    The problem really is that people want the experience. That’s what they are wanting more than just the game as is released.

    The argument to "Not buy the game" is a difficult one to focus on mainly because certain titles can be seen as a "I’ll never see this experience in the future."

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  44. 0
    Tolazytoapplyforalogon says:

    By not pirating the game and not buying the game, will accomplish the same thing.

    To lose ones morality for the sake of spite, who is the real loser?

  45. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    They don’t know why your pirating it, though. There isn’t an e-mail sent to EA everytime that somebody pirates it to protest the DRM. As far as they can tell, you had no intention of buying the product in the first place.

    Yes, EA did become theives by doing this. But, you, the consumer, paid, to have the theives steal from you.

  46. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    I agree. By Pirating the game, you are just telling EA and all the other game companies that use restrictive DRM, that they need to step up their efforts to fight piracy. They see that there was a legitimate desire among gamers to own the gme, but they would rather have it for free than pay for it.

    The best thing that you can do, is not buy the freaking game. Don’t download the freaking game. Let them know that you will not own any game with restrictive DRM at any price. If you do this, it will get the message accross. The Game companies will see that their audience would rather deal without than play DRM laiden games.

    Boycotts are the only way to get the message across. I mean a complete boycott.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  47. 0
    Tolazytoapplyforalogon says:

    It’s amazing that these companies think they are fighting piracy and all they are doing is pissing of legitemate customers.  Pirates know that patching around DRM stuff is a cake walk, I would have to believe companies like EA should know the same thing.

    Those that pirate are going to pirate and those that don’t want to expect a flawless running game without headaches.

  48. 0
    Zen says:

    I don’t hate PC gaming just becuase of this (sorry if I sounded that way, I’m just pissed since I dropped 80 bucks on all of this just to find I paid to pretty much install a virus in my opinion). I just never got into PC gaming because ir always required some kind of upgrade just to play every other game at the level they love to show them at which would cost me hundreds of dollars, just to have the next game less than 6 months later run slowly unless I drop everything again.  I just prefer to play a game, have it look it’s best no matter what, use a big screen TV, the comfort of my couch, and a good surround sound.  I really do want to enjoy it more, I just hate all of this hastle that keeps coming up.

  49. 0
    Pinworm4545 says:

     Sometimes breaking the law is the only way to prevent an injustice.

     

    Revolution, so to speak.

     

    They treat their customers like pirates, customers become pirates. Sure, that brings us to where we are now, but they are going to lose money. The only way to stop this is for them to lose money and see that their piracy protection doesn’t work. Step one complete.

     

    I implore everyone to pirate this game. Send a message. If you say "but it’s illegal!" Then start killing Americans or you’re a traitor.

  50. 0
    Freyar says:

    Considering that we see EA becoming the theives here, It’s sad that they think they can put such restrictions on there. Especially when they are charging full price for the title too.

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  51. 0
    Freyar says:

    "Electronic Arts" should only be used when describing the company in a positive light like back in the 90s. These days it’s just EA got it? [/stewie] (I’m kidding. I personally refuse to call them Electronic Arts. Tarnishes my memory of the good days.)

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  52. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    Guys, please, do not download Spore just to spite EA, please. Theft is theft, and it doesn’t really indicate that the consumers would have willingly bought the game anyways. There is a way to come to an agreement between consumers and publishers, but piracy is not it. Please, do not become theives out of anger.

  53. 0
    Freyar says:

    It’s a shame, I was geared up to pick up a copy of Spore on the 11th. But then again, hearing about mediocre gameplay doesn’t help either. (Boring tribal portion, boring space exploration, and evolution having nothing to do with the creature itself.)

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  54. 0
    Matriculated says:

    I have no (and never had any) intention of buying Spore but hearing about this makes tempted to download an illegal copy to spite EA. Or at least I would if my PC had the right specs.

  55. 0
    Zen says:

    Now I’m pissed.  I bought the game yesterday (DS and PC versions even), just to find out today that I may have been screwed for buying the damn thing to begin with!  This is why I don’t like PC gaming that much and prefer to play on a console.  So I only get three installs then I’m done and have to buy it again if I’m understanding this correctly?  I was planning on redoing my entire PC next month, I installed it yesterday, and I wanted to install it on my wife’s laptop so she can play it during down time at her job.  I paid full f-ing price for a game just to be that limited.  I just LOVE how I paid that much money to find that I am getting less than someone that just stole the game.  So I’ll have to steal it too just to get what I paid for. 

  56. 0
    BunchaKneejerks says:

    I agree with you 100% of the way on this one. As I see it, a boycot has more personal meaning if you 100% refrain from dealing with the problem product / company. Pirating the game even though you disagree with DRM just of selfishness.

  57. 0
    ankaranakliyat133 says:

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    very nice sites.good.very nice sites.good.

  58. 0
    Anonymous says:

    "And I’m fine with the policy itself what I am not fine about is NOT having an automated way to reclaim a previously used license. That is the only think that stinks about Spore in its current EULA."

    Wherein it says EA can do whatever they want with the information (whatever it is, they neglect to explain) that they collect from every user who activates their game.  No opting out.

  59. 0
    Anonymous says:

    The guy in that Amazon review who thinks Sony are collecting billions of terrabytes of information from everyone who has SecuROM installed (incidently most of you do already, it comes as standard DRM with most games released over the past 2 years) is insanely deluded.

    Besides the manpower drain it would take to even analyse this information, I am assuming he thinks they stick it all in a big spreadsheet FFS?

    And anyway why the hell does he think Sony would want an endless list of dat files listing all the pornsites gamers have visited since the last reformat of the drive coupled with a giant mass of registry entries from demo’s, software and other odds and ends of the endless camount of crap thats been installed on your PC since the last format?

    I’m no fan generally of DRM but the biggest issue here is the 3 authorization policy not SecuROM. This is EA’s policy and one THEY have decided, on not Sony SecuROM.

    And I’m fine with the policy itself what I am not fine about is NOT having an automated way to reclaim a previously used license. That is the only think that stinks about Spore in its current EULA.

  60. 0
    Keith says:

    Spore: Galactic Edition, you sit on my game shelf taunting me.  When someone, either EA or some guy in a basement, I don’t care who first, releases a SecuROM-free, multiplayer-enabled version, I will play you.  Oh EA.  I would love to play your game I have been worshipping for years but I want to control my own computer and principles more.  At least I can watch the National Geographic DVD without losing control of my computer; on second thought, I’d better only watch that on a standalone player, shouldn’t I?

  61. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    pssst borrowing software is considered piracy, similar to "borrowing" a music CD :p

    thats why they want to limit the installs, to PREVENT this exact form of piracy :p

  62. 0
    jParadox says:

    Instead of complaining about the DRM/SecuROM and how it’s messed up, and instead of saying "Oh I’m going to pirate all EA games!" how about filing a class-action lawsuit against EA? It could screw up EA, and you *might* benefit somewhere.  Then again, it may lead nowhere, but what’s life without taking a few risks?

    I say, do try a class-action lawsuit.  What could it hurt? It’s better than complaining and admitting to piracy, and you COULD benefit in the end and EA could end up removing the SecuROM because a judge MADE them.

    Seriously. Piracy won’t get you anywhere. (Except for in jail if you’re caught.) Complaining without taking action won’t get you anywhere. Take action.

    I just don’t buy EA games. I usually just borrow them off of friends.  (What can I say?  I prefer to borrow them from friends before I decide to buy.)

     

  63. 0
    Murry says:

    You want to stop EA from using this kinda DRM then there is only 2 ways to really accomplish it.

    1. Lawsuits over the damage the DRM causes and its virus like nature

    2. Get more reviewers to start taking DRM into account when they review a game and give it a score.

    You think if IGN, Gamespot, ect ect, started giving games abysmal scores to EA’s games because of the DRM that EA wouldnt respond by changing it? I feel its a fair tactic too because frankly youre reviewing a product, and if that product limits your ability to use it, damages your system, or refuses to work if other common applications are present… well thats someting the reader should know and its something that should be taken into account when the final review score comes. Because that score is basicaly the review in compact form and serves as a recommondation to get the game or to pass.

     

    Now is it likely that were going to see this happen? Sadly no. Sites like that trive off the money from advertisers and the pressure from up top to give better scores is going to be too great for many reviewers to get away with creating waves. The guys up top usualy wouldnt even care if the game formats your computer every 10 days, just so long as they get their green. Sad.

  64. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Your average shopper in a game store isn’t… All they get is reviews that say ‘Spore is cool’ and by the time they find out that securerom is definately *not* cool it’s too late.

    Remember GP readers tend to be more informed than the masses.

     

  65. 0
    Asatruer says:

    This leads us to the problems in the anti-consumer nature of the EULAs in the first place.  They pop up to read, then accept or reject, after you have already bought the game and if you do reject it you are 90% likely to be unable to get a full refund.

  66. 0
    Father Time says:

    Here’s an idea, read the EULA, read everything it says before you install it, if it doesn’t mention the harmful effects of Securom or DRM or whatever I think that may be good reason to start a class action lawsuit.

  67. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    Agreed. It is malicious enough that it should be a warning label on the box. So then the consumer can make the decision to willfully install the trash on his/her computer. Maybe, there should also be a large sign made, listing each of the standard DRMs out there, and the primary problems they cause/things they do, and have it up at every store, like what has been demanded for rating systems…

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  68. 0
    bpm195 says:

     Because the average person has no clue how they got google/yahoo toolbar installed on their computer, and doesn’t even know what a registry is, let alone when something has mucked with it.

  69. 0
    Freyar says:

    DRM schemes ought to be placed on the box of software being sold. I want to know what harmful ‘protections’ the publisher is forcing on my already screwed-over machine. (Damn SecuROM is actually running in the background right now.)

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  70. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    Didn”t mean to sound harsh. BUt as I said, the information is there for those who look. I agree that there are a lot of people that don’t follow the gaming news as much as others and wouldn’t have known. So it is a valid concern for those unfortunate people.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  71. 0
    Zevorick says:

    I never said it was "secret knowledge" now did I? All I’m saying is there are a large number of consumers who are not going to know about this type of thing until it’s too late since it is not listed on the box. Eh. This will be the last product I ever buy from them.

  72. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    I knew about back when Mass Effect was released for the PC. They said then that they would be using Securom. So it has hardly been secret knowledge.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  73. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Doesn’t change the fact that some DRM products cause damage to people’s computers or otherwise interfere with their use of them. I’d be happy if the makers of such software were sued into oblivion.

  74. 0
    HalfShadow says:

    Yeah, but who anywhere in any form of sanity whatsoever thought a DRM that fucks around with your registry was in any way even a moderately intelligent thing to do?

  75. 0
    thefremen says:

     If you play russian roulette with a gun that has 6 chambers and 1 bullet with 6 people, at least 5 of those people will walk away saying "I don’t see what the problem is, the gun didn’t kill me when I pulled the  trigger"

    There are no two PCs exactly the same after a few months of use, what might be completely compatible with your particular setup may bring someone else’s machine to their knees. In example, it might not stop Roxio from burning a CD on a Sony drive, but it might prevent Nero 8.0 (but not Nero 7.5 mind you) from burning a dvd on a lite-on drive.

    That’s why you want software which only does what it says on the side of the box.

     

     

  76. 0
    DoggySpew says:

    Yeah, but that’s my point: Securom, for all the crap it gets from other people, doesn’t apparently do the things to my computer.

    So, for as long as I have Securom on my computer (Pretty much with every game I play, including Steam) I do not have problems burning DVD’s/CD’s, I do not have problems with my Anti-virus, and I do not have firewall problems.

    Then why is it such a problem elsewhere ? Am I the exception, or is this issue just overblown ?

  77. 0
    Anonymous says:

    – We have the right to hold back release of any game planned for whatever reason we want to.

    – We have the right to force our developers to completely revamp their entire game based on what our retailers say the consumers are buying at the moment. We have the extended right to make these decisions at any point in game development, regardless of the amount of work already completed.

  78. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    oh i didn’t mean any complaint of CD Keys really, i actually kinda preferred that one despite its minor and only minor drawbacks. i was just using it as an example of how the copy protection is meant as a deterrant, not to "prevent"

    new DRM relying on online accounts, locked install numbers, and malware is just bad and i won’t support it. This is why people pirate, and what causes it (as seen by those here who admit to preferance to the hassle free, malware free installs of an illegal copy of EA products now)

    i LIKE steam, but i have the fear of what happens in 10 years? 15? when Steam dies what happens to my games?

    its convenient NOW, but what about later? Unlike the copy of Tie Fighter i reinstalled, or the number of other old games i currently have installed (Duke 3D), i won’t be able to just pop in a backup or original disc and go at it again.

    the digital distribution of games i do enjoy (no cd swapping! woot!) but the required online registration with servers that may not exist later scares me some here as i KNOW for a fact EA and Ubisoft aren’t the kind of companies that’ll release a patch before they die that’ll unlock their games.

    i’m not to worried about that atm though as much as the issue i upgrade/rebuild my system every so often and usually dual boot, so limited installs damages me, as i can’t just reinstall and go anymore. i lose everything, $50 or so bux down for a rental. a play once and trash it later game.

  79. 0
    Azhrarn says:

    Actually, in my opinion requiring a valid CD-key for online play is fine with me. I’ve been through the key-retrieval mill with the original half-life (had a pre-steam version, it did not play nice when my bro decided to reinstall it later, because it wanted steam after an update. Got rejected, then indeed had to send a scan of my disc, package (DVD-case, no box, this is the EU afteral) and receipt (which I always keep in the DVD-case))
    Received a new key a couple of days later, worked a treat.
    It’s a bit of a hassle, but less dramatic than something like this borderline malware stuff EA is pulling now.
    Infact, because of how agressive this thing is (installing unannounced, not removeable, doesn’t uninstall when you remove the game, etc), that may actually make it illegal in the Netherlands, providing enough attention is drawn to it.

    No software is allowed to install anything without your permission, and that tiny bit of hell in software form definately isn’t wanted.
     

  80. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    actually CD keys did limit/restrict online access to pirates by the "no valid cd key = no MP" but it also damaged legit players (fewer than if there hadn’t been any key) cause if a pirate generated the legit players key, it was hell to prove you owned the game and not the pirate, so you could get a new key (they wanted shit like a scan of the game disc, case, manual, and reciept… reciept?! that went into the trash right after i got home 2/3 of the time!)

    the DRM’s purpose supposedly is supposed to be to a deterrent to keep average joe from loaning the game to a friend and letting said friend "copy" it to his comp.

    this DRM does do that, but so did a simple CD-Key.

    the problem is now, its gotten carried away beyond belief, and restricts actual gamers from maintaining long term interest in their games.

    like others above i still play my old games (like recently i’ve taken back to playing Quest for Glory and Tie Fighter, games from the 1995 and prior era of gaming) but with this freaked out DRM, this wouldn’t be possible unless i had a pirated/illegal copy of my games. instead, a couple of years or so from now i’d be outta luck as support would be dead on the game, who knows if the activation servers would even be up anymore, let alone the download (for the DD versions. as apparently they even cut you off after 6 months if you didn’t back up the files yourself, or didn’t pay them for "insurance") whats a person to do when that happens? just shrug and consider it $50 bux or whatever was spent wasted on a rental service for a few months?

  81. 0
    SS says:

    Maybe if they didn’t count hardware changes as installations.  i’m gonna buy a new mobo soon and a new gfx card when i earn enough money.  So i have basically used my installations up.  I might have to upgrade to vista.  that’s another installation and I would have to go through their horrible customer service and spend a lot of time in it.

  82. 0
    Jeff says:

    3 installation limit on software already? News to me but then I don’t really use commercial software…

    I assume you’re the type of person who doesn’t like to go back and play a game from more than 1 or 2 years ago correct? If that’s the case then I would suppose the 3-installation limit would be no big deal to you because in a year or two the game would find its place in your trash heap. However you seem to assume that’s the way all gamers are… MOST gamers like to go back and play their old games. I’ve got games that date all the way back to the 80’s that I still go back and play. I don’t buy a game just to have it for a year or two. When I buy a game I’m investing in it for the LONGTERM. I anticipate playing it again at some point so installation limit is UNACCEPTABLE and I don’t always expect the game company to exist forever (so the phone home crap needs to go).

    But what do I know? I’m just an angry, overreacting nerd.

  83. 0
    Monte says:

    "These…. dare I say…… NERDS are just pissed because they can’t pirate."

    Considering how ANYONE CAN pirate spore at just about any torrent site or p2p hub, i don’t think the inability to pirate is an issue for anyone… If you haven’t heard the DRM has already failed in it’s purpose to stop pirating

    It’s an issue of being limited to 3 installs, needing to go through hoops and hurdles to get more installs if you need them, and vicious malware that can cause trouble from some people… overall, pirates remained unstopped, and the actual paying customers get treated like criminals

  84. 0
    Paulrus-Keaton? ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I don’t give two shits about the DRM thingy.

    So you have only 3 installations. BIG FUCKING WOOP. These fucks are just over-reacting. Last time I checked, don’t alot of non-game programs give you only 3 installations ANYWAY?

    These…. dare I say…… NERDS are just pissed because they can’t pirate and they just need to meet their "I HATE EA" quota for the week.

    That’s how I see it.

  85. 0
    thefremen says:

     It doesn’t affect your ability to copy games. It affects your ability to burn DVDs/CDs and plays havoc with antivirus. It is installed as part of the software but there is no notification whatsoever on the outer packaging other than mentioning that it doesn’t work with all drives (which is true, securom  isn’t compatible with all drives). If you do run into a problem (like firewall settings keep you from contacting the authentication servers) you’re up shit creek without a paddle.

  86. 0
    DoggySpew says:

    Personally, I don’t have any problems with Securom, because I don’t copy games. Sony’s DRM was much worse in that sense, and it took a lawsuit to stop using it. Why not use said lawsuit as a precedent against Securom if it really causes that much trouble ?

  87. 0
    William Hart ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Well Overreacting Nerd you forgot a couple of things. If you update your drivers, that uses up an install point. If you get a new graphics card, thats a new install point. Pretty much any time your computer auto updates a driver, your using up an install point, any questions?

  88. 0
    Azhrarn says:

    You know the answer to that as well as anyone here. No it has not. Even back in the days when bad floppy sectors or pop quizes were being used it only slowed it down for a few days/weeks and then it got pirated like everything else.
    DRM does not and never has worked.

  89. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    she got it easy then :p

    i had to argue back and forth with EA tech support for nearly 4 months to get them to admit there was a problem with my Crysis license.

    and rather than fix it even, they just had me create a SECOND account for EA Downloader, and credited me a free copy of the game to that account…

    so now i have TWO EA accounts, 1 with a few games in it and a broken copy of crysis, and the other with nothing BUT crysis on it.    and i have to swap back and forth to use the games set to each account…

  90. 0
    Chadius ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Moar horror stories:

     

    My upstairs roomate bought a Sims 2 Expansion pack 2 weeks ago. It SecuROM’d her computer and she had to uninstall the expansion. She’s gone through 2 weeks of EA Customer Service hell, including my favorite part: They offered a cracked EXE file but the link to the download is invalid. lol. Of course the usual sites had a cracked copy of said expansion pack within a day. But, ya know whatever.

     

    If/When I buy Spore, I’m not going to install it. Instead I will download a pirated copy. That way I’ll have a legal but useless copy and an illegal but functioning copy. GG EA!

  91. 0
    davc4 says:

    Quite frankly this is a complete disgrace,

    1.  SecurRom is basically a bit of software that writes itself to the core elements of your pc/mac,  it can shut down legitimate programs Such as roxio,  it sends packets of information accross the internet to it’s creaters etc etc etc.
    Quite frankly im sure this is a violation of my rights as a legitimate consumer (not that i buy PC Games anymore but was definetly considering this game as a possible purchase)

    2.  Limiting the number of activations is just totally anti-consumer.

    Simple soloution in my eyes is to have a CD Key attached to an activation account so unlimited installs should be allowed against this activation account but only 1-3 users are allowed to be assigned to this activation account.

    Allow some free content to be downloaded on these activation accounts to entice people to have legitimate copies.

    All in all this seems to be a money making exercise first and foremost and i believe is totally unjustified from EA.
    Could we have a comment from the ECA regarding this.

    This may be wrong but i believe in your ECA Adverts Will Wright is a member.  If i am right about this would seem like a conflict of interests as his company have basically green lighted draconian anti-consumer measures on   his creation.

  92. 0
    mogbert says:

    There is a lot of information and opinions here. What I feel has already been said.

    Right now DRM serves no purpose. If someone wants to download the game illegally, then the DRM does absolutely nothing to stop them. If someone wants to borrow the disc from a friend, it will take him about 15 seconds to find the crack to let him play it.

    If DRM doesn’t deter pirates, who does it deter? Legitimate customers only. The only people being hurt by DRM is those that buy the game. Is this the way it is supposed to be? Is this what they want? Are the masses looking at the pirates and saying, "It’s because of you that the game is like this?" No, they are looking at the pirates and saying "They don’t seem to be having this problem…"

    Personally, I’m not into Spore. I really couldn’t care less about it. But the problem of DRM has caused me to seek out cracks for games I’ve purchased. In the end, the solution with the best customer service wins. If the worst customer service coincides with the highest prices, then what chance do they have. What ever happened to pirated games being buggy, prone to crashing, and may contain malware? I’ve actually gotten cracks that improved stability, added support for higher resolutions, unlocked extra levels in the game, added options like invincability or unlimmited ammo. Now off the shelf games are buggy, prone to crashing and full of malware, and the pirates are releasing the better quality games.

    I’m not condoning anything, only observing and stating the obvious. For me, the best corse of action had been purchaing the game and cracking it.

  93. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Technially, no one "owns" the software they buy.  They own a license to use it.  Ever since the old days.  The only difference is that pre-SecureROM, you didn’t have someone looming over your shoulder, breathing down your neck when you used that license.

  94. 0
    Nekojin ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    ""prevents you from using certain programs, such as DVD and CD burners"

    I wonder about that one."

    I can confirm that one, actually. My girlfriend has a no-name CD-ROM drive in her system. When we bought the Nightlife expansion for The Sims 2, it absolutely refused to install for her. When she complained to EA about it, she got nowhere. When we complained about it on a Sims 2 fan site, we were told that it was SecuROM, and the way to get around it was to copy the entire CD to disk, and install from there. It installed just fine, then.

    We then had to go through the exact same thing when we purchased the Family Fun Stuff Pack. We haven’t bought any more Sims 2 expansions after that, despite the fact that we really do enjoy the game.

  95. 0
    Dan ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    The only reason they can use the DRM is because it because in the end user license agreement you agree to it, so how is it legal for them to keep files on your system that are unremovable such as this DRM once you terminate your agreement with EA (through the methods listed that terminate the license in the EULA) and thus no longer have any agreement with the company.  Also with the termination clause it says that one can terminate the agreement at any time by destroying the software, however if some software remains on your system, how do you fully do this?

  96. 0
    Anonymous says:

    For a moment, I was intending to get Spore myself. I was stopped by the Mac requirements: Leopard and up (I’m running Tiger). Now I’m not even going to. I’m not sure how this SecureROM crap affects the Mac OS, but I’m sure as hell not crazy about finding out. At around $2000, his thing ain’t cheap!

    Now I’m going to hold onto my money and pray 3D Realms quits screwing around and gets Duke Nukem Forever on the market by Christmas next year. Speaking of which, is there any word yet on how far along it is other than "when it’s done"? I haven’t heard anything about it since June (heard plenty about Duke Nukem 3D coming to XBLA, though), and I’m sure a lot of Nukem fans would like to know when they can get their hands on it after 12 years.

  97. 0
    Deep Thorn ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    A lot of you are pissed, as well as you should be.  This was known about for at least 6 months though… if not a year…

    This has highly encouraged pircy, and a site I know of that normally only gets 500 downloads of a game like sims 2 after 3 months.  Spore is at 1,500 today…  This shows that if anything, this encourages more people to pirate than the opposite.  People do not like their stuff being messed with, and I do not blame them one bit.

    I am not encouraging stealing the game, most of you that will already have, and most of you that have not already wont.  I just suggest buying this game used since it sounds like there are a lot of people that will be returning their game due to not liking the game as much as they hoped, and what is said above.  There are applications to remove SuckROM, and though it is against the user agreement, I don’t see a problem with it as a gamer, as a developer, or as a company owner.  It should have never been installed, and if anything, it has hurt them more.

    @Werrick – This was EA’s choice, not anyone on the developement team, I would go further into that story, but I don’t want to get anyone in trouble.

  98. 0
    Werrick says:

    I haven’t been this disappointed in a game developer since Jack Emmert.

    I always thought Wright was a good guy who was not only a gamer himself, but also acknowledged some of the more pressing issues that we faced. I resent the hell out of this DRM thing and while I’m sure EA is the big bad guy in this issue, Wright has more than enough pull to have fought this for his gamers.

    Goddammit, Will… you really let me down.

  99. 0
    Freyar says:

    I was lucky, my boss bought a copy (and was smart enough to not register it yet), an dlet me play it last night. I started at 4:30PM my local time.. and totally spaced out until about 6:00 AM. The game is very addictive, and while a majority of it is played at the space stage, nurturing your little creations from the single-cell level gives you a bigger feeling of responsibility, plus seeing it’s history is aweomse.

     

    I really wish EA didn’t screw this one over, innovation in SPORE is here as promised despite a few naysayers. It runs VERY well even on low-end machines for the complexity it has. Simply put: The DRM is the only reason it would fail.

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  100. 0
    Brendan says:

    I bought the game on day one and am loving it. I had no idea that it coudl potentially damage my system…

    That said, Daemon tools works fine, and I haven’t had any issues with secuROM itself, but 3 installs and then I have to fucking call up their stupid hotline?

    Im going to downloaded the game and seed it for everyone else. Like a virtual cockslap.

     

    Screw you EA.

  101. 0
    thefremen says:

     There are different versions of Securom and some are worse than others. On my machine, securom 6.0 games work fine but i believe version 7 don’t verify correctly.

  102. 0
    Othello says:

    I have always been "google"-ing for Spore stuff way back when it first came for review. Will this game be better than "Black & White"? As far as the reviews and previews are concerned, Spore is a great Me-as-God game. But then, the Amazon reviews came and the field is not anymore on how the game’s graphics, interactivity, explorability or playability is concerned. It is now, do I really own it? Paying $50 and not "really" owning it is pure crap. EA should know better. If you bought it you owned it. No further restrictions necessary.

  103. 0
    OdinM1 says:

    Spore was a must buy for me (along with the PC version of Mass Effect) until they added this totally insane install limit.  Words cannot begin to express the sheer amount of hate I have towards "Satanic Art’s" right now.

     

  104. 0
    Father Time says:

    Rollercoaster tycoon 3 has Securom? Didn’t notice. Although I have lost the CD for the game, but not the expansion packs so I can’t re-install it anyway.

  105. 0
    GRIZZAM PRIME says:

    Yeah, that was pretty juvenille, but this time around it’s very appropriate, as it really is a matter of product quality.

     

    -Remember kids, personal responsibility is for losers! For information on games and psychology, look up: Jonathan Freedman(2002)Block & Crain(2007) Just to name a few…

  106. 0
    Father Time says:

    Anyone else reminded of that author who trashed games on Fox news and people spammed her reviews on Amazon?

    Oh well it seems much more appropriate here then in that instance.

  107. 0
    Zaruka ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    well guess i wont get red alert 3 too bad i wanted to try that game out never played the games before guess i have to stick with companys who make great pc games. I guess i have to buy EA games on consoles.

  108. 0
    William Hart ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    DRM is not meant to prevent priacy because believe me anything they throughout there can be cracked and is cracked within a day of it being released at the most.

    The only way a game will not be pirated is if StarFORCE is installed which can ruin your computer and being that people refuse to buy it and pirate it.

    They are pretty much screwing you as a paying customer, you need to send a message to them and do not buy the product

  109. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    just read at kotaku EA has no plans to drop the securom BS, and its gonna be in Red Alert 3.

    but they are allowing (/sarcastic "WOO") FIVE installs!

    oh boy!, still while pirates get the free run, us legit customers get screwed but we’re allowed to take it 2 more times!

    oh boy!

    i’m still boycotting them till this limited installs is gone.

  110. 0
    Monte says:

    this rather sucks i was looking forward to Spore, had some fun with the creature creator; and i was using just the basic demo… my laptop and desktop would be two installs alone; wouldn’t be hard for me to see myself needed a 4th install if not more… i’ve got some games i’ve install on my own computers like half-a-dozen times

    Frankly, we can only hope that gamers keep piling on the negative reaction to the DRM… a big enough negative reaction a long with less-than-stellar sales could be enough to get EA to make a few changes. A big evil company like EA does have a certain weakness for massive negative reaction along with poor sales. If i recall, they dropped the "need to re-activate EVERY 10 days" or something like that plan due to negative reaction. 

    Granted, gotta hope that the mass pirating of the game from disgruntled gamers will not offset this and end up delivering the idea to EA "it’s too late to get back your sales so it’s pointless to do anything at this point"… There’s nothing telling EA that the thousands of gamers pirating the game because of the DRM will turn around and buy a legal copy once EA starts making changes. 

  111. 0
    cppcrusader says:

    This talk of pirating the game just because of this is idiotic.  If the DRM makes you not want to pay for the game or to install the game, then don’t buy it, don’t install it!

    You know, most developers, well aside from the suits that muck things up, get into this game for the same reasons.  They have stories they want to tell, they love games so much that they want to create their own, and they want to entertain you.  I’ll let you in a secret that cuts deeper than simply not buying the game and pirating it.  Not playing the game period.  That would hurt me far more than someone pirating my game.  I consider myself an entertainer, I do this to entertain people.  Even if people still pirated my game out of protest they’ll still be playing the game, they’ll still end up talking about the game, and somewhere along the line people that simply hear others talk about the game will buy it.

    You want to send a clear message to EA and Maxis over this DRM issue?  Let Spore go down in gaming history as the greatest game that no one played.  The only thing worse than no one remembering your game 10 years from now, is everyone remembering it because nobody played it.

  112. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    For those mentioning Bioshocks use of this DRM, also note 2K REMOVED the activation limit that is so bothersome.

    they never removed the activation (which is no big whoop IMHO) but the limit of installs permitted is gone.

    the EA games are the only ones who actively use the limit, and have recieved more and more flak each time they’ve employed this method of DRM, because no matter how they employ it (such as Crysis’s version should "reset" the activations after 10 days of inactivity, whereas Mass Effect requires you to contact support to get ONE more activation setup, or the game tells you to BUY a new license) is bugged, and IMHO mistreatment of customers.

     

  113. 0
    Mech says:

    Daemon tools and Alchohol 120%, anything that lets you mount virtual DVD/CD drives. Even if you uninstall those programs, it still won’t work. Trust me, I KNOW. >:|

  114. 0
    Kharne says:

    "prevents you from using certain programs, such as DVD and CD burners"

    I wonder about that one.

    the thing is. I have spore, it’s installed, and just now I backed up a couple downloaded programs to DVD and it worked.

    I mean, if I was honestly feeling the DRM butthurt, shouldn’t that not be possible?

    Oh, I’m sure DRM is bad an all that. But for all the demons and cthulhu-esq nightmares that are supposed to pour out of my system the moment the disc touches the drive? Not so much. I’ve yet to see so much as a deep one on my splash screen (*rimshot!*)

    Then again I’m so massively jaded over the whole thing that I’ve long since stopped giving a crap, so I guess it’s all the same to me.

  115. 0
    Flipfox22 says:

    I’m glad I didn’t go and buy Spore yet. I had completely forgotten about this whole thing. It’s the definition of nuisance. I wonder how many people pirated the game out of spite, besides the initial crack that is.

    -Flipfox

  116. 0
    Agorwal says:

    SecuROM is by far the worst DRM I have ever encountered. I bought Warhammer 40k: Dawn of War (think it was that game anyway) which also had SecuROM on it. After installing the game I braced myself for the space marine vs ork slugfest and hit play and guess what? SecuROM wouldn’t let me playing because it was saying I had a virtual drive. I have never pirated a game in my life, no emulators, etc etc, so I contact SecuROM who tell me to contact whoever the hell made that game (good game btw, just cant remember the name of the company), who tell me to contact SecuROM, who over the course of 2 freaking weeks, finally determine that it is in fact their fault, and fix my game. a couple months later, I felt the desire to cause mass destruction and mayhem so I bought Rollercoaster Tycoon 3 (little did I know the human race had learned the gift of immortality in between games 1 and 3, invincible bastards), and what do i get? the same shiny message telling me I can’t play my game cause SecuROM can’t get it’s act together, and what does SecUROM tell me? the same thing they told me last time, it couldn’t possibly me their fault, contact the company, and the back-and-forth ensued with the same result as the last time, with SecuROM patching my game and letting me play. Spore (yes I did buy it, but apparently SecuROM has had my soul for some time now) luckily didn’t pull the same shenanigans (awesome word, never get to use it), but at the same time the 3 install thing is what i am most angry about, I mean I still have the original Warcraft, and I still install it every once and awhile when I feel like it, i’ve probably installed that game about 50 times in the time i’ve had it, and now EA has the nerve to treat me like a pirate.

     

    Since nobody will feel like shifting through that mess, basically what im saying is people should take Stardock’s example, Sins of a Solar Empire sold well, played great, and didn’t have any of this pirate protection garbage.

  117. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Yes it does.  Transgaming ported SecureROM to OSX.

    I’d avoid anything by ported in this manner (anything using Cider) until the effects of the OSX version are known.  It’s already claimed that it modifies system files.. and that can’t be healthy.

     

  118. 0
    It Came From Monday ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Oh joy: Another game I was looking forward to, with evil, computer-damaging DRM. Yes, I’m glad I chose to do the moral thing and wait for the actual product instead of downloading it on Bittorrent last week.

    The funny thing is that the lack of DRM on a lot of older titles is the only thing that keeps them alive. I can, to this day, boot up my copy of Crusader: No Remorse without having to worry if the DRM can connect to the company’s servers to verify that the copy is genuine. Stuff like SecuROM means that I won’t have the same luxury in another twelve years with a copy of Bioshock or Spore.

    What am I supposed to do? Buy a copy of the game and then leave it in the wrapper so I can download the pirated version? Put shortly… Why? Why should I support a company that has no means in place for me to play the game I want to pay money for without harming my computer? It’s frustrating as hell to know that the only way for me to support their release is to pay them for a copy of their game, and then go give tacit approval to piracy if I don’t want to infect my computer with an irremovable virus.

    I’ll pass on paying $70 for the priveledge of hunting down a malware-free copy of the game I just bought online. But screw it: I’ll happily do it when the game’s in the $5 bargain bin in six weeks. EA, you need to understand something here: You lost yourself a new sale in me, and every

    Software companies, wanna know why your sales suck? It’s THIS. Not pirates. Piracy always has been and always will be there. Pirates, however, don’t spam Amazon with terrible reviews of your product based on hidden malware you secretly installed on their systems. Customers do. And other, potential customers, take a look at that and avoid it just like they avoid tazering a monkey in a flash ad.

  119. 0
    Kangaroo Jockey says:

    Whilst I realise that this may be an unpopular suggestion, when I read the about the ‘activation limit’ (btw, does anyone actually /know/ what counts as an ‘activation’ anecdotal suggests driver updates can trigger one, as well as hardware upgrades)  why not adopt a model simmilar to MMO’s, each CD key being able to be linked to three EA accounts, no account, no DL content.  MMO’s as a rule have minimal problems with piracy.

     

    Anyway, just a thought. 

  120. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Anyone who won’t buy Spore for something like this deserves to die.  I would buy Spore if every copy came with a dead puppy and a robot that smacks you in the face every three minutes.

  121. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Hell, each CD linked to one account is fair enough.

    EA don’t want that.  They want you you to keep buying their latest crap – that means games that time out, and cost money to keep going (there’s a reason reactivation uses premium rate phone numbers).

    You can bet the game that Will Wright wrote is far more complete than the one released too – EA are kings of the expansion pack, and they’ll have kept loads of stuff back to sell at full price.. they learned well from the sims model.

    The problem is, people are stupid.  They’ll keep buying the crap, blame the hardware manfufacturers (or ‘viruses’) when their machines screw up due to securerom, and like sheep continue to give EA more money for years.  They can’t lose, especially when reviewers (who are under the pay of EA via advertising anyway) collude to not mention the issues.

     

     

  122. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Ah, so because I won’t willfully infect my computer with an IRREMOVABLE virus, I deserve to die?

    Y’know, evolution usually removes people as willful to inflict self-harm as you.

  123. 0
    Tem Weathers says:

    Maybe you’re the one that deserves to die for supporting crap like this?

    I refuse to buy Spore because of the SecuROM protection. The DVD drive on my computer is currently DEAD because of SecuROM messing with it. The problem started with not being able to burn disks, even with the Windows XP tool, and finally got to the point where my computer will no longer recognize disk drives, and the problem started last year, right after I installed FEAR, which also uses SecuROM.

    What pisses me off as well is that EA never mentioned anything about the protection, because they knew there would have been an outcry, just like with Bioshock.

  124. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I’ve spent hundreds of dollars on games over the last few months, and typically will only pirate a game if I have no other way of getting it legitimately (not on shelves/online purchase, refused classification and cant import etc). It is only right to support those who make the games we like, but when they insist on crippling my PC to play a game there is no way im going to support them.

    Spore wasn’t on my top few games list, looks a bit cartoony for my tastes, I doubt i’d buy or even bother taking the time to pirate it, but it’s pretty clear to me that DRM pushes otherwise paying customers to piracy to get the version of the software they should have received in the first place. Now if only these publishers would remove their heads from their posteriors and see the same thing.

  125. 0
    Kris O. says:

    When I installed the BioShock demo, it made no mention of any DRM being installed. However, SecuRom was included with the demo.

    "You give us the right to do whatever we want" probably won’t fly in the EULA. A class-action lawsuit might be possible.

  126. 0
    Kris O. says:

    The BioShock demo did this. It was a free-to-download demo, available from multiple sites, and it had freaking SecuRom included with it. How stupid is this?

  127. 0
    ZippyDSMlee says:

    FYI they removed the install tokens on Bioshock

    http://forums.2kgames.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18452

     

    The sad thing is the game was fully cracked few months before the change.

    DRM in a "only" fashion is not the answer, you want people to come online so you can weed out the bad copies then create a online account give out points to spend for game related crap have publishers joint together and let people buy music,posters,pictures and stuff from the store expand it to micro transactions for stuff int eh game, of coarse leave patches alone but put the effort into brining people online and having a non evasive key check system weed out the bad games, hell offer keys for half the price of the game do everything you can to bring in people and profit.

    Online only to get a game running is a no no in my book.

    I is fuzzy brained mew =^^=
    http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/
    (in need of a bad overhaul)

  128. 0
    Afirejar says:

    As far as I know, companies are reluctant to give out executables without their usual protection because they don’t want to provide an angle to remove it. I’ve seen demo versions with the copy protection intact.

  129. 0
    Papa Midnight says:

    You’re correct. Bioshock was 2K Games, not Electronic Arts. Yes, it also featured SecuROM "protection". Additionally, Mass Effect also included SecuROM "protection". I despise both. Both cause more problems than they are worth in addition to doing absolutely nothing to prevent cracking. Spore is a perfect example. It was available on "The Scene" and on BitTorrent trackers in less than 24 hours. Additionally, yes, the Steam version of BioShock does include SecuROM which makes absolutely no sense to me.

    Anyway, I don’t think companies get it. Nothing, and I mean Nothing, will protect them from being copied. As I say, the greater the protection, the greater the personal ashamedness a person will experience when their "uncrackable protection" is decimated.

    It also pisses off their customers. Look at Spore. Supposedly it’s a darn good game, but people are slaughtering the rating due to it because they refuse to curse their computers to the hell known as SecuROM. I personally agree. I’ll also tell you why this is bad for EA which already draws poor consumer response. As a consumer and a person who’s dealt with advertising agencies, I know that bad ratings do detract from sales. It also hurts review websites who state one thing when consumers say something else. A reviewer is seen as having been paid off or of writing an illegitimate review. I’m sure we all remember the GameSpot incident over Kane & Lynch which wasn’t quite the same but was a perfect example. I’m sure we also remember the questioning of GTA IV’s perfect ratings.

    The fact of that matter is that "Copy protection" is a farce and provides little more than a false sense of security. It’s about as effective as putting a sign on your lawn that say "Protected By Brinks Home Security". Another example is Assassin’s Creed, specifically the PC version. Ubisoft prided themselves in that they had made it so persons who got an illegitimate game could not get past a certain point but could play up to a point that it may entice them to purchase the game. Well, the retail version which some legitimately purchased had problems as well and thus Ubisoft needed to provide a patch. However, less than 24 hours after the discovery of this problem, it was cracked by the same persons who initally cracked it and out for all to download with no problem. Ubisoft ended up blaming a "lack of sales" on the cracking of it and blamed their distributor for a leaking of the game.

    Publishers and Developers are always looking for someone to blame but what they need to do is learn that the old models do not work. They need to move on with the times. The RIAA needs to do the same thing. All corporations need to learn that Consumers will no longer stand for this and will not only refuse to buy their product but refuse to allow others to do so as well for their own good. For the sake of their own livelihoods, business’ need to learn this fact or else they will not survive in this new era.

    Speaking of embarrasments, anyone remember the absolutely embarassing situation when Sony’s Audio CD copy protection was defeated by a Sharpie back in 2002? Now that was absolutely hilarious.

    —-
    Papa Midnight
    http://www.otakutimes.com
    http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

  130. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    Um…Bioshock was 2K not EA, although it did have securom.. You may be thinking Mass Effect, but  I was unaware of a Steam version of that.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  131. 0
    Nekojin ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    "It is beyond ridiculous to think that this will help combat piracy as usually the pirated version is available DRM free at most a week after release. (Mass Effect took about a week, mainly because there were quite a few security checks later in the game that the original crack missed)"

    I can say with certainty that Spore was available on the usual sites a week before the official release date. How’s that DRM working for you, EA? 

  132. 0
    Azhrarn says:

    Well, all EA releases since Mass Effect for PC have this Malware type of DRM.
    Before that they used the less agressive version of SecuROM that only demands that the CD/DVD is in the drive.
    These games no longer require the DVD to be present, but instead forces online activation, calls home at regular intervals (this was removed from Mass Effect after a lot of protest) and prevents you from installing it on more than 3 different hardware configurations. (A bit like the windows install, it ties itself to the hardware of the PC, reinstalls on the same computer don’t cost any tokens, but change to much hardware and it will reactivate and deduct one)

    It is beyond ridiculous to think that this will help combat piracy as usually the pirated version is available DRM free at most a week after release. (Mass Effect took about a week, mainly because there were quite a few security checks later in the game that the original crack missed)
    EA is only screwing with their consumers like this while the pirates are getting away without any of this stuff.
    Also, the online activation isn’t exactly reliable, in Mass Effect it failed quite often leaving the honest consumer with a very expensive beer coaster rather than a playable game since it WILL NOT run if it can not activate online. (and this is a fairly common problem with ME, just check their tech forums)

     

  133. 0
    Anonymous says:

    My wife just told me not to order sims 3 because EA have said all future products will have this malware.  She’s a *huge* sims fan too, but this just killed it for her.  In fact there was a panicked moment when I thought her machine might already be infected as someone said Sims 2 had it, but luckily it wasn’t (we won’t be buying any more expansions for it though).

    Spore, I was kinda interested in but won’t be buying or downloading – it’s just not worth the risk.

     

  134. 0
    Anonymous says:

    The Sims2 products released since April 2007 have Securom ‘protection’ (and all the tech problems that accompany it like error messages preventing startup, disk read errors, disabled drives and programs).  But not the activation stuff.

  135. 0
    Azhrarn says:

    That was mainly because it was out in Australia a full week before it was released in the US, so the hackers had plenty of time to crack the security.
    I know most games get released in the US first, but Spore was an exception.

     

  136. 0
    bpm195 says:

    That’s actually a good idea and we need the ECA to get behind it.

    I don’t mind product keys, and I don’t mind having to authenticate online. I refuse to buy a game that will limit the amount of computers I can play it on non concurrently.

  137. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    I believe dropping the whole idea, and just accepting that some people will pirate the software, while most people will go out and buy the game if they like it works. My point of comparison would be with what the RIAA is doing, and what artists like Trent Reznor have proven about it all. If you treat your customers like criminals, then they will tend to become criminals. If you treat your customers fairly and respectfully, they will reciprocate the gesture.

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  138. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    If we’re serious about finding a solution to this, we need a list of protections we find acceptable.

    Ideas?

    I believe that individualized product keys and requiring a disc for use are acceptable.

  139. 0
    Anonymous says:

    They even ported securerom to OSX, so that route’s out as well.

    Unfortunately nobody yet knows what horrors it inflicts on your machine.  Rumour has it is fucks around with system files and prevents system updates, and at least one person claims to have had to return his machine for repair after using it, but that could be a mixture of rumour and coincidence for all I know…

  140. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    I believe you are confused. It is commonplace. The ECA is tne Entertainment Consumers Association, defending gamers, and parent to GamePolitics. You probably got that confused with the ESA, which is the Entertainment Software Association, that represents the software companies, killed E3, and generally been heading down the path of the RIAA with a lot of things.

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  141. 0
    Anonymous says:

    "Civil disobedience only works when a civil right is threatened. Having a game without DRM is not a civil right.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091"

     

    This guy is preaching from a company everyone lost faith in and not just that but wants to put every gamer in jail they just hired people to sue you as a gamer regardless if they have proof you pirated something or not. This guy is apart of a company that now is hiring people who believe they shouldn’t have proof to sue you whether or not you stole something or not. ECA, you suck!

  142. 0
    DraginHikari says:

    Because the development of computer virus is pretty much already illegal, and by agreeing to those TOS agreements when you install the program you give them permission to do what is stated including using those type of pacakges.

  143. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    You don’t have an economic recourse against virus creators. You can’t really choose to download a virus creator’s product. Here, you can choose not to buy Spore. That is what I encourage gamers to do: institute a boycott.

  144. 0
    HalfShadow says:

    This isn’t the way to do things. The DRM software they have now is practically a malicious virus. We sue virus creators; why is it okay if it’s ‘to prevent piracy’?

  145. 0
    Anonymous says:

    — We have the right to publish the same game year after year with 1 or 2 changes, and charge another 60 dollars for it, instead of fixing the games we already have.

  146. 0
    SS says:

    Publisher Bill of Rights- by EA

    -We have the right to install instrusive software on your system without informing you(except in paragraph 657 in the EULA).

    -We have the right to allow you only as many installs as we want.

    -We have the right to provide bad customer support and make you waste money by calling us for more install limits. 

    -We have the right to presume you are guilty of being a pirate.

    -We have the right to f**k you as hard as we want for our own gains.

    -We have the right to provide help pirates with our DRM.

     -We have the right to treat you in disdain.

     

    Any I miss?

  147. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Normally, I think gamers over-react to such things as DRM, etc.

    Not this time however. The DRM on Spore is beyond ridiculous. EA needs to be pressured on this big-time. I know I will not buy the game until the DRM is changed.

  148. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    Your thinking the Etertainment SOFTWARE Association. I belong to the Entertainment CONSUMER Association. There is a difference.

    Also, all your comments have been cleared although they are inaccurate.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  149. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    You’re kidding, right? That was like 3rd or 4th generation DRMs. I also always disabled it in my copies of games. My first attemt resuted in me changing every single question in the pop quiz to be "Press a 1 and then Enter to continue.", and I made every answer be the number 1. If you didn’t follow the directions, I had a follow-up question which was "That was not a 1, please try again. Press a 1 and then Enter to continue." I did that for the old game "The Legend of Kyrandia". Of course, I also did silly things like rewriting all of the text dialog in the game, and changed the credits to be more like the MST3K guys mocking the entire game. But I was in High School at the time, had a lot of free time, and was easily amused.

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  150. 0
    William Hart ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    You yougins, in the days of yore DRM used to be you had to literally read the entire instruction book and take a pop quiz and figure out complex questions EVERY play. Even Street Fighter wa setup that way

  151. 0
    GRIZZAM PRIME says:

    Yep, EA still sucks ass. Nothing new.

     

    -Remember kids, personal responsibility is for losers! For information on games and psychology, look up: Jonathan Freedman(2002)Block & Crain(2007) Just to name a few…

  152. 0
    Anonymous says:

    "

    Civil disobedience only works when a civil right is threatened. Having a game without DRM is not a civil right.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091"

    Hey guys, how bad as the ECA been hit, everyone leaving, no one supports the ECA, wonder why

  153. 0
    kurisu7885 (can't log in) says:

    Makes me tempted to just pirate it and send some money directly to Maxis, makign sure EA doesn’t get a single stinking cent as I am sure that if Maxis had their way any form of DRM would never have been considered

  154. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    When my father was still alive, one of his favorite sayings was "every lock has a key, and all a lock does is keep the honest person out." DRMs are even more to the point — every DRM can be cracked, for the software companies to think otherwise is foolishness. Further, all the DRMs do is keep the honest customers from playing the game, eventually eaving only the dishonest, and the pirate to contend with. Yes, some security is implemented well, but it is just a matter of time for someone to figure out how to get around it. All the companies pushing DRM are doing is alienating their customers, and attracting the people who enjoy the challenge of cracking the DRMs. Historically, up to now, and most likely on into the future, DRMs have exactly the opposite desired effect intended.

    I can remember back in the day, when the DRM was a badly-formatted sector on a floppy disk, which was done by making the sector be written at a slower speed than the drive normally ran at, and the software would check/validate by reading that sector at the correct speed, in order to play the game. That was the trick used in the late 70’s & 80’s, which was easily overcome through people modifying their floppy drives to be able to correctly identify & write the bad sectors, eventually software developers dropped the concept entirely… for about 3 years, and then they started over again. Now, we’re in a perpetual arms race, between software developer/DRM maker, and pirate/cracker. And the people who end up getting hurt in this process is the average, honest customer.

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  155. 0
    Zaruka ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    no but  you do have to call them up on a phone which is not free phone call then yell at them for a hour or two maybe even a day or 3 then when you yell enough they give you one unlock install but guess what when there severs go down guess what the game cant play at all becuse it needs to connect to that shut down sever to install.

    Thanks

    Zaruka

  156. 0
    Beery says:

    This DRM nonsense actually ENCOURAGES pirates and tempts legitimate gamers to turn to piracy in order to simply play the games they buy.  After all, when a player tries to load Spore too many times, the only people who are going to help are the pirates.  This DRM nonsense is making pirates look like Robin Hood, and it makes developers and publishers look like the Sherrif of Nottingham.

  157. 0
    David D. ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I was particularly puzzled to find that Spore installed SecuROM on my computer even though I had purchased the game as a download directly from EA rather than as a disc in a box.

    I would think that it was impossible to copy the game to disc at any stage of the download and installation, considering that it’s all done through the EA download manager–so why is it on my machine? What is it doing while it sits there? And what of my data is it communicating back to its home planet?

  158. 0
    Anonymous says:

    EA went through this with Bioshock.  Personally, they lost a sale from me – I went from buying the PC version to renting the Xbox360 version.  What -really- killed it for me was that for all I could tell, the Steam version of Bioshock still installed Securom.. WTF??

     

    But, rather than learn, they apparently made it WORSE for Spore.  EA puts the RIAA to shame.. RIAA randomly prosecutes people, EA actively punishes paying customers.

  159. 0
    JustChris says:

    Seeing that the game was already cracked before it was sold, the DRM already failed its intended goal and is therefore unnecessary for the game. Too bad the game cannot be recalled. Even if EA was nice enough to do this, once the game goes gold it takes a while for developers to go back to revise the product and ship it out.

    But pirates already have the "superior" DRM-free version of Spore, anyways.

  160. 0
    Rathum says:

    This is so true. I actually pirated the game just because of DRM. I was planning on getting the game legally, but the 3 install limit absolutely killed it for me. SecuROM was literally the only reason I pirated a game.

    I do find it hilarious that the cracked version was online before the official release date because some copies were released early.

  161. 0
    Cattleprod says:

    The biggest insult is that it flat out does NOTHING to stop piracy, so they’re abusing their customers pretty much for the sake of abusing their customers.

  162. 0
    Rathum says:

    It was actually cracked a day before its release date. Oddly enough the Australian version was released on September 1 and the American version was released on September 7. A few stores in Australia released it on August 30 and the cracked version was uploaded on August 31, but a crackfix was released on September 1 becuase the game of an error with the crack (the group claimed it was minor, but people couldn’t even get it to work without the fix). So it was cracked a week before the American release, but really it was a day early due to early sales.

    This is what I’ve seen, so it might be a day off either way, but it’s about right.

  163. 0
    Freyar says:

    It’s annoying really. I was looking forward to playing SPORE, but as I’ve always maintained: Activation Limits = No Purchase.

    Even worse is that the game was cracked one-to-two weeks earlier than it’s release, so what’s the point of annoying a guy who wants to pay for it? A lot of people are pirating it (3000+ seeders) just to spite EA. I keep tellin’ yeh.. where’d the good old days of 1993 and 1999 go? EA’s been on the drugs too long, it’s starting to **** up it’s judgement.

    —- There is a limit for both politicians against video games, and video games against politicians. http://www.goteamretard.com

  164. 0
    Christian Astrup ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Yeah, I was really looking forward to this but i aint touching it with a teen foot pole until that stuff is changed. EA needs to learn that their costumers do not appreciate being treated like criminals and mistreated without proper reason.

  165. 0
    Dark Sovereign says:

    Woah, I didn’t know SecuROM was that bad…

    At least people are speaking up about it. Now that the consumer is having their say, we’ll probably see a reduction in this kind of software.

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