Edge Online Editor: Spore DRM Does Not Encourage Piracy

With the controversy surrounding Spore’s DRM reaching a fever pitch, Edge Online Editor Colin Campbell argues for calm and disputes some of the current theories about the relationship between DRM and piracy:

The anti-DRM crowd. They have a point, but then it gets lost by mob-insanity… They get mad about EA only offering three installs for Spore. I don’t know many people who install games on three computers, but I dare say it’s a few. EA says 1%. OK. That’s a significant number of people, all in all. They ought to be offered some more options…

 

I agree that the DRM solutions currently in use are often frustrating and damage publishers. They need to be improved. Customers need to be heard. Action needs to be taken. EA needs to address these issues one by one.

But there’s also a nasty sort of relativism going on here, that is weakening the position of those protestors who have a genuine grievance… And this mob-pandering argument that DRM encourages piracy? Please. What encourages piracy is dishonesty. Either you’re the sort of cheap f**k who wants something for nothing, or you’re not.
 

GP: For my money, Edge Online is among the top tier of video game news sites, but I can’t get behind Colin on this one. In regard to the issue regarding the number of installs, here’s a snippet of something I wrote this week for the Philadelphia Inquirer about my own gaming experience:

If you change PC’s or you are the type who keeps games for a long time and re-installs them periodically, you could be in for trouble. For example, I’m still playing EA’s Battlefield 1942 five years after release. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve deleted and reinstalled the game.

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109 comments

  1. 0
    Anonymous says:

    EA has consistently (and to this DAY) held Securom and all it’s problems/limitations to be there to fight piracy.  The mass download of this game from torrent sites is happening to punch a giant hole for all to see that Securom is a failure in that regard and that Securom is being used solely to impost limits on paying customers and is only marginally about preventing, or making weak stabs at preventing piracy.

    EA and other publishers imposing these limitations are being deceitful where Securom’s true purpose is concerned – hobbling legitimate purchasers.  Paying customers are the only ones playing by the rules and therefore the only ones who can be controlled.  Until they get wise anyway.

  2. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    i knew i was going somewhere with that :p you hit the nail dead on with that…

    my minds been shot lately, to much overtime at work is killing me (but it pays the bills)

  3. 0
    Solipsis says:

    For a boycott to be effective you’d have to have a large group of people who are willing to participate in it.

    That won’t happen with something like Spore because piracy is too entrenched. Most people (and I don’t say all people) who want to play the game will either cave and buy it, or cave and pirate it. The boycott sector will just wind up being too small to make a functional change.

    Also, someone mentioned previously, that protest of DRM seems like it will be a lose-lose situation. Piracy leads to increased DRM, decreased piracy leads to increased DRM. Lack of sales leads to no more similar titles being produced (the Clover Effect ) which really isn’t what we’re going for. Somehow, anything you do as an organized protest seems so fruitless that it increases the appeal of just working around the system.

  4. 0
    Solipsis says:

    Exactly… who’s going to pay for something that may or may not run and that can’t be returned once you’ve actually tried it out?

    Crytek’s problem isn’t just piracy, it’s the fact that they made Crysis, the game that after a year still defines the standard of a "hardcore" gaming pc. Making a product that average joe doesn’t even dream about trying to run isn’t exactly a mass market strategy.

  5. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Better still, they are saying that once you park the car in more than 3 garages, you have to ask permission to park it in a fourth… This isn’t even about copying, I’m not saying people should duplicate their cars, but they should be able to park it in any garage they so choose.

  6. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    If you treat all your customers like criminals, you will make it so your only customers are criminals.

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  7. 0
    Unruly says:

    Pulling this out of the extremes here, but it still fits.

    So back in the 60’s in the US, being in a sit in, which was just as illegal as piracy, in order to induce change and bring about equal rights wasn’t justified? Gandhi and his followers, who practiced various forms of civil disobediance from boycotts all the way to marches and fasts in order to bring about independance and equal rights, weren’t justified? Or have I just fooled myself into thinking that taking a stand through non-violent civil disobediance in order to cause change in a flawed or broken system is legitimized?

    Yes, there are people who will pirate no matter what, and they are the mentioned "cheap f**ks who want something for nothing," but in the case of Spore the levels of piracy for this ONE title have skyrocketed past anything seen before. Combine that with what’s happening on sites like Amazon and you can see that the consumer backlash against Spore is an obvious example of widescale unrest at how things are currently being done.

  8. 0
    CK20XX says:

    That said, I’m not sure a boycott would ever work, as there always seem to be plenty of people who are either uninformed, don’t care about the DRM, or aren’t willing to go without the game – and purchase it anyway.

    Hmmm… you may be on to something there.  Boycotting can be difficult to organize, yeah, and if it doesn’t work, piracy can be like a reinforced boycott.  If boycotting is a punch, piracy is a one-two punch.

    …wait, that’s not what you’re trying to say at all.  Sorry.

    But why wouldn’t an ordinary boycott work in this case?  If everyone who was pirating just didn’t buy the game instead, EA would get a firm message and then… well, I know there’s precious little chance of getting caught anyway, but then you’d be in the absolute clear…

    …bah, this is funny.  It’s tough to argue for what’s right or moral when piracy just seems so easy and practical.  Perhaps that’s where the root lies.  And with the pirates focused on EA, a company that has quite a dubious reputation, it’s like how Annonymous is heroic as long as they keep focusing their power against scientology.  The enemy of my enemy is my friend, as the saying goes.  The morality seems gray all around here.

    BUT… it’s true that piracy leads to companies wanting to make DRM in the first place.  Then the piracy gets worse, then the DRM gets worse, and thus the result is a viscious circle.  When will it stop spinning?

  9. 0
    GrimCW ( User Karma: -3 ) says:

    i disagree with that guy on a simple grounds.

    how many people here or elsewhere ADMITTED they BOUGHT the game but DID NOT open it and then downloaded the pirate version so they could play with unlimited installs?

    his point is moot right there, we are willing to pay for things we can USE, but EA selling this game like this is like a car dealer selling you a car with the terms that "once its out of gas you can’t refill it"

  10. 0
    Thad says:

    Neither does he back his claim that DRM is not encouraging piracy with any numbes.  The fact is, a hell of a lot of people are pirating Spore, a lot more than pirate most games.  Forbes ( http://www.forbes.com/technology/2008/09/12/spore-drm-piracy-tech-security-cx_ag_mji_0912spore.html ):

     

    (Begin quote)

    As of Thursday afternoon, "Spore" had been illegally downloaded on file-sharing networks using BitTorrent peer-to-peer transfer 171,402 times since Sept. 1, according to Big Champagne, a peer-to-peer research firm. That’s hardly a record: a popular game often hits those kinds of six-figure piracy numbers, says Big Champagne Chief Executive Eric Garland.

    But not usually so quickly. In just the 24-hour period between Wednesday and Thursday, illegal downloaders snagged more than 35,000 copies, and, as of Thursday evening, that rate of downloads was still accelerating. "The numbers are extraordinary," Garland says. "This is a very high level of torrent activity even for an immensely popular game title."

    (End quote)

     

    Something is motivating an "extraordinary" number of people to pirate this game.  Therefore, there is something that separates it from even other "immensely popular" games.  If it’s not the DRM, then I’d like to hear what Mr. Campbell thinks it IS.  If it were just about "the sort of cheap fuck who wants something for nothing" then people wouldn’t be pirating Spore any more than any other game.

    I’m not advocating piracy.  I haven’t pirated Spore, and I don’t intend to.  But neither do I intend to buy it.  And the reason I don’t intend to buy it is the DRM.

  11. 0
    wiregr says:

    Everyone seems to be complaining about the 3 install limit, but I think the biggest problem with Spore’s DRM is Securom itself. This software is no different from malware: It installs itself without users’ permission, hides its’ tracks, and interferes (sometimes severely) with the way in which the computer operates. Not to mention that it takes a reformat or a tech savvy user with the patience of a saint to remove it. The torrented version lacks both the securom malware AND the install limit. Gee EA, I wonder which copy would users rather play?

    I was really looking forward to Spore since it was first announced, but no matter how amazing and revolutionary this game may or may not be, it’s not worth infecting my computer with trash software just for the "privilege" of playing the game which I paid for.

  12. 0
    G.A. says:

    Personally, I bought GalCiv 2 mainly because it didn’t require a CD key to play or even the CD. The same with SoaSE. That simple gesture of good faith on their part got them a returning customer. I regret that I bought Spore mainly because I have it installed on my PC and my sister’s PC so we can both play it, which means we have only one install left between the two of us. What happens if my PC craps out or her PC craps out or it gets a virus or I upgrade my PC or get a laptop that can run it or something else, what, buy another copy of the game? Spend another $50? Hell no, I’m gonna download the pirated version. Because the pirated version has the stuff the customers should be getting in the first place. And I am sure that many PC gamers out there have similar situations of having a good gaming rig and family or whatever. Therefore, yes, the DRM encourages piracy.

    I honestly feel sorry for Will Wright because this fiasco is really ruining an otherwise really good game.

  13. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Crysis was pirated a lot for one simple reason: it was too damn expensive. Casual players couldn’t afford to shell out $1000 or whatever in order to play the game the way it was meant to be played so why buy it if the selling point was really the graphics? First you pay $1000 to be able to play it and then you have to shell out another $50 to play the game you payed $1000 to play? In other words, when it came out, Crysis cost $1050 to play, not $50. Many people upgraded their PCs just to play Crysis. And even nobody pirated it the sales still wouldn’t have been especially high because it was targeted at the high-end crowd. Stardocks games on the other hand usually have relatively low requirements.

    This is why I predict that Crysis: Warhead will do relatively better; it has lower requirements and price.

     

     

     

  14. 0

    Anyone with a basic understanding of human psychology knows that DRM is fundamentally designed to control people’s lives, people don’t like businesses trying to control their lives, and people don’t buy things from businesses they don’t like if they can help it. Piracy keeps getting easier, DRM keeps getting harder, and as these companies spend more and more money for more and more specialised expertise… eventually it will simply not be worth it.

    Have patience. You don’t have to fight or protest or demonstrate or boycott. Just let nature take its course. We have been through this before. In the early days of PC gaming, you had to use the original disk to start the game, and people hated it so they found ways around it. Eventually, that practice went away.

    It will happen again. DRM is a Bad Idea. You don’t need to convince anyone or prove anything; it just is. If people want to chase that dead-end technology, let them. Meanwhile, you can either scoop up their unhappy customers with your own DRM-free product, or enjoy DRM-free products from businesses who already know it’s a Bad Idea.

    If you really, really want a DRM-encumbered product, should you boycott? No! This is all about you, remember? You should get what you want, DRM or no. Go right on out and buy the product. Don’t take any kind of political stance or alter your life to meet some principle about DRM. It’s an objectively bad idea. Just let people do what they do, and DRM will die – eventually – as the result of human action, but without requiring human intent.

    That’s the great thing about bad ideas. You can just leave them alone, and eventually they die… all by themselves.

  15. 0
    JS says:

    The only way I would touch Spore would be to actually go out, buy the game, then turn around and get the pirated version. That *seems* like the best way out, considering that against all possible logic the pirate version is held to be superior to the official release.

    I’m afraid I haven’t followed the laws too closely. Isn’t there a law against circumventing the DRM? I can probably guarantee it’s in the EULA in any case, so even this way out is probably "illegal" despite EA still getting their money.

    Too bad. Looked like an interesting game, too, in its own way.

  16. 0
    CK20XX says:

    It’s extremely difficult to argue that going without Spore is some kind of suffering though.  It’s a good game worth anyone’s time, sure, but it’s not the awesome life simulator we were promised.  (Personally, I think if it were, everyone would just complain that it was too drawn out.)  And even the most hyped up and flawless games are ultimately accessories that we can do without.

    I can understand broader options making piracy much more appealing.  I’m just not sure it excuses it.

  17. 0
    mogbert says:

    Something else just occured to me.

    When BioShock was released, there was the same complaints about the DRM. At the time, a lot of it was put down to the idea that it was the pirates that were complaining because the DRM hadn’t been cracked yet.

    However, I would like to point out that the DRM hasn’t caused any problems for the pirates of Spore. For the pirates, a crack to break super restrictive DRM is just as easy to apply as a standard no-dvd crack. They don’t have the three install limits, or any other problems, so I don’t think they are the ones complaining. The mob that this person is referring to is composed mostly of those who have bought the game legally or would have preferred to buy the game legally but haven’t due to the DRM. The pirates don’t really need any publicity or public outcry, it doesn’t do anything for them one way or another.

    That means that these complaints are mostly made of the very people EA should be listening to. These are the future sales that are up for grabs. These are the ones saying they don’t want to pirate games.

  18. 0
    Anonymous says:

    We must be reading in different places, since I’ve seen those advocating piracy because of DRM roundly shouted down by those calling for boycott instead.

    Companies consider cracks piracy too, even if that’s what you wind up having to use to run the game you bought.

    DRM encourages piracy, even if it’s one person who decides to do so.  Whether this is due to problems it causes or restrictions it imposes or ethics it violates, it cannot be argued.  It’s truth.

  19. 0
    sqlrob says:

    Let’s call EA’s 1% correct, for now.

    That’s 1% in what, a week? Assuming that’s constant, over 40% will have a problem by this time next year. Not so minor any more.

  20. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Did Crytek expect people to plonk down dollars just to find out what they thought could run the game couldn’t?

    The EdgeOnline dude has it wrong:  DRM promotes the loss of ACTUAL sales – people who would’ve bought but didn’t because of crippling DRM.  Whether they boycott or pirate after making that decision really doesn’t matter if they’ve been previously burned or pushed away by ridiculous after-sale terms that they won’t accept.

    Calling those that didn’t BUY because of DRM ‘cheap f***s’ just highlights the hateful attitude people feel from companies they’d pay for games once upon a time.

  21. 0
    Anonymous says:

    And this mob-pandering argument that DRM encourages piracy? Please. What encourages piracy is dishonesty. Either you’re the sort of cheap f**k who wants something for nothing, or you’re not.

    I completely agree with him here, most of the anti-DRM comments I find online seem to come from those who just want to justify their own greed and immoral actions(i.e. "I wasn’t going to buy it anyway" and "they won’t miss out on one person like me not paying them" while on a torrent of a thousand others who feel the same).  Things like this just makes them more vocal…

    Granted I hate DRM as well, like for example the limited number of Windows XP reinstalls and just what happens when Microsoft stops supporting it(I have a legit CD-key and can reinstall my legit copy of 98SE…), but it hasn’t encouraged me to pirate things.  I use alternatives(i.e. Open Source/freeware) or don’t use/play the darned thing at all.  At most, maybe sometime down the line I will have to get an online-activation crack.

    If you don’t like their DRM, do NOT buy or pirate it, and do NOT fool yourself into thinking that such unethical actions by these companies justifies your own unethical actions.

  22. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Spore is only licensed (according to EA)? When Autodesk lost to the First Sale Doctrine I didn’t think that sort of lie would still be around.

    No matter what EA claims everyone bought the game and has the right to install it as many times they want on as many computers they want as long as they only actively use the software on a single computer at any given time. They also have the right to resell a valid copy.

    The idea that a customer must be dependant on EA telephone support to future installs is ridiculous. As someone who still has the diskette from my original copy of Skyfox (an EA release) I would be amazed if anyone in the phone center has ever heard of the game. If it had DRM similar to Spore then I would have a useless diskette due to no fault of my own, just EA deciding the game is too old to support. Do they have an option to return install disks for a refund after they decide a game is too old? Let me try to remember how many computers I have owned since a Macintosh 128k or was it 512k? No matter it is definately more than three computers.

  23. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Modern society – at least here in the U.S. – doesn’t like being inconvienced, even to make a stand on an issue they feel strongly about.

    So to some of these people, pirating a game looks like boycotting without the pesky problem of not getting to play the game.

    Of course, those that choose this route fail to consider that they are reinforcing the argument of these corporations that DRM is necessary to prevent piracy.  (The ironic part being, of course, that DRM does not prevent piracy.*)

    That said, I’m not sure a boycott would ever work, as there always seem to be plenty of people who are either uninformed, don’t care about the DRM, or aren’t willing to go without the game – and purchase it anyway.

     

    *Recent DRM methods seem designed not to prevent piracy but to undermine the secondhand market, but this is a stance that corporations cannot publicly take.  The reason for this is book publishing companies tried this at the turn of the twentieth century, and the result was the First Sale doctrine – which game publishing companies are now trying to circumvent by using "preventing piracy" as a smokescreen.  Until this ethically (and legally) dubious way of gouging customers is shut down by the justice system, I very strongly recommend a boycott of any game with an installation limit.

  24. 0
    Austin_Lewis says:

    Simple. In days when the only method of getting a product was purchase, you either had to suffer through the negative effects (DRM) or suffer through lack of the product.  These days, if you don’t want to suffer through the absolute bullshit that is Spore’s DRM, you have a myriad of options.  The DS version.  A pirated version.  Cracking the game (I’m not sure this is an option yet, but I know it will be in the future).  You no longer have to suffer just to make a statement; you can enjoy the game and not give EA a cent.

  25. 0
    mogbert says:

    I disagree with his premise, if I had the time, I’d pull up that fallacy webpage and pull out the fallacies in his argument. Basically he tries to boil the concept of a piracy down to his own definition that pirates are unethical under any circumstances and only do it because they want it for free.

    The easiest way to disprove a theory like that is to take it to extremes. If the best game in the world was offered for $1, free instant delivery, you could pay any way you wanted including in cash, but it was also available via normal piracy methods, would every person who pirated spore also pirate that game? I seriously doubt it. In fact, I think almost no one would bother pirating it because the price is more then worth it and it’s convienient. Now, again looking at limits, everything else stays the same, but it now costs one million dollars. Piracy reaches 100%. Back to start, everything else stays the same, it’s still $1, but it can only be picked up in southern Utah, at a store behind a Denny’s that is only open on alternating Thursdays. Again, piracy reaches almost 100%.

    I postulate that the percentage of piracy is a function of value and price. Only the ones that wouldn’t pay $1, I would expect a small handfull of peole, ar ethe ethical trash that he is villifying. What is likely is that the pirated copy provides a higher value, better product and lower price, and the convienience is about equal… download time vs picking it up in the store. The amount of value the pirated copy has would go down if it wasn’t a better product, in this case if the official version wasn’t so draconian then the pirated version would be so attractive.

    Would it get rid of all of the piracy? Of course not, but the percentage of piracy would go down. While there are other factors involved, I beleive Sins of the Solar Empire follows this theory. By the pirated version not having a better product then the official version, it was able to keep it’s value quotient high, and had better sales.

    I’ve taken cold medicine, so I’m hoping this sound as good on (e-)paper as it did in my head…

  26. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Agreed, I am perfectly happy with a system that forces me only to play originals of games, I don’t have a problem with that at all, it’s not really the intention that annoys me, it’s the method, and the fact that EA seem to have taken a perfectly sound concept (stopping piracy) and asked themselves ‘How else can we exploit the market with this?’

    The problem with programs like Securom is that you would only trust them if you could see the source code, and if you could see the source code, there’d be no point to their existence, so it’s safer not to trust them. Dongles are the biggest waste of a USB port ever invented, and things like Starforce are, in reality, too unreliable on a number of drive-makes for them to have been seriously considered as a contender by a distributor who wants to make a game as widely compatible as possible. Egosoft take note, not one of their games has run properly or reliably until the Starforce was removed. I paid for both X3 and Warhammer:Mark of Chaos+Battle March. They all needed ‘updating’ with no-disk patches for me to play them (Though, in fairness to them, they removed it from X3 after a while, and will hopefully do the same with Warhammer after a period of time).

    The thing with EA is that they can’t even agree with themselves, managers at EA are saying that DRM is the wrong way to go, but it seems like no-one in Marketting and Distribution is actually listening to them.

    My own opinion is that CD Keys are the best bet still, admittedly, they don’t directly reduce piracy, but then, neither do these newer, more draconian measures, but once a Key is tagged as ‘Bad’, it’s every bit as effective, since you still cannot go online or update a game if the key is suspect. Anything on top of that is really an over-the-top measure, since someone who prepared to use a dodgy Disc Key isn’t going to have a problem with installing no-cd patches and other hacks for more complex systems.

     

  27. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Crysis sold well, though perhaps not as well as it could have.  What contributed to increased piracy of Crysis, I suspect, was their "It might run on your computer in 2050. Maybe." advertising campaign.

    Designing games to run on systems that only a small percentage of potential customers actually own is a fundamentally flawed concept.  Doesn’t make the piracy right, but there you go.

    No good solution? I suppose that depends on what you’re looking for a solution to. If you want customer loyalty and increased sales, remove the restrictive DRM, get active in the community, and publish good games. They’ll be pirated – it’s unavoidable – but you’ll still turn a profit.

    If you’re looking to stop piracy altogether, though? The solution is simple. Stop publishing games – that’s the only way it’ll happen.

  28. 0
    Insanejedi says:

    DRM is usually not targeted to the hardcore pirate, it is targeted to the casual pirate. What I mean by that is the people who (Insert don’t copy that floppy song) in the new age. CD Key’s were used to prevent games from simply being burnt and used to another computer, same with online verification, CD verification, Starforce and what not. Some work better then others but none of these solutions are ever good at even shutting out the casual pirate who goes to his freinds house to burn CD’s while not crippling somewhat of the actual ligit user. Stardock’s method only really works for Stardock because they rely on the hardcore enthusiest to buy their games because it’s good, and their loyal customers who buy 4X games, thats why they don’t have DRM because they don’t need it. The people who download Gal Civ 2 would probebly not have bought it anyways. However Crytek with Crysis got burned badly, and that game in my mind had no serious draconian DRM yet they were getting stabbed, enough to make them forgoe PC all together and now they are working strictly multi-platform for all other Crytek games.

    There is no good solution to this problem. Period.

  29. 0
    CK20XX says:

    Either you’re the sort of cheap f**k who wants something for nothing, or you’re not.

    To resort to swear words is to abandon one’s credibility.

    Yes, the DRM is leading to piracy.  That’s obvious and it would be foolish to deny it.  But I don’t entirely agree with piracy so I think a different question needs to be asked, one that’s more about social values in this day and age.

    That question is: why piracy in particular?  Whatever happened to the olden days of boycotts?  It would be stronger and more upright to simply refuse to buy the game and not seek to get it through other means.  But in this day and age, the lovable rogues are heavily romanticized and rebelling for various reasons carries a delicious flavor.  Choosing to pirate does indeed say something about the individual, but the widespread appeal of piracy says something about our modern social values.

    What would that be, and why?  Can anyone help answer?  Serious responses only, please.

  30. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I agree with the editor. I’ve gone through 4 computers since I’ve started PC gaming in 97. The amount of times I’ve reinstall Starcraft, C&C, Doom, Diablo (all of them), etc etc, is well above 10 times. Due to, forced reformating my hard drive, upgrading to Windows 2000, xp and sadly vista and having to downgrade again, unexpected viruses. The list is goes on.

    It is sad that EA assumes no one will ever reformat, no one will ever get a virus so bad you have to reinstall windows, or upgrading your OS, that they believe they are just with having an only 3 install per copy.

    Not only is it the 3 install per copy, it’s the 1 account per copy. So, if my little sister wants to play it, she has to go out and fork over another $60.

    Even Microsoft isn’t that stupid.

     

  31. 0
    chadachada(123) says:

    If my pc could handle spore, i wouldve pirated it. As it stands, I’m more of a console gamer, but still play diablo II on here sometimes. I’ve installed that a good 7 times before.

    I’d like to play spore, and I’m not dealing with Suckurom. Therefore, the only way to play the game is by pirating. makes sense to me.

  32. 0
    Anonymous (The Poster) says:

    Sorry it lookslike a single block of text, I think happened due to my noscript plugin getting reset, if not… not sure what happened. Suppose to be four paragraphs and a line…

    -Fixed at least?

  33. 0
    Austin_Lewis says:

    I’m not going to lie, if I wanted to play spore I would pirate it rather than let EA games damage my computers.  Fuck them anyway, what they did to Will Wright’s game is a damn shame.

  34. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I have yet to pirate a commercially available game. From disks on the C64 till now with big fancy DVDs, all the new games that come out I want I find a way to buy, or get bought for me(Holidays you know.) When I do go after an out of print game, I try to pick it up elsewhere, or on rerelease (like the SimLife I now have sitting on my shelf in 3.5″ glory). Occasionally I have given the thought to piracy when I have no cash and a new game is out I really wanna play. Never did.

    And now there is Spore. I want spore, I have money for Spore, but, I do not want to BUY Spore. I have money and means, and this time I am thinking of pirating it. I am not the only game player in my house, and to have to create a new email and EA account just so me and my bro can play? I am also working on a brand new self-built vista box, in the past three weeks of ownership, including evac for Gustav, I have reinstalled the OS about 6 times, Bioshock 5, STALKER 3, and CIV4 twice trying to get Vista to work the way I wanted. If I had just gotten my computer parts and Spore this week, or last, I would find myself out of installs already.

    I have games I CANNOT play, due to the DRM on them not being compatible with my DVD Burner because I might use it to pirate the game? I would most likely download it in that case, I mean, really. And then there is one game I have that I cannot install on my new computer because the DRM is not Vista compatible. THE FREAKING DRM IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH VISTA, even if the GAME is not. What happens if Spore cannot be installed in Windows 7 because the DRM does not work, yet the pirates are happily playing the DRM free game they didn’t spend money on, while I am burning Spore and a wax figure of the EA building while chanting dark rituals because I payed 60 bucks for a game that no longer works? Heck I am not even talking about the game being to old here, but the DRM.

    In short, yea, I can see why DRM may lead people into the world of piracy, and to think, it is the people who pay that loose out, and the pirates that win. Thank you very much.

    -A touch bitter

  35. 0
    E. Zachary Knight says:

    AS much as I like Edge, I have disagreed with just about everything this man has ever written. This guy does not look on customers with any amount of respect. His only support goes to the games industry.

    This is not an opinion based on this one article. This is an opinion based around reading over a years worth of this man’s writing.

    He hates customers.

    E. Zachary Knight
    http://www.editorialgames.com
    Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
    MySpace Page: http://www.myspace.com/okceca
    Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1325674091


    E. Zachary Knight
    Divine Knight Gaming
    Oklahoma Game Development
    Rusty Outlook
    Random Tower
    My Patreon

  36. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I think the point is for people to point out that the DRM has nothing whatsoever to do with preventing Piracy, and has everything to do with removing the resale value of the goods you have bought, which is what it is designed to do.

    EA weren’t targetting pirates with DRM, they are trying to cripple the second-hand computer game market, anti-piracy was just an excuse. A lot of people clicked onto that quite early in the deal, so why pay for something when it has been designed to obliterate its own resale value?

  37. 0
    JustChris says:

    You acknowledge that this is a problem but don’t suggest a possible solution. You only point out that the most popular solution is the wrong one. So it feels like this is going to be a damned-if-you-do or don’t situation. Well, not totally because the effect on piracy will result in two different possible outcomes. But neither of them would involve backing down from using DRM.

    If piracy goes up or stays the same, EA would want to develop a stronger DRM, maybe with a few more usage restrictions.

    If piracy goes down, EA’s reaction to that is "The DRM worked, it’s a proof of concept." and they will put it in more games in the future.

  38. 0
    Michael PN ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    Here is what actually happened when Mr. Campbell responded to the DRM Spore issue, as EA representatives were there to hear. . .

    "The anti-DRM crowd. They have a point, but then it gets lost by mob-insanity… They get mad about EA only offering three installs for Spore. I don’t know many people who install games on three computers, but I dare say it’s a few. EA says 1%. OK. That’s a significant number of people, all in all. . ."

    *Colin Campbell receives a check courtesy of EA. . .*

    ". . .They ought to be offered some more options. . ."

    *EA takes back check from hand.*

    "I agree that the DRM solutions currently in use are often frustrating and damage publishers. They need to be improved. Customers need to be heard. Action needs to be taken. EA needs to address these issues one by one."

    *EA ready to buyout Edge Magazine. . .*

    "But there’s also a nasty sort of relativism going on here, that is weakening the position of those protestors who have a genuine grievance… And this mob-pandering argument that DRM encourages piracy? Please. What encourages piracy is dishonesty. Either you’re the sort of cheap f**k who wants something for nothing, or you’re not."

    *EA happy, EA not give check, instead gives Campbell a can of Sunkist and 2 Twizzlers, and buyouts Edge Magazine.*

     

     

  39. 0
    Anonymous says:

    You’re right that pirating isn’t made legit by the DRM. However, the argument is that SecuROM IS definitely encouraging and broadening the users who are pirating this game.

    There are a number of gamers I know who would have actually paid for this game because they liked Will Wright games and were excited about the prospect of Spore. However, since understanding how the DRM works, some have gone the pirating route. Again, people who otherwise would have purchased the game legally made a choice to pirate it based on this issue. This is the specific argument that editor from Edge Online is refuting quite erroneously.

    Personally, I’m just not going to get it at all…I’m turned off by the whole mess.

  40. 0
    insanejedi says:

     

    I find it funny that you dismiss people having knee jerk reactions towards people who report on games in a negative fashion when you are all doing the same thing to EA and whoever argue’s for EA. Some people even thought I was paid by EA. Yea, I’m being paid 50 000$ to argue in favour of EA on some independent political game site owned by the ECA. Has the possibility ever occured to you that some people maybe, possibly, disagree with your opinions?

    Yes DRM sucks, yes EA has issues, however I still think you are all overreacting to all of this, especially the ones saying saying that "I pirate Spore because it has DRM." because that really does not solve anything.

  41. 0
    JustChris says:

    DRM does encourage piracy. And it’s not due to the nature of DRM but the mindset of the code-crackers.

    Basically, if you build a bomb, they’ll try to build a bigger bomb. Or something to neutralize it. Repeat ad nauseum.

  42. 0
    bpm195 says:

     The DRM doesn’t encourage piracy, it encourages not buying the game. Not agreeing to the abusive terms set forth by EA is a reason not to enter into contract with them. It doesn’t give you reason to steal from them.

    While pirating the game may be done as an act of civil disobedience, that doesn’t make it right. 

  43. 0
    Solipsis says:

    He’s right when he says that wild-eyed, frothing-at-the-mouth internet fanaticism isn’t likely to produce the kinds of changes we’d like to see.

    He’s wrong in saying that only people normally inclined to piracy are pirating Spore. I’m very anti-piracy, but the option to remove all these restrictions is tempting. Much more appetizing than not playing Spore at all…

  44. 0
    oto kirlama says:

    I’m all for freedom of ttnet vitamin speech and allowing rent a car game makers to put whatever they want in games, but there’s one thing about this app that has me scratching my head.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but from araç kiralama the previous article araba kiralama on this I gathered that players can use Google maps in-game to find the other (real-life?) dealers in their area.  If this is the case, has travesti anyone considered what’s stopping someone from using this app to actually move drugs between hands for reals?

    But majority araba kiralama of their outrage araç kiralama stems from what it could DO TO children, not the content itself.  Talk to one of these people and you’ll find they don’t think any books kiralık araba should be banned from children.  Mention American Psycho and they talk about kiralık araç the redeeming value of using imagination to construct a story.  Reading, no matter what the content, is largely viewed as a consequenceless activity for people of any age.  The reason why I mention American Psycho is because of the content itself.  Gaming never has and likely never will have any scenes where someone has sex with a severed head.  Not gonna happen.  Yet despite this, they’ll fight tooth and nail to protect their children from two boys kissing in Bully but whatever they read is harmless… yeah.

    The entire arguement is kiralık oto based upon a social normality inflicted by luddites who can’t figure out the controls for Halo so it’s frightening and terrifying and obviously the cause of youth violence on the rise even though, in reality, it’s in decline (which is actually a HUGE suprise given minibüs kiralama the economies status).  In  a perfect world, we would have parents that actually parent.  The idea of sales restrictions on media on oto kiralama any form to accomidate parental unwillingness to get involved with their child’s life is the real problem to me.  Here I am, 32 years old, and being held up at a self-scan rent a car needing to show ID before I can buy a $10 M rated game all because Soccer Momthra can’t be bothered to look at the crap Billy Genericallystupidson does in his free time.  It’s too hard for her, so I have to suffer?

  45. 0
    oto kirlama says:

    I’m all for freedom of ttnet vitamin speech and allowing rent a car game makers to put whatever they want in games, but there’s one thing about this app that has me scratching my head.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but from araç kiralama the previous article araba kiralama on this I gathered that players can use Google maps in-game to find the other (real-life?) dealers in their area.  If this is the case, has travesti anyone considered what’s stopping someone from using this app to actually move drugs between hands for reals?

    But majority araba kiralama of their outrage araç kiralama stems from what it could DO TO children, not the content itself.  Talk to one of these people and you’ll find they don’t think any books kiralık araba should be banned from children.  Mention American Psycho and they talk about kiralık araç the redeeming value of using imagination to construct a story.  Reading, no matter what the content, is largely viewed as a consequenceless activity for people of any age.  The reason why I mention American Psycho is because of the content itself.  Gaming never has and likely never will have any scenes where someone has sex with a severed head.  Not gonna happen.  Yet despite this, they’ll fight tooth and nail to protect their children from two boys kissing in Bully but whatever they read is harmless… yeah.

    The entire arguement is kiralık oto based upon a social normality inflicted by luddites who can’t figure out the controls for Halo so it’s frightening and terrifying and obviously the cause of youth violence on the rise even though, in reality, it’s in decline (which is actually a HUGE suprise given minibüs kiralama the economies status).  In  a perfect world, we would have parents that actually parent.  The idea of sales restrictions on media on oto kiralama any form to accomidate parental unwillingness to get involved with their child’s life is the real problem to me.  Here I am, 32 years old, and being held up at a self-scan rent a car needing to show ID before I can buy a $10 M rated game all because Soccer Momthra can’t be bothered to look at the crap Billy Genericallystupidson does in his free time.  It’s too hard for her, so I have to suffer?

  46. 0
    Motionless says:

    So by his own argument, DRM is pointless. If I fall into the category of those who DON’T expect something for nothing, then I would have purchased the game even if it were DRM free.

    So let’s get to the truth. Piracy is nothing more than a Red Herring. DRM is no longer being used by companies like EA to curb piracy. After all, DRM has never protected even a single game from being pirated. So think about it.  Why then would EA and other companies continue to pour money into a failed system?

    Why? Because it’s true purpose has not failed. This DRM ruse is all leading down the path of bilking more money out of normal, non-pirating customers. Soon, you’ll need to re-purchase a game once the activation limit has been reached. Or perhaps we’ll be paying a small activation fee per install… all in the name of protecting against "piracy" of course.

    For anyone to even think that EA is using DRM to fight piracy is naive at best.  I see the future.  It’s a future of software that will nickel and dime it’s paying customers to death.

  47. 0
    Spartan ( User Karma: 0 ) says:


    There is relativism going on with the statistics used methinks.

     

    Additionally DRM does in fact inspire copyright infringement. I know this to be true from years of empirical knowledge.

     

  48. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I bought a new computer just to play Crysis.

     

    Seriously, my soul (watch Yatzee’s review of crysis) for a computer powerful enough to run crysis.  It was worth it, every single penny and part of my soul! 

    I have a computer powerful enough to run Spore at super max settings.  Would I get it?  No.  Is it because of DRM?  No, its not the main reason I’m not getting it.. but its part of it. 

    Its the fact that the game sucks.  Seriously sucks.  Call me ignorant, but of all the hype and everything that went into the game, it seriously came up so short of what it was intended to be…

    Then you got the whole DRM ontop of it.. sheesh, more head-aches just to play an over-rated videogame, no thanks.

  49. 0
    It Came From Monday ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I bought Spore the other day. It’s still shrink-wrapped. I’ve been happily playing my pirated copy since I bought it.

    I look at games the same way I look at a book, or a movie. I have no right to copy it for someone, but I do have the right to loan it to my little brother if I so choose. I have the right to install it as many times as is necessary for it to continue to run. I have the right to install it while avoiding a malicious, irremovable virus from my computer.

    EA, I am a pirate. Your choice of DRM made me one: Until you change your DRM and the number of installs, Spore will be the last title I buy from you. The concept of paying you to go and download a title disgusts me. The only reason I did so was because I’ve been looking forward to Spore for so long.

    No more. You have no titles to lure me like this lured me. Get rid of the DRM, or you’ve gotten rid of me as a customer. All I want is to be able to install one of your games as many times as I like down the road, and to do so without worrying about the damage doing so will inflict on my computer.

  50. 0
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  51. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I like this guys response to the criticism, which basically adds up to:

    ‘I’m not sure if I’m right, but anyone who disagrees must therefore have pirated the game.’

    He’s been deliberately missing the point since the start, no reason to expect him to get it now I suppose.

  52. 0
    Weatherlight says:

    Its not so much encouraging piracy {by my definition}, however it is forcing owners of the game to download the pirated version in order to actually play the game. Which the industry does consider piracy.

    I know of at least two people who bought spore, which is now sitting on the shelf in its original package unopened, because they opted to install the cracked version they could download off of the internet because when a friend attempted to install it it hosed up the computer it was being installed on.

    Despite popular belief, I think people prefer to pay for software/movies/music provided it is convenient. That is really what I think it comes down to is a matter of convenience. Is it easier to go to the store and buy it or is it easier to download it off the net.

    ~Weatherlight~

  53. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    "A cheap fuck who wants something for nothing"

    Really?  No.  I’m a person who, when I buy a game, want it to actually FUCKING WORK.

    There are documented issues with the DRM used in Mass Effect, Spore, and the rest of EA’s future catalogue.  It refuses to believe that a certain subset of the population has internet.

    I pirated Mass Effect because I bought it, and couldn’t get it to run.

    I would have purchased Spore, if I hadn’t known that the DRM issue I was having hadn’t been fixed.

    Go fuck yourself.

  54. 0
    the1jeffy says:

    Harr, harr, harrr!

    This scury bilge-rat be makin’ my day!  He be smokin’ something ripe, and I be wantin’ in on it!  What be the diffrence between terror on the high seas, and takin’ booty fer spoutin’ another man’s words as yer own!  At least us sea-dogs aren’t hidin’ our intentions – we aim to cheat, lie, steal and plunder!   By Blackbeard’s ghost, don’t be givin’ in to the EA’s Navy – don’t allow any of yer hard won booty ta end up in their tarnished coffers. 

    (Please note, I am not advocating piracy.  I am advocating, however, not buying the game, and telling both EA and Will Wright to go keelhaul themselves loudly, publicly, and repeatedly.  If you bought the game, you are part of the problem.  If you pirate the game, you are part of the problem.  Period.)

    ~~All Knowledge is Worth Having~~

  55. 0
    Anonymous says:

    The freeing up activations is a new thing and likely in response to the outrage over Spore; doesn’t apply to MEPC or Spore…yet.  As of right now, there is no way to ‘revoke’ activations for those games.  You use your 3 then you have to call EA for one more.

    Maybe they’ll even give you one.

  56. 0
    Krono says:

    The thing is, even if uninstalling the game does free up the install in the current version of SecuRom, that’s neither a gurantee of it working properly every time (therefore costing you an install), that you’ll be able to uninstall it before reformating, nor a guarantee that EA won’t shut down the servers.

    Also this doesn’t address the other problems associated with SecuRom such as it installing itself silently, without your permisson, cases were it screws up your computer and so forth.

    -Gray17

  57. 0
    Pug says:

    I keep reading about the 3 installs… and I tried to read up on it… the only actual answer I found from EA was on the Red Alert 3 forums where it was pointed out that if you uninstall the game it will free up the licence.  Which means the only time you actually will have a problem is if you format the machine without uninstall… and this would have to happen 3 times before you have to contact EA.

    Also hasnt EA has backed off and said they will make it so you can free up the licence yourself online?

    Given these two points does it put anyones mind at ease?

    Im not claiming to know the ins and outs of it all (or to care right now) I just see a lot of screaming and very little in the way of facts (from both sides).

  58. 0
    Zaruka ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    i hate ea now i got the crap on my computer becuse of crysis warhead lucky it not as strick as spore is but if i have anyproblems i find a way to remove it then i wait for a crack. lucky it does not have it for the crysis wars …i think i cant get a staright answer to that. anyway i hope they just take the DRM off i want to buy the game but im not gonna still piss i did not find out about crysis warhead gaaaaa.\

    Thanks

    Zaruka

  59. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    The last time they put caps on gasoline prices, there were no gas signs everywhere…

    While I love nothing more than harping on the government, it’s a more complicated issue than that.

  60. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    It’s okay, with the state of the economy over here, which all the smart aylist know it is because of high gas prices, pirating is going to be far more common.  We can’t afford $50 games, and $5/gallon of gas.  We need to work to pay other bills. 

    So until the government caps the oil companies, who are making record profits not only for gas but for any company that has ever existed in the world, or gets us electric cars again, which the Chevy Volt is a glorified HYBRID someone tried to argue that with me the other day…  …car companies make more money buy making cars that use gas, electrinic theft will become more common.

    I blame Washington for taking bribes from the oil companies, and screwing the American public.

  61. 0
    Ace ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    *looks around room and counts*

    I’ve got 5 computers in here…3 stationary, 2 laptops shared by 3 different people. Spore on each of them and that’s my RENTAL INSTALLS gone.

    Yo ho me hardies, set sail ‘fer torrent isles!

  62. 0
    LuNaTiC says:

     

     

    IT’S NOT ABOUT INSTALLING ON 3 SEPERATE COMPUTERS, EA!!!  IT’S ABOUT ONLY BEING ABLE TO INSTAL 3 TIMES ON  ONE FRIGGIN COMPUTER!!!  That’s why we say it’s like RENTING A GAME!  Not only that, YOU CAN ONLY HAVE ONE F’ING ACCOUNT PER COPY!!!

    You’re right, I don’t know anyone who has 3 computers in one house, but I do know people who format their harddrive when doing computer maintenence on a monthly basis, LIKE ME AND EVERY OTHER COMPUTER GEEK!  WTF is WRONG WITH YOU!?!?!?  STOP JERKING US AROUND, YOU ARE IN THE WRONG ON THIS ONE!!!  YOUR DRM FILLS MY COMPUTER WITH CRAP THAT I HAVE TO FORMAT TO GET RID OF.  There is NO game worth having to deal with your ristrictions.

     

  63. 0
    Crowster says:

    "Only 1% of our customers ever try to install the game on more than 3 machines"

    Where did that statistic come from? A three month sampling using the launch of the Spore Creature Creator. That statistic doesn’t mean that only 1% EVER try to install on more than 3 machines, it means that only 1% tried to install on more than 3 machines IN A PERIOD OF 3 MONTHS. It’s not the first 3 months of release that most people are upset about. That is a terrible statistic, and completely misses the point. People are not worried about wanting to play their game immediately after purchasing it; people want to be able to play their game 3 or 4 years down the road.

    Counting reformats and new computers, my completely legal copy of Sims 2 has been installed on FIVE machines. 4 years, 5 activations. Two PCs in the household to start with, PC two needed to be reformatted, then both PCs were upgraded once. If the "new graphics card" thing actually takes an install away, which I’ve heard conflicting information about, then that would bring my total up to 6, TWICE the number that I’m allowed to for Spore and, most likely, future EA titles.

    Having to call to get more activations is unacceptable. It’s a hastle, and even if you were guaranteed to get the activation when you call (which you aren’t), it would still keep me from wanting to buy the product. I have dealt with EA’s tech support in the past, and I don’t wish to go through that again. I don’t want to have to explain my case when all I want to do is install my game, like a teenager having to explain why they were home late last night.

    The legal customers should be rewarded, not punished, for wanting to give EA their money.

    Can’t they at least put the installs on a timer? If they are going to take a sampling of people in a 3 month period, then have your activation limit reset after 3 months. Problem solved, or at least dramatically improved.

  64. 0
    Anonymous says:

    "I actually don’t play too many PC games anymore for exactly this reason."

    I’m the same way.  It’s hard to get excited about games when they often have restrictive DRM that interferes with installation, that causes crashes and that turns the game from a thing I own into a rental.  Personally, I’m spending less and less time playing video games and more and more time going back to hobbies where I actually own the thing I’m spending my time with.

  65. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    No, they are the same.  Their recent actions prove they are the same.  Don’t think that them putting more money into their PR department to counter their bad business practices toward their consumers is them being a better company.  They may treat other companies a little better, but they are screwing their consumers more than ever.

  66. 0
    vellocet says:

    Since I had my first job, I started buying ALL my games. But more and more, I’ve started to pirate.

    Not because I’m a "cheap @$$" or whatever, but because the pirated product is easier to use.  The point is not how many installs I get, the point is that I want the superior product. Currently, the superior product is the one without DRM, which unfortunately is the one I have to break the law to get.

    Well… I actually don’t play too many PC games anymore for exactly this reason.

    I just wanted to mention that EA Hate-Boyism is not in style anymore.  5 years ago yes, but grow up.  EA screwed a lot of companies in the past, but they’re not the same anymore.

  67. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    StarCraft – 5 installs 3 computers
    SimTower – 8 installs 4 computers
    SimCity2000 – 6 installs 3 computers
    Sims 2 – 6 installs 2 computers
    Black and White 2 – 2 installs 1 computer
    SimCity 4 – 4 installs 2 computers
    organ trail – 12 installs 6 computers (yes, i still play it)

    Yeah, I still play my games, and I reinstall them a lot too.  I reformat my hard drive every year or so.  Sims 2 I had to uninstall once because the game got jacked up because of a mod…  But you get the point.  Some of us reformat often, others play the games for a long time, and a few do both, like crazy.  (organ trail is my example here, haha)

  68. 0
    Anonymous says:

    I’m not a cheap f*** who wants something for nothing – on the contrary, I often waste money – lots of it – on stuff that I can easily do without.  But I’m being encouraged by EA to go to the pirates.  Why?  Because their product has no DRM and I can install it any number of times I want.  I’d gladly pay the pirates the $60 that I refuse to give EA for their rental, but the pirates aren’t asking for any money.

  69. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    No EA is even worse, they get the consumers to pay them to do the work for them, by the consumer making the creatures for them instead of populating the game themselves.  So yeah…  They could have easily of made the ‘full demo’ for free.

    I rather be a cheap F wanting something for nothing, then be a greed A-hole who wants to get paid for getting other people to do the work for free.  (Wait, thats worse than slavery, at least slaves got food for their work.)

    Even if the people did enjoy making the creatures, it is still doing the job of EA by creating creatures, when they could have put it out for free for people to do the same thing.

  70. 0
    Chuma says:

    Given Edge magazine’s history for sucking up to the big boys, this is nothing new.  In a year of games like Portal and Braid, they gave their award for "Innovation and invention" to Halo 3, for it’s online interface.  The very first sentence being "I know all you PC gamers have seen this before…"  It stunk of politics.  I imagine this endorsement of EA is nothing better.

  71. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Well, I sorta’ agree with him. I don’t think the DRM inspires piracy. However, with that being said, with all of the SECU-Rom horror stories I’ve heard (Can’t modify root, can’t burn, et cetera) I’ve thought of downloading a cracked version myself, despite the fact that I have a completely legal copy. I personally feel it’s foolish of them to keep up the DRM when the game has ALREADY been cracked.

  72. 0
    David_Ikari says:

    Cheap people who don’t want to pay for things. I personally would not want to have to buy Spore again just because I had the audacity to install it three times. If it is piracy to crack a game and install it for a fourth time, then hoist anchors.

  73. 0
    Ace ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I do want something for my something.

    Problem is, after the three installs, the something I paid MY something for becomes nothing. Doesn’t matter if I wasn’t done with it. It becomes nothing at all.

    THEY want something for nothing (+-3 installs).

    If you pay for, say, food. You expect to be allowed to finish it. If I then come and take it away after three bites you’re going to tell me to fuck off. If you then see a way to have your cake and eat all of it without some cockbag taking it away from you wouldn’t you take that route?

    Christ…so much talk of cake!

    Anyways, it’s silly to hate pirates. Anyone that spends enough time and engages in varied activities eventually pirates something. A movie, a CD, a book, a song, old NES games and associated emulators. Piracy will never go away, ever. EVER! Stop trying to take a high ground by calling them cheap f!cks or whatnot. No one believes you.
    Yo ho me hardies.

  74. 0
    Anonymous says:

    Again I must bring up this point- Since EA’s own statistics show that only 1% install more than 3 times, then why have the limit there in the first place?

  75. 0
    Oz says:

    * Install it on your XP box (1 install)

    * Wipe the computer, install vista (2 install)

    * Realise Vista is crap and go back to XP (3 install)

    * PC becomes end of life and get a new one (now your screwed)

    What about those that like to wipe and re-image their machine every 6 months? You will get 18 months tops out of Spore till you cant play game you paid for!

  76. 0
    Zaruka ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    funny thing is the people who think the 3 install thing is not a problem are either casual pc gamers or console people who dont have to install their games, now me im awlays installing and uninstalling my games i want to play for disk space. People need to do some work before they say the 3 install thing is not a problem.

    Thanks

    Zaruka

  77. 0
    Xlorep DarkHelm says:

    What gets me is…. the audacity that the author makes suggesting installing on 3 separate computers is rare. Maybe all at once, sure. But who hasn’t bloody upgraded a computer to a newer model? Especially among gamers. So, you replace your old computer, with a newer, faster, better one and want to play your old games. Oh, wait! you hit the 3 installs limit. These will kill the limit, as would the occasional reinstall (and in the Windows world, who hasn’t reinstalled their system at least once, given enough time).

    So, let’s take the scenario of… you buy Spore, install it (1). A month later, your computer’s hard drive fails, so you replace the hard drive, reinstall Spore (2), maybe 6 months later, you start to notice your computer’s getting a bit flaky, and do a full reinstall, including Spore (3). A year down the line, you upgrade your computer to something faster, and want to install Spore on it… but you can’t. Why not? Because you already used your three installs…

    "I’m not responcabel fer my comuter’s spleling errnors." — Xlorep DarkHelm

  78. 0
    Rabidkeebler ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I’m with you there.  I just recently got a new computer, so many of these games cross over. 

    Diablo II and Lord of Destruction – 6 installs at least crossing 3 computers

    Starcraft  and Brood War – 4 Installs (2 comp)

    Warcraft III – 4 Installs (2 comp)

    Half-Life – 3 Installs on 2 computers

    Half-Life2 and first exp – 2 Installs on 2 computers

    Civilization III – 3 Installs

    Civilization IV – 2 Installs

    World of Warcraft – 2 Installs

    Titan’s Quest – 2 Installs

    Elder Scrolls Oblivion – 2 Installs

    Doom III – 3 Installs on 2 computers

     

    As you can see, I’ve got a lot going on here.  Now imagine if I had to now go out and re purchase these games because of some crappy DRM. 

     

  79. 0
    Nekowolf ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I…am honestly speechless. This is such god damn bullshit. It doesn’t encourage piracy? What? Yes it does! I mean, I’ve, hell, I think we all see it. And this bullshit about the installation matter. Games I have installed more than once (mind you, not necessarily on three computer, but just one several times), let’s see…StarCraft and it’s expansion, Brood Wars. Warcraft III. The Sims and all it’s expansions. Civilization III and it’s expansions. A few others.

    And this bit about "dishonesty" is just, well…Just look at EA. And you’re saying they’re not "dishonest" as well?

  80. 0
    Anonymous ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    He was right on one thing, dishonest caused me to do it, EA’s dishonesty, but that is another story.

    This guy didn’t get the news of how many people pirated the game compared to normal.  He is as informed as a high school voter that goes off of their parent’s party preference instead of the issues.

  81. 0
    Anonymous says:

    It’s not that they want something for nothing, it’s that they want to not be beholden to the distributor or be treated like a criminal purely for paying for the game.

    I bought Spore, and I tend to reformat once per year because of the work I do on my computer. With EA’s current policy that’s a maximum of 3-years ownership of the game before I have to go to them begging to let me re-install a game that I gave them the money for ages ago. I am not amused when pirates have no such compulsion put on them.

    If this guy got his head out of his arse and asked ‘Why are more people then ever pirating a DRM-tastic game?’, why there are new pirates because of Spore, then he might get a little further along the road.

  82. 0
    thefremen says:

     Is this anything like the column he wrote where he insisted that prohibition in no way had anything to do with the rise to power of organized crime in the first half of the century?

     

    Yes it is.

  83. 0
    Jim Strathmeyer ( User Karma: 0 ) says:

    I didn’t pirate the game because I want something for nothing, I pirated it because I paid for it and I think I deserve to play the game.

  84. 0
    Conejo says:

    This guy is an idiot.

    It’s not the 3-installs thing that’s the worst of SecuRom’s problems.  Ignoring all the other problems in favor of CONTINUALLY pushing this "3-installs is all that happens that is bad" propaganda is a detriment to credibility.  Edge Online can go to hell.

    Here are we — and yonder yawns the universe.

  85. 0
    Zen says:

    Ok, so since I bought the game before I knew about the horrible DRM, I’m a cheap F**K for wanting to actually play my game in the future.  This isn’t Blockbuster, I’m not "renting" this game.  I bought it.  I agree that it’s complete BS that you can only purchase a license to play a game, and can’t actually own it.  So in that line of thinking, I "bought" and paid for my house and car, but the state and auto manufacturer still actually own them, and can shut them down or decide how many times I can drive to work or sleep in my house. Doesn’t fly. 

    On another line, I have some pretty good examples on how, while I was screwed by the DRM (my PC will just cut off it’s web access each day now..since the day I installed it..until I restart the computer like it’s trying to stop a torrent or something, but my wife’s laptop, my 360, PS3, and Wii are all just fine and are always online..without the game on them), but other people I work with just downloaded it for free, got the game, and are playing it right now with no issue, on multiple computers in their house.  One of them even got it a few days before release! So they looked at what happened to me when I purchased the game, and pirated it instead so they can enjoy it without their PCs being riddled with the EA virus (sorry…DRM). 

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