Obama Administration Rolls Back Secrecy on Copyright Treaty

On several recent occasions, GamePolitics has reported on ACTA, the international copyright treaty being negotiated in secret by various governments, including the United States.

Here in the U.S., IP rights holders – including the video game industry – have been granted access to information concerning ACTA negotiations. John Q. Public has been shut out, however.

But the Obama administration’s promised commitment to open government appears to be pulling back the curtain on ACTA, at least a bit.

IDG reports that the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has released a six-page summary of ACTA negotiations, which have been going on behind the scenes since 2006. Gigi Sohn, President of Consumer rights group Public Knowledge praised the info release:

The dissemination of the six-page summary will help to some degree to clarify what is being discussed. At the same time, however, this release can only be seen as a first step forward. It would have been helpful had the USTR elaborated more clearly the goals the United States wants to pursue in the treaty and what proposals our government has made, particularly in the area of intellectual property rights in a digital environment.

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  1. 0
    Wolfemann says:

    Figures.  Just enough to not really tell us anything… except that they’re looking at ways to screw things up further.

    My favorite part?  The part that says they want to give border officials the ability to decide that something is infringing.  I’ve got enough horror stories already about people losing things to customs that the official didn’t approve of – I don’t need this adding to them.

    Politics, Religion, and Particle Physics http://dttaboos.wordpress.com

    Movies, Games, and other sundry entertainments http://wolfemann.wordpress.com

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