XBL Community Game Mixes Platform Action, Puzzles and Politics

We’re intrigued by Clover, a nearly-done Xbox Live Community game which its creator says was heavily influenced by the prelude to the war in Iraq.

While we don’t want to give too much away, Deejay, who heads Binary Tweed, added:

The game is loaded with references to speeches by George W. Bush and Tony Blair, as well as references to World War II and September 11th…

Clover is set in a pseudo-Tudor monarchy with a welfare state, experiencing increased security measures after an act of foreign aggression, in which the lead character’s mother has died.

To make things just a bit more interesting, the Clover web site has apparently been viewed by both the Central Intelligence Agency and the United States Army Information Systems Command.

That’s a bit spooky…

While no official launch date has been set, Clover should be available in early May for 400 XBL points.

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  1. 0
    chadachada321 says:

    "keyword searches" you say? I could probably get the FBI to look at this site using a few choice words. Bomb, terrorist, down with America…the list goes on. Oh snap, there’s a knock on my door, and a white van outside my house!

    -If an apple a day keeps the doctor away….what happens when a doctor eats an apple?-

  2. 0
    AgonThalia says:

    While it’s interesting to see the CIA and the USAISC looking into that game, there are a few points to consider before breaking out the aluminum foil hats.

    1: Both agencies monitor massive amounts of data and routinely monitor the web "chatter".

    2: Knowing a lot of intelligence type people, they have a high concentration of geeks & tech nerds in their ranks.  While most of the army has very restricted "approved only sites" web surfing priveledges, intel type agencies have a much larger range of sites they can visit on their network for research.  This could be one of those geeks using a government computer to look at that game info.

    3: Without knowing the total traffic of the site, 1 hit doesn’t make me too nervous.  My old blog used to get hits from all sorts of government agencies.  It could be the fact that I have friends in the Gov, or it could be routine algorithmic based keword searches.

    4: Lastly, this analytics screenshot doesn’t show if it’s a bot or a user. 

    Yep, I’m a skeptic about this, there seems to be no pattern or trend to suggest any weirdness.

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