Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

August 26, 2009 -

A 17 year old student detonated two pipe bombs in a San Mateo, California high school on Monday before being subdued by faculty members.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the boy was wearing a bulletproof vest and was armed with an additional eight pipe bombs, a two-foot long sword and a chainsaw. Police said that the student planned to set off the bombs and then attack survivors with the other weapons.

Gadget blog Gizmodo wonders whether there may have been a video game connection: 

If you're wondering why this is on Gizmodo—and you guys always do—it's because those weapons inherently remind me of movie and video game weapons. I'm not trying to say that video games cause violence or don't cause violence, but what I'm saying is that when a 17 year old man-child thinks he can corner his classmates while dual wielding a chainsaw and a sword probably played a lot of doom and zelda and didn't do very well in gym class, so would get tired very quickly.

A second report by the SF Chronicle describes the boy as a "techno wizard." His mother thought the bomb-making components were being used to build model rockets.


Comments

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Wait, I'm the dumbfuck because you're too stupid to figure out that he meant "legally?"  Mr. I-know-more-about-the-law-than-anyone?

Also, maybe you really are retarded, as this is about a school attack by a student, not your quest to destroy EA.  But, since you brought it up, as I said, the NFLPA gave EA the stats, as they do every year, for X amount of dollars.  Y amount of X was to be divied up amongst the players in the game.  Since the NFLPA gave EA the stats, Z amount of Y was to be given to the retired players by the NFLPA.  You know, the National Football Leage PLAYERS ASSOCIATION, also known as the PLAYERS UNION, the group that's supposed to be looking out for current and FORMER PLAYERS.  It's in their name.  They are supposed to be looking out for the players.  The whole point of a union is to look after the members.  The players were fucked by said union.  The players were NOT fucked by EA.  If EA used their likenesses without having gotten the needed information for said likenesses from the NFLPA, then it would have been on EA.  That was not the case.  The e-mail you cited proved this, as had EA done this without the approval of the NFLPA, they wouldn't have discussed it with the NFLPA, the NFLPA wouldn't have said "just scramble the face and change the number," and the NFLPA would have had to, by their own by-laws, file an injunction against EA.  Absolutely none of this came to pass, because the NFLPA signed off on the whole thing.  That's why those players sued the NFLPA, and that is why those players won.  To then say "Down with EA!" because the member of the group suing the NFLPA that the group calls outspoken says that he thinks they should sue EA is just absolutely baseless, and for you to think that such a lawsuit wouldn't be a losing battle proves how retarded you are.

---

He was dead when I got here.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I never laid claim to knowing more about the law than ANYONE, just to knowing more about the law than YOU. And, truth be told, that's not much of an accomplishment, given that the law you do know about can hardly fill a thimble.

And, no, you're not a dumbfuck because I'm too stupid to figure out that Austin Lewis meant "legally." Truth be told, I'm not sure why you're a dumbfuck - just that you are. But, if I had to hazard a guess, I'd surmise that your Mother smoked cigarettes and drank alcohol during pregnancy. But, again, that's just my educated guess.  

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Ohh, nice comeback.  I like how it contradicts itself.  "I didn't say that to anyone!  I said it to you!"  Last time I checked, I counted as someone.

I also love how you don't actually try to argue with my post, you just attack me personally.  I know you're retarded and all, so I'll fill you in: this is how we know you're full of shit.

---

He was dead when I got here.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I'm so tired of flogging that old-ass debate with you that it ain't even funny no more. I concluded back when we originally discussed the matter in the original thread that you are absolutely clueless on the issue. You can't even get the facts, much less the law, straight. I'm not going to re-visit that issue with you. That's a monumental waste of my time.

Besides, I see where you're now drifting into the realm of sophistry ("anyone" must necessarily include "me" and therefore you contradict yourself). Just because you wanna be a dumbfuck doesn't mean that I must willing join you. 

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I live in california, have sold firearms in california, and it is easy to get a gun in california, legally or otherwise.

 

Also, people are pooping these cheap swords you can buy, but I bought one for $20 when I was out with my family, didn't let them sharpen it though so it would be 'safe', and when I got home it still sliced through an orange hanging from a tree and broke small branches. It has heavy and hard and I could see one breaking an arm. Remember, all it takes is one cut of an artery to have you bleed out in 5 mintues.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Really?  I tell you what then, go out and get a Bushmaster and an H&K handgun with a 12 round mag.  Tell me how long that takes you.

Oh, and I mean a real AR-15 by bushmaster, not one that has a welded mag or some such.

What's that?  You can't get those?  That's what I thought.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

 Why does the type of gun matter? i mean, we're talking about some nut attacking a school, does the exact type of gun really matter... frankly, most ANY kind of gun would have been more efficient than a sword or chainsaw.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

He's suggesting it is easy to get a firearm in California, which is contrary to the truth.  It is harder to get a firearm in California than in any other state in the US.  For example, California considers some types of shotgun to be 'assault weapons'.  It also has some lovely laws considering ownership of semi-automatic magazine-fed rifles (like an Ar-15). 

Fun story.  There's a book issued by the ATF every year with every gun law of every state and county in the USA.  California has 62 pages of laws, 4 times more than any other state.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

The hell it is.

Before I launch into unnecessary reasoning about how easy it is to get a gun in California, especially So. Cal., let's employ some sheer base logic: If it was hard to get a gun, people in So. Cal. might not have to worry about getting shot for wearing the wrong color on the wrong street, gun violence wouldn't be one of the single greatest commons of injury and death among persons under 30, there might not be metal detetectors in schools, and the police would actually not worry about being shot by some kid on the street with a Saturday Night Special in his backpack.

Fun story, Japan has the strictest firearms laws on the planet; No citizen aside from a police officer or a member of the military under any circumstances is to possess one. But that stops gun violence? I think not.

Fun story, California has a lot of gun laws. Cool. It must be really effective since gun violence is still heavily common in Southern California and some cities in Northern California (including San Francisco and Oakland).

The fact that the city of Los Angeles holds what is practically an annual "Gun Amnesty" drive shows that gun laws are REALLY effective in California.

The fact that anyone aged 4 and above and who knows even basic street smarts knows where he or she can buy a hand-gun for between $100 to $200, especially in Downtown L.A. in the corner markets where they don't care how old you are, or from the gangs in their area (which are stretched all throughout California) shows gun laws and propaganda relating to them must be taking a strong hold among the citizens.

Seriously, not difficult to obtain a gun in California? What California are you living in and where is the dimensional rift located so we can close it (or market it so I can make some money on inter-dimensional travel).

----
Papa Midnight
http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

----
Papa Midnight

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I said it elsewhere, but I was talking about legally getting a gun.  Of course you can illegally get a fiream, but once again, I don't see this kid having the balls to do that.  If he had, we probably would be reading a story about a kid being killed and rolled into the street.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Who's cares about the difficulty invovled in legally obtaining a gun if guns are readily and easily obtained illegally? You were trying to make it sound as if next to no one in California would have the firepower needed to turn your ass into a piece of swiss cheese. And I can tell you that ain't at all true.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

"Who's cares about the difficulty invovled in legally obtaining a gun if guns are readily and easily obtained illegally?"

legally getting a gun was the whole point of this string of conversation... Austin originally was talking about getting a gun legally... Shahab said that it was not difficult to get a gun "legally or otherwise"... and Austin was countering the claim; namely the "legal" part

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I don't read what Austin said like that at all. When he invites his reader to attempt to purchase particular types of guns, does he make a distinction between purchasing those guns on the legitimate or illegitmate markets before triumphantly claiming the impossibility thereof? I don't see where he does. To me, he sounds as if he's saying it's simply and wholly impossible. If not and I'm wrong, then he should take more care to make distinctions clear.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

 OK ya, he didn't actually specify... but really this is Austin we are talking about.

As someone who comments on GP, and replies to his posts, i would think that you'd have a grasp of where he stands on these issues. Namely, his stance on gun control being that it only serves to make it harder for regular citizens to buy guns legally, as criminals will just use illegal methods and thus go around the control... So if he's talking about how "hard" it is to get guns, he is 99% of the time talking about legally... especially if we are talking about a blue state

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I already pointed out to Mr. Lewis that he should be reciting the old NRA saw that "when guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns." But unless you're schizophrenic, you can't reasonably say at the the same time that (a) California's strict gun laws make it impossible to obtain certain guns and (b) California's strict gun laws don't work to ensure that it is impossible to obtain certain guns. Those two positions are mutually exclusive. Sometimes, you just gotta pick a side and stick with it consistently and not run around, like a headless chicken, all over the place.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

So I can't say that the fact that he lives in a state where it's harder than fuck to get a legal firearm that it's unlikely that he, a 17 year old nerd, wouldn't be likely to use one in a school massacre?  But at the same time, I can't maintain, as is the case, that California is host to some of the worst gun crime in the Nation, mostly done with weapons that are illegal?

Do you really think this kid would have gone done to South Central with his 200 dollars and tried to get a gun?  What, with your street smarts, do you think would have been the outcome?  Because I'm willing to bet the outcome would be him getting robbed and murdered.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

There's this thing called a "car," Mr. Lewis. I'm told that if you fill it up with enough gas and stick enough dollar bills in your pocket, you can drive out of a state with strict gun control laws and into another nearby state with few gun control laws and purchase guns and ammunition to your heart's content, then drive back with them to the state you came from.

New York, particularly New York City, has strict gun control laws. Yet, at one time, two-thirds of all the guns used in the commission of crimes in New York City and recovered by law enforcement (a significant number of guns) were determined to have come from four or five gun dealers in Virginia (a few hours drive away by car from New York).

What do you think all them bangers in South Central are using to light each other up? Super Soakers? Please. There's an AK on every block. If an idiot really wants to get their hands on a particular gun and has enough money, ain't nothing much stopping them.

Besides, you're failing to recite the NRA's party line. Isn't their argument against stricter gun control laws that the people most likely to commit crimes with guns simply ignore the gun control laws by obtaining guns on the black market or otherwise circumventing or violating those laws? Or are you, a card-carrying, bumper-sticker sporting member of the NRA, now saying that gun control laws actually work?   

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Well, there's also this thing about this individual being 17.  You know, 1 year too young to buy a rifle or shotgun?  4 years too young to buy a handgun? Yeah.  As for his parents, the fact that he lies with only his mom would increase the likelihood of there not being a firearm in the home. 

As far as what happened in NYC goes, it's likely because they found a few unscrupulous dealers in VA.  It happens from time to time.  There's a dealer in Cincinnati, OH, who sold 39 browning hi-powers to one individual, who then resold them to local gangs and thugs.  There's a store in (I believe) Iowa that did something very similar. When you find an unscrupulous dealer, it's common to find out they supplied firearms to criminals.  That's a very rare occurence though, and when the ATF catches on, that's usually the end of their life.

The bangers in South Central get a lot of their firearms from, you guessed it, Mexico.  Most of the time, they get the usual gang banger fare; Ak's, Uzi's, Mac-10's, etc. But there's not some dealer selling Class 3 weapons to them in America.

Do the gun laws in CA work?  Hell no.  They make it harder for law abiding people to get firearms.  Luckily, there wasn't a firearm in this kid's house, or he'd have probably used it.  But consider if the teacher had a firearm, how much quicker this would have been ended (and at how much less risk to the teacher). 

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Actually, my uniformed friend, the trade in assualt rifles goes in the other direction from border states like Arizona and Texas down into Mexico where the cartels are willing to pay up four times the retail price. Only an idiot would take guns legally imported into Mexico from the U.S. and then illegally import back into the U.S. Where from do get these facts? Some NRA propaganda pamphlet?  

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Yeah, assault rifles don't go down to Mexico from the US.  You know why?  Because with record numbers of military and police desertions, they don't need to buy from the states.  Most of the firearms that were tracked were handguns and shotguns, many fairly old.  By the way, the number that Hillary Clinton and Eric Holder were spouting, 90% of weapons used by the cartels being from America?  Bullshit.  The real number is closer to 20%.  Of the weapons which they turned the trace data over to us, 90% were from the US.  However, when you consider that they turned very few over to us, you get a very different picture.  Why would they turn rifles with Russian and Chinese markings over to us for tracing when they can already tell where they're from?

And why would they pay this mythological 4 times retail price for SEMI AUTOMATIC RIFLES when they can get cheap automatic ones from deserters?

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Maybe because the cartels make so much money from drug trafficking they can't even begin to properly count it all and don't give a rat's ass about the price of anything? For the same reason they're willing to pay three times the retail price for an H2 Hummer in Chiapas. Because money ain't no object to them.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Cartels are a business first and foremost.  A disgusting business, but a business all the same.  So, if they have to choose between a rifle that's A) farther away B) Semi-automatic and C)more expensive or a rifle that's A) in the hands of some ex-soldier or cop down the street B) Select-fire, allowing for a higher volume of fire against police and C)cheaper, you tell me which one they're going to take.  There is no reason for them to buy a rifle from the US.  They have all they could want down there already.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

There's no reason for them to riddle with bullets anyone who looks at them sideways. That's not a rational decision by a businessperson. It's bad for business because it draws more heat and ultimately creates more problems than any it could ever have been intended to solve. But they do it, anyway. What do you think? A cartel jeffe has an MBA from Wharton School of Business?  

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

They do it because they figure that violence is the best way of protecting whatever asset those individuals are watching.  Sometimes, they do it because, after 20 years of being left alone by the lazy government of Mexico, they realize that it's still not too likely that they'll be called on their bullshit.

The heads of those cartels walk the fine line between business person and murderer.  They need people to realize that they're ruthless enough, but not too ruthless (or else they'll avoid doing business with them).  If they're not percieved as ruthless enough, people will begin to steal from the cartel in small ways.  A few dollars go missing here, a few pounds of marijuana or cocaine there, and all of the sudden the cartel is losing 25% of their yearly cash intake and the head of the cartel is on the chopping block in favor of someone who will crack down.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

You're missing the point, Mr. Lewis, which is that you can't take formal business decision-making processes and apply them to a non-traditonal business like organized drug smuggling. As I tried to explain to you, the cost-to-profit ratio in that particualar business is so extraordinarily high that your cost-benefit reasoning simply doesn't apply. If you've got more "quick money" than you know what to do with, then the price of anything isn't really a concern. You'll simply pay the price, regardless of how irrational doing so may seem to a more rational person. 

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

When the difference is about 5000 dollars a rifle, you'll go for the cheaper, more accessable, option.  That's why most of the rifles they use have the markings of rifles sold by the American government to the Mexican government.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Not when $5000 is chump change to you and which you didn't exactly hump your ass to get. Easy come, easy go.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

So, you think that these drug dealers would rather spend $5000 extra PER PERSON to arm their huge armies of thugs?  REALLY? 

Every dollar they spend is a dollar they don't get to spend on themselves.  Think about that.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

When you have more money than you know what to do with and which, if you lived three back-to-back lifetimes, you couldn't even begin to completely spend on yourself, you tend not to see things in the light which you suggest they should be seen. Again, your rational analysis doesn't apply to a circumstance which is nowhere near rational. 

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

You do realize that running this drug empire requires quite a large expenditure of cash, do you not?  You do also realize that these people are very motivated by having more money, more property etc, right?  As such, they do everything they can to keep as much money in their pocket as they can.  Mexican Cartels are nothing like Denzel's character from American Gangster.  They're not going to give out 100,000 when 50,000 will do.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I don't know about all that "blah, blah, blah," but I do realize that you're a nit-wit. Gotta go, now. Wendy Williams is on T.V. Can't miss that.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Virginia is easily by far the best place by which to obtain virtually any weapon you want short of a tank or chopper without any questions asked.

----
Papa Midnight
http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

----
Papa Midnight

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

I see what your trying to say, but naming particular types of guns does not really make the argument... naming particular guns only tells me its hard to get a handgun with a 12 round mag; it doesn't tell me that its hard to get a handgun with a smaller magazine size. Same goes for the AR-15; pointing that gun out in particular doesn't tell me anything about other types of guns.

I mean, he made the general statement that "its easy to get a gun"... not "any" gun, but "a" gun... Saying you can't "get this particular gun" does not refute that claim as he could be talking about another kind of gun (likely one of less caliber)... gotta make a statement that makes it clear that it's "hard to get any gun", to refute the claim that it's hard to get "a" gun

With the mention of california's laws on semi-automatic weapons, i can see where your going with those types of weapons... but that still doesn't tell me that a person would find it very hard to get their hands on something like a handgun with a 9 round magazine... sure it's not as effecient for shooting up a public place as 12 round mag, but it would probably be an improvement to using a sword/chainsaw.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

You do realize that your points 1 and 3 contradict each other, right?  If guns are so hard to come by in California, then how could you reasonably expect this kid to have a gun?

---

Freedom of speech means the freedom to say ANYTHING, so long as it is the truth. This does not exclude anything that might hurt someone's feelings.

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Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Because Body Armor is harder to come by.  Reasonably, if the kid had body armor (or rather, his parents had it), they probably had a gun.  Who the fuck buys body armor without a weapon?

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

But the edit contradicts this.  Body Armor and Tactical Vests are not the same thing.  A tactical vest does offer some light protection against handguns, but real body armor is designed to protect somewhat effectively from close range rifle blasts.  In either case, they aren't that hard to get.  Military surplus stores sell 80's and 90's-era vests rather cheap.  In Minnesota, I went to a place where you could get one for fifty bucks, still in the original packaging.

I've never heard of any gun place that lets you get a gun for fifty bucks.

---

Freedom of speech means the freedom to say ANYTHING, so long as it is the truth. This does not exclude anything that might hurt someone's feelings.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Pawn shop.

Hunting the shadows of the troubled dreams.

Hunting the shadows of the troubled dreams.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.

 

Trevor Gray
ganjookie@yahoo.com

Trevor Gray
ganjookie@yahoo.com

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

The pipe bombs I can see as being easy to sneak it, stick 'em in a backpack and there you go.

The vest you could wear under a jacket. (And its not terribly hard to aquire.  Surplus stores and such.  Not illegal to have one, but you get extra penalties in most states for commiting a crime while wearing one and carrying a lethal weapon.)

The sword you could even wrap in a blanket or something and carry it under the arm.

But how the heck did nobody notice a kid carrying a chainsaw onto school property, especially amongst all this other bulky gear?

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

The chainsaw was in a violin case, apparently.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

... Sweet Jesus, you better be kidding.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Not kidding... I read that too. So, it's either a small chainsaw or someone doesn't know the difference between a violin and a cello.

"I'd far rather be happy than right any day."

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Or it's an electric hedge trimmer. 

Seriously though, I've never seen a chainsaw that could fit into a violin case, so I'm going to call bullshit on this reporting.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

 Just google "small chainsaw" or something like that...

http://gearpatrol.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/black-and-decker-c...

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

No, they make chainsaws that small.  They make mini-chainsaws with only a one-foot-long chain-blade thingy, whatever that's called.

---

Freedom of speech means the freedom to say ANYTHING, so long as it is the truth. This does not exclude anything that might hurt someone's feelings.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Well, It's glad to hear no one was hurt or worse and the teachers/staff acted in manner by subduing the creep.

 

Im not surprised if JT got wind of this & is currently getting ready to call the states law enforcement as we speak.

Magic Taco

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Sounds like a bad case of the Mondays to me.

---You are likely to be eaten by a Grue.

---You are likely to be eaten by a Grue.

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

Well since he's under 18 he was apparently born yesterday so of course he can't be held accountable for the actions he willingly made. Its everyone and everything else's fault but his. He made a willing decision to acquire weapons and take action. IDC how much people say games and TV make you do something. They may give you ideas of what to do and how to do it  but at the end of the day its the person who makes the choice not the TV; not the game. Just like a gun: the trigger doesn't magically pull by itself.  Also I'd like to know how he acquired a vest. Not exactly something you pick up at Wal-Mart. 

 

Not wanting the government involved in your personal lives also includes not demanding they do your job as a parent.

"With free speech either all of it is ok or none of it is." Kyle Broflovski

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

It actually isn't that hard to find a bulletproof vest. I doubt the one he was wearing was military or police grade, but private investigators and such have bulletproof vests, they have to get them from somewhere.

There are specialty stores that sell this kind of thing, along with motion detectors, tiny cameras and such things. 

Re: Was High School Attack Inspired by Video Games?

No, it wasn't. Now that wasn't so hard to comprehend.

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Sleakersimply oust people that do harass others.09/20/2014 - 11:34am
Sleaker@Conster - I can say the same thing if you think there's been more than a handful. Until there's an actual study on rates no one can claim to know how widespread the incidence of harassment is. Thus the best we can do is 'there might be an issue' and...09/20/2014 - 11:33am
ConsterSleaker: if you think there's only been "a handful of" incidents, you have your head stuck *somewhere* - I'm assuming it's sand.09/20/2014 - 5:38am
prh99Most of it's agitprop clickbait anyway.09/20/2014 - 5:27am
prh99A good reason to stop reading reguardless of view pointhttp://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/apr/12/news-is-bad-rolf-dobelli.09/20/2014 - 5:22am
Andrew EisenWell this is unique! A musical critique of the Factual Feminist's "Are Video Games Sexist?" video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-K4s7cV4Us409/20/2014 - 2:41am
Andrew EisenSome locked threads. Some let them be. So, no, I'm not seeing a problem here. No corruption. No collusion. No ethical problem with privately discussing ethics.09/20/2014 - 12:48am
Andrew EisenAnd still, in the end, Tito made up his own mind on how to handle his site. All 150 or so members went off to handle their own sites in their own ways. Some talked about it. Some didn't. Some changed disclosure policies. Some didn't.09/20/2014 - 12:40am
Andrew EisenThere were two comments other than Kochera and Tito's. One pointed out the Escapist Code of Conduct, another comment was in support of Tito.09/20/2014 - 12:40am
Andrew EisenKochera privately expressed his disagreement on how Tito decided to do something. No, I don't consider that crossing a line nor do I consider the exchange an example of the group pressuring him.09/20/2014 - 12:36am
Kronotechnical reasons. Anyways, I need to get to sleep as well.09/20/2014 - 12:29am
KronoAnd he wasn't the only one pushing Tito to censor the thread. If Tito had bowed to peer pressure, we likely wouldn't have gotten this http://goo.gl/vKiYtR which grew out of that thread. Said thread also lasted until a new one needed to be made for09/20/2014 - 12:28am
Krono@Andrew So it's an example of Kuchera crossing the line from reporter to advocate. And an example of the group pressuring for censorship.09/20/2014 - 12:21am
E. Zachary KnightAnyway, I am off to bed. I will probably wake up to all of this being knocked off the shout box.09/20/2014 - 12:20am
E. Zachary KnightKrono, that is the type of reading too much into things that bugs me. Ben did no such thing. Greg had the last word in that part of the exchange. The rest was about how to approach the story and Quinn.09/20/2014 - 12:19am
Andrew EisenSo?09/20/2014 - 12:13am
KronoExcept that the forum thread wasn't harassment, and Kuchera continued to push for the thread's removal after Tito made it clear he didn't consider it harassment.09/20/2014 - 12:12am
Andrew EisenPersonally, I see nothing wrong with someone offering their opinion or the other person making up their own mind on how to run their site.09/20/2014 - 12:06am
E. Zachary KnightKrono, I read nothing of the sort in that email chain. I read Ben giving advice on what to do when a forum thread is used to harass someone and spread falshoods about them and others.09/20/2014 - 12:05am
KronoThat's exactly what Ben Kuchera was doing to Greg Tito.09/19/2014 - 11:58pm
 

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