Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content Ratings

September 3, 2009 -

As GamePolitics noted last week, the Federal Communications Commission has floated the idea of a universal content rating system which would span various forms of media, including video games.

While lobbying group ESA quickly raised objections to the concept, the video game industry did quite well in an FCC report on parental controls issued to Congress on Monday. GameCulture has more:

Members of Congress who will receive the FCC's report will find almost nothing negative about the game industry's handling of parental control technology and ratings. Common Sense Media's concern about unrated online content and user-created content is noted but countered by the ESA, which points out that "no rating system or control device can anticipate the extemporaneous world of the Internet..."

While the FCC says it intends to launch a Notice of Inquiry specifically for games, this first round is a clear victory for the industry.  At this rate, even if regulators decide to pursue a "universal rating system," it could end up looking a lot like the system developed by the ESRB.


Comments

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

The real question is, does the FCC or even congress have the authority to implement such a system? Past attempts to force ratings on anything but public air waves have either been dropped or found unconstitutional.

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

Exactly.

While imposing a rating system on all media would doubtless be a regulatory wet dream come true for the FCC, they don't actually have the authority to impose such a rating system outside of broadcast media and cable TV no matter how brazenly they pretend that since the second C in FCC stands for "communications" they must surely have authority over all possible means of communication.

 

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

A general ratings system could be constitutional, but any attempts of legal enforcement wouldn't be, as that would be violating the First Amendment.  As for the FCC running it, I don't think that's legal, either, as they only have the ability to regulate broadcasting, of which video games are not a part of.  As for the FCC warning on your Xbox, that's there to warn of the possibility (no matter how slight) that the electronics could interfere with incoming or outgoing broadcasts, and that incoming or outgoing broadcasts could interfere with it as well.  To this point in time, that is the legal limit of the FCC's control on our beloved industry.

As I said above, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

---

He was dead when I got here.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

I think there is a FCC regulation about electronic interference, but that applys to basicly anything that gets plugged in.

Hunting the shadows of the troubled dreams.

Hunting the shadows of the troubled dreams.

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

You're right, but it's strictly limited to the scope of the interference itself.

---

He was dead when I got here.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

FCC, this brings up the old saw:  "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

---

He was dead when I got here.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Video Game Biz Does Well in FCC Report on Content ...

At this rate, even if regulators decide to pursue a "universal rating system," it could end up looking a lot like the system developed by the ESRB.

Just because the ESBR ratings works for video games dosen;t mean it'll more for movies and tv.

http://www.magicinkgaming.com/

 
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Andrew EisenKrono - Many of the people pushing gender issues aren't nice people? I'm sure not everyone's a sweatheart but so far, everyone I've seen with such a critique had absolutely nothing to back them up.09/19/2014 - 10:46am
InfophileI think there's a qualitative difference between a site and a hashtag though. GP can ban anyone from commenting, so they can have the image they want. But anyone can use any hashtag and try to poison it. Granted, that hasn't happened to the other one yet09/19/2014 - 10:13am
E. Zachary KnightKrono, your comparison to GP does not work. We do not need to get rid of GP, because no one associates GP with trolls and abuse. The same can't be said for gamergate.09/19/2014 - 10:09am
Krono@Michael You don't remember the "other hashtag" because no one actually uses it. We're talking 836,983 uses of #gamergate over it's lifetime, and 8,119 for the "alternative". 47,129 uses on the 18th vs 41. With #notyourshield at 140,133 uses & 5,209 uses09/19/2014 - 9:48am
Kronoresearch it. Changing tags to get away from trolls would be like wiping GamePolitics and restarting under a new name to get away from people calling Jack Thompson a filthy names in the comments section.09/19/2014 - 9:35am
Sleaker@quiknkold - seems like all that page is is a bunch of random developer opinions and rumors that we're supposedto do what with?09/19/2014 - 9:31am
Kronoas an opportunity to push back against them. It's one of the things muddling the issue. @conster A new hashtag would do nothing to improve anything. Trolls will simply follow to the new hashtag, and it will confuse the issue for anyone attempting to09/19/2014 - 9:25am
Krono@Andrew aaah. Yes, I'm sure there's some of that. Part of the problem is many of the people pushing gender issues are not very nice people. Basically the latest incarnation of moralists we've seen in the past couple decades. Naturually some will take this09/19/2014 - 9:23am
quiknkoldhttp://www.nichegamer.net/2014/09/real-gamedevs-sound-off-regarding-the-gamergate-controversy/09/19/2014 - 8:35am
MaskedPixelanteMeanwhile, in news that actually DOES matter, Scotland voted "NO" to Scottish independance.09/19/2014 - 8:20am
ConsterSeriously? "We shouldn't make a new hashtag - it's better to associate ourselves with psychos than to decrease our visibility"?09/19/2014 - 7:54am
Michael ChandraI forget what it is exactly, but there already is another hashtag that some use, exactly to separate themselves from the abusive behaviour. So don't bother lying to me.09/19/2014 - 7:06am
quiknkold2 to 3 or more09/19/2014 - 6:53am
quiknkoldMichael Chandra : I'll say this. The only reason they havent used another hashtag is because it would look like a form of dividing the arguement. Using another Hashtag has come up, and they feel like if they made a new hashtag, it'll split the debate from09/19/2014 - 6:53am
Michael ChandraYou want a debate? Build a wall between you and the poisoned well. Make clear you despise it, despise the behaviour. Then get into the other issues you are troubled with, and don't say a single word again about the poisoned well.09/19/2014 - 3:46am
Michael ChandraAnd someone claiming #notyourshield was to be taken serious, when chatlogs show they wanted it going to hide even more harassment behind? Yeah, not buying a word you're saying. You poisoned your own well.09/19/2014 - 3:45am
Michael Chandraallegedly fired over giving a game a mediocre review and the company threatened to pull ads? Sorry but I ain't buying this.09/19/2014 - 3:45am
Michael ChandraBut people arguing this is horrible and just about ethics, even though there's very little support that journalistic integrity was actually violated here, while they never spoke up when a journalist was09/19/2014 - 3:43am
Michael ChandraIf people start with condemning the way GamersGate was used as a misdirection, then use a better hashtag, that would work in convincing me they mean it.09/19/2014 - 3:43am
Andrew EisenOoo, this one came down to the wire! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/749082525/nefarious09/19/2014 - 1:03am
 

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