Remorseless Gaming

VentureBeat has word on a new website that takes some of the guilt out of playing videogames. donates 70 percent of its ad-driven revenue to charity and keeps a running tally of the total donated to-date (as of this posting it was $1787.73) at the top if its webpage. Charities that benefit include Feeding America, The Wilderness Society, Unicef and the United Way.

Available games include versions of Solitaire,  Sudoku, Gems,  Blackjack, Smashteroids and Bubble Burst.

The site was founded by CEO Adam Archer, a self-proclaimed “backpacker turned software engineer.” On the website’s blog, Archer explained how he hopes the donations will build over time:

On GamesThatGive, your micro-donation is the equivalent of a raindrop. The more frequently and the longer you play, and the better you score, the more micro-donations you generate. When you play games on GamesThatGive, when you invite your friends to play as well, when they invite their friends, and on and on, the micro-donations add up.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on RedditEmail this to someone


  1. 0
    SeanB says:

    Why the hell do they need to add "support" outside the US? They’re specifically blocking us, not finding a way to support us.

    There is a very easy way to "support" international users. Make a list of your advertising clients, find out which ones are willing to pay for international advertising, then just show international browsers THOSE advertisments.


  2. 0
    GoodRobotUs says:

    Downside is that it is currently only available inside the US.

    Suppose that makes sense in a way, but they are, according to the site, trying to provide support for outside the US.

  3. 0
    Mechadon says:

    I don’t know exaclty why, but this feels a bit condisending to gamers. It’s like they’ve hooked up their charity up to a hamster wheel.

    The best example of getting gamers involved with charity is Penny Arcade’s Child’s Play. Maybe they should try following PA’s example instead of suggesting that gamers are monotinous drones.

  4. 0
    ZippyDSMlee says:

    More like Charities side step normal buisness taxation to make a profit….


    Befor the 30s Charities took care of soem of the populace befor the goverment cared about what the popualce did, so I don;t see them in such a harsh light….however….. if they are not doing soemthing worth while in the local comunity theya re in they are not a Charitiy IMO….they are jsut another business….


    Until lobbying is a hanging offense I choose anarchy! Stop supporting big media and furthering the criminalization of consumers!!

  5. 0
    Bennett Beeny says:

    Bah, humbug!  Charities just aid the government in sidestepping its responsibilities to we the people.  Also, private charities are like the privately-funded fire departments of the 19th Century – inefficient and hugely prone to corruption.

    I don’t feel guilty playing games, but I would definitely feel guilty playing a game that gave my money to charity.

Leave a Reply