Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

June 11, 2010 -

Earlier this week we ran a story in which the Japanese Computer Entertainment Suppliers Association (CESA), citing data from a study conducted by Tokyo University's Baba Lab, said that piracy of games for portable devices cost the gaming industry over $41 billion between 2004 and 2009.

GP commenters noted a flaw, perhaps, in the survey methodology, while similarly, a TechDirt reader came up with a list of four reasons why, in his opinion, the study should carry no weight:

1. Every infringing download is counted as a lost sale

2. CESA took the numbers for Japanese handheld game piracy and multiplied it by four to get the worldwide numbers, because CESA "believes" Japan represents 1/4 of the market

3. Deviations in piracy levels in different world regions were not taken into account

4. Pricing for games per unauthorized copies were ALL based on the initial release price, not taking into account pricing fluctuations of games over time

A report issued earlier this year by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) questioned the credibility of U.S. piracy and counterfeiting data, calling widely used figures unsubstantiated.


Comments

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Oddly I get the feeling this might be justification for them to NEVER release some of these games outside of Japan.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Asia has more issues with priacy real and otherwise than the US ever will.


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Indeed. Considering that works on the asumption DQ (which has a noticable lack of market outside of its own country, and couldn't even be a lost sale because it is not out yet outside of Japan anyways.) would get 3/4 of its sales from outside of the country... yeah Baka Lab is more like it.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

The industry the corporate types is forgetting deal with the consumer in front of you and focus on them doing more for them. If you fail to do this you will lose money because you lose profits, the one legged bandit for the most part is something that unless you can stick illicit selling/profit charges with is something that you just have to ignore and get over.

 

Just think of a DRM system that instead of treating you as a thief out of the box, you install it bu the key in and you can play all of it without any hassle, unless you give more than 10 friends then it may black list you for having more than 10 ips pop up in a months time. Do flood control not this activation crap both lead to nullifying overuse or bad copies hell even let them give parts of it to 5 friends if the register the game and key on their online account. then the friends can be giving links to demos or co op stuff max it out to 5ips or so(on the same key) and set the flood to watch for more than 30 simultaneous uses other wise it would be closer to 15.

 

Aanything more than this is just to little to late hassle the consumer dose not want to deal with....and yes I buy as well alot of used and discoutned stuff,universes at war 8$ new beat that HA!!!.

 


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

 

[...] then it may black list you for having more than 10 ips pop up in a months time.

This system would be bound to inevitably fail for reasons that are utterly obvious and include, but are not limited to: Laptops, Dynamic IPs (especially for people with DSL), and numerous other reasons.

Frankly, I say keep the Battle.net system. Challenge to a key check algorithm that checks to make sure the key is at least the legitimate format style for the game to be installed. Then, of course, have the secondary key check against their database every time they log in to play the multiplayer aspects of the game to confirm the key is truthfully legitimate.

Hey, this method has been successful and worked for Blizzard Entertainment for the past... 15 years? I think they might have something going here. Sure someone can generate a key at any time to play the single player features, but they can't play online. If they want to play online, they'll have to purcahse a license - aka, buy the game. EA does this as well, I believe. It's actually worked for them as well.

Ubisoft tried it for a bit, and it worked too, but their games have been problematic in that they've been of rather a poor state of quality - at least with regards to their PC releases. Considering practically every one of their games runs on the Unreal Engine - and Unreal Engine 2 at that, there is absolutely NO EXCUSE for the terrible performance they achieve on the PC, even above the stated recommended requirements. I'll just run down a quick shortlist here: Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Vegas and Vegas 2 (see: IGN's review for proof that I'm not blowing smoke here), Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction and Double Agent.

I'll quote GameStop's review of Conviction, just for added effect:

It's surprising that the game doesn't perform better. On PCs that exceed the recommended system requirements, Conviction is prone to frame rate dips and the occasional stutter. Even the overly compressed cinematics suffer from similar frame rate jitters when the camera pans across the environment.

 

[...]

 

It's a shame that the PC version of Splinter Cell: Conviction doesn't deliver on its potential. Stellar storytelling and slick executions lead to some enjoyment, but other facets of the game come across as careless. Co-op play without player communication; uneven performance; copy protection that leads to noticeable in-game frustrations--these and other elements distract from what should have been a great game. That it retails for $10 more than a typical PC release makes these flaws seem even more egregious. The issues won't make you as angry as Sam Fisher, but they will make you wish that this version of Conviction had been given the loving care it deserved.

 

H.A.W.X. seems to be the notable exception here, granted the game sold terribly.

It honestly seems to me that Ubisoft spends more time working on inevitably cracked DRM than actually producing a decent title. This builds end user anger among PC gamers (Anyone remember the Amazon 1-star attacks?) who don't usually take things lying down under any circumstances. Scorn is scorn. Just look at Activision. Ubisoft could take a hint or two in the customer support and server stability department from Blizzard Entertainment as well...

So, yes, I say go the Blizzard Entertainment route. Notice how it makes mostly everyone happy?

----
Papa Midnight
http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

 

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Papa Midnight

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

You do know that anything offered as some way to prevent piracy would be wholly shunned by a lot of people, right?  Hell, CD keys, in and of themselves were shunned, and they're the least obtrusive form of DRM that I've ever experienced, in my opinion.

---

With the first link, the chain is forged.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

True true, but therer is annoying and then there hassle is then key>activation, untill the upgrade the official duplication process with automatic key the player/reader can read. Keys are about the only way to make that game unique.

 

Of couse you could make it so the game comes with no key but you can not use the game until you go to the site register it and get a key file or name and pass to put in. Thats as bad as authentication though.

 

So the best process I can think of is key to passive key flood checking system to registered account to get more specials and extras.

 

Once you put the key in you have access to the game both SP and MP but special options and extras such are locked until you sign it up to an account.

I mean it would work just as good as authentication system and hassle less buyers while those in the know can bypass it but be mostly locked out of online stuff due to uqnie key issues .


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

As a person who has never pirated anything at all, all I want is for the industry to stop whining about piracy and get back to making their crappy games better. Honestly, if they focused their energies on the pursuit of excellence rather than pursuing an enemy who, by its very nature, cannot be stopped, we'd get a better oproduct and the industry would make more money. This whole anti-piracy jihad is quixotic to say the least.

Piracy can never be stopped. You might jail a few pirates, but anyone who thinks it can be stopped probably thinks the war on prostitution and illegal drugs can be won. The only way to win such wars is to make the illegal thing legal.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Why should your personal opinion on the quality of things reflect on the state of the economics of the industry and the law of countries?

I for one don't think the industry's games are crappy.

What's your basis of comparison?

Furthermore, do you think if a car is crappy, you have a right to have that car for free, and the car owners have no right to protect it?


Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Furthermore, do you think if a car is crappy, you have a right to have that car for free,
and the car owners have no right to protect it?

Take "Sid Meyers Railroads" for example, which I purchased off Steam a few months back. That game
is so broken, that it is for all intents and purposes unplayable and it will not be patched...

Where are my rights when I purchase a game?
E.g:
Had I purchased a car or a toaster, I would have had laws protecting me as a consumer, forcing the
seller to take their product back. As is, I'm stuck with a product that is broken. Steam points me to
the developer, the developer to the publisher, the publisher don't give a crap since they already have
my money, I'm only a problem.

No, ofcourse I don't have a right to copy a product just because it's crappy...
But it has made me pirate programs to test them before purchase. (Yes, some games have DEMOs,
but they are very often not representative of the game, in the very same way that a Pepsi-ad
isn't very representative of the actual product.

I'm just asking, in this witch-hunt on piracy, who fights for the rights of the consumer?



 

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Take "Sid Meyers Railroads" for example, which I purchased off Steam a few months back. That game is so broken, that it is for all intents and purposes unplayable and it will not be patched...

If that's true and they won't give you a refund or credit, try filing a complaint with the FTC or BBB.

But it has made me pirate programs to test them before purchase.

You could always rent or do some online research first.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

I've never stolen a car or a computer game, nor have I ever had a desire to do so. If a car is a load of crap, you can take it back to the dealer and either return it or have him fix it. You can't return a computer game because the industry has closed off that avenue. We have an industry here that makes rules that prevent the customer from having any recourse for developer or publisher incompetence and which whines and punishes paying customers anytime anything doesn't go 100% the industry's way.

And if you don't think the industry publishes mostly garbage you must not be seeking out critical reviews. Just look at Zero Punctuation - there's a guy who actually tells the harsh truth about games - i.e. that they are mostly derivative and uninspired crap - ZP is one of a very few voices of reason in a sea of sycophants bought off by, you guessed it, those whiny goddamned publishers.

I have paid good money for games, the vast majority of which turned out to be overhyped garbage. I see an industry obsessing over this piracy nonsense and spending millions on advertising to cover up the fact that they're selling (for the most part) snake oil. Not only that, but their half-assed anti-piracy idiocy hurts folks like me a lot more than it hurts pirates.

The video game industry is so heavily biased towards the publishers that it's virtually impossible for them to lose money and we just let them walk all over us and then they expect us to say 'thank you'. How does that situation encourage the industry to excel? Of course, it doesn't. So we can all look forward to even more garbage from them in the future, and I expect folks like you will be there happily accepting it and telling me that I should enjoy it too.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Actually, we do have preventative recourse, in the forms of demos and rentals.

Yes, buying a crappy game sucks, but that doesn't make piracy any less illegal, nor does it change the fact that it's ultimately your fault in the first place.

---

With the first link, the chain is forged.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Tell that to the publisher who said "demos hurt the industry" a few articles back.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

"Every infringing download is counted as a lost sale."

That's always struck me as a silly, hairsplitting argument; the point gets lost in the bickering over semantics.  Perhaps everyone would be happier if "the industry lost x dollars due to piracy" was changed to "the industry is owed x dollars due to piracy."

Sure you can (and many of you do) argue that 10 pirated copies doesn't equal 10 lost sales due to purchase intent and the fact that the seller doesn't suffer a loss in inventory (infinity minus one is still infinity after all) but would any of you argue that the industry is not owed the purchase price of 10 pirated copies?

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

(sorry for the late reply, I had to wait AGES for my registration to be approved, and then there were holidays...)

You say its hairsplitting, but I think theres a big difference between the two.  If Penniless Joe downloads a game illegally, sure the company would be justified in thinking they're owed something for it.  But with not a penny to his name, there is no way in hell it can be called a lost sale.  They were never getting anything from him.  Now thats an extreme case obviously, but the principal is this: if it was impossible to pirate games, and people could only play by actually paying for them, those "lost sales" would not materialise as the company is implying they would.  Not even close.

 

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

I would.

my vanity is justified

my vanity is justified

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Do you think they're owed anything?  Any suggestions how the industry could more accurately quantify video game piracy?

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Or some of the "infringing downloads" could be by legitimate customers who have legitimately purchased the game and are downloading the copy for some other reason such as loading it onto a memory stick to play it without the physical game. It happens frequently enough on the PC that paying customers buy copies and then download "illegal" copies for convenience; I don't see why it should be any different on handheld systems.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Andrew, you make a compelling argument and pose a curious question, but, likewise, I must query: Is every $50 used game sale from GameStop $50 that the publisher is owed? Not trying to change the subject, I'm just contributing an alternate point. Perhaps it is not the same, just something to fathom.

----
Papa Midnight
http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

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Papa Midnight

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

"Is every $50 used game sale from GameStop $50 that the publisher is owed?"

Nope.  The publisher was paid when GameStop bought it from them in the first place.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Well, the reason I asked is because I've heard some publishers say just this: that used game sales are just as bad as piracy as they are subsequent transfers of the title rendering pure profit to the seller without any return to the original creator. Hence the rise in popularity of "Access Codes", "Zero Day DLC", and the like.

----
Papa Midnight
http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

----
Papa Midnight

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

It's understandable that publishers want you to buy their games new; they don't get any money if you buy them used (which is legal, fair, and the way it works in every industry).  What publishers need to do is make buying new a more attractive prospect for consumers and EA's Online Pass (and other similar systems) are attempts to do just that.  How successful those attempts will be remains to be seen but I for one appreciate the attempts over the absurd whining.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Well AE we can't even get to semantics till you stop calling infringement theft. *rolls eyes*

 =======================

All in all whatever number they come out with reduce it 10-30% then spread it out on a world wide basis...IE its pennies if that and frankly its jsut the csot of doing bunsiess.....


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

It's a but-for thing. Besides, the people who infringed their copyrights weren't stealing anything. They were copying something they weren't allowed to copy under present law. (Though there are circumstances when it is allowed under present law -- that's fair use, though those rights can be legally restricted with DRM.)

The distinction is a lot more important than many realize. One copyright lawyer after another (and even the U.S. Supreme Court) has made this clear: "intellectual property" is not physical property, and the law needs to treat them differently. Plus I'm pretty sure copyright is still a matter of civil, not criminal, law.

 

Lord, grant me the strength to finish what I

The Devourer of Time awaits... Lord, grant me the strength to finish what I

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

"Plus I'm pretty sure copyright is still a matter of civil, not criminal, law."

Incorrect.  There is a federal law that provides for criminal procecution of those who engage in copyright infringement.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

citation?

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

U.S.C. Title 17 (Copyrights), Chapter 5 (Copyright Infringement and Remedies), Section 506 (Criminal offences)

U.S.C. Title 18 (Crimes and Criminal Procedures), Chapter 133 (Stolen Property), Section 2319 (Criminal infringement of a copyright)

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Most piracy dear is non commercial, no profit made no hgih charges to hand out dear. *lick*


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Wrong.  Read the law.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

I did and see how it functions on a day to day basis, so when you pull your head out of your ass and able to understand semantics, funtionally you have only 2 outcomes in infringement cases criminal and civil. One of which is difficult to prove much less win and is more for the sake of appearance of integrity like keeping blacks out of palces in the 40s/50s and banning guns that "look dangerous"......................


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

So?  It's still a Federal crime, with real jail time a possibility.

---

With the first link, the chain is forged.

--- With the first link, the chain is forged.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

I might be wrong but I believe it only becomes a federal crime when it is done on a commercial basis (i.e. the difference selling intellectual property rather than just making a personal copy and/or giving a copy to a friend) as opposed to a non-commercial basis. Mind you, if said friend makes further copies and sells them for commercial profit, it is by definition distribution of copyrighted materials, a violation of intellectual property law, and makes you liable as an accessory or direct contributer. This is, of course, if my memory serves me correctly with regards to the law.

----
Papa Midnight
http://www.thesupersoldiers.com

----
Papa Midnight

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

"I might be wrong but I believe it only becomes a federal crime when it is done on a commercial basis..."

Yep, you're wrong.  Although, prior to '97 the law did require the infringement be committed for the purpose of commercial advantage or private financial gain.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Um the difference between criminal and civil dear....... its only a federal crime if they can trump up the charges enough....*rolls eyes*


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

I think it is because of the way they state the premise, how much the industry "lost". To be honest, some people download a game and then never play it. Would you say they "owed" the industry? 

Truth of the matter, it comes down to how much money the industry made versus how much it could have made in a world where piracy didn't exist. As such a world doesn't exist, all you can do is guess. Industry mouthpieces like to make the number as big as possible. That is why they like to take any measurable number they can get, and start multiplying it by non-measurable metrics.

Think of the term significant digits. Yoiu have a number that you measured out to five decimal places. You know how accurate it is. Now you must add it to a number that was measured to two decimal places. You can't claim the final number is still accurate to five decimal places. Your calculation is only as accurate as the least accurate calculation you d to it. As soon as they start just multiplying it by pure POoTA numbers, the results are nothing but hot air.

Back to the original question, how much more money would the industry have made? Only people who would have paid for the game if they hadn't been able to get it from free... minus anyone who bought the game who wouldn't have bought the game if their pirate friend hadn't told them it was good.

That is why I see every pirated copy being multiplied by an initial MSRP, multiplied by a completely made up factor in order to make the number big enough as having a estimated accuracy of +/- %100.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

"To be honest, some people download a game and then never play it. Would you say they "owed" the industry?"

I would, yes.  Just as I would say they owed the grocery store the cost of the bag of chips they stole* regardless of whether they ended up eating them or not.

As to the rest, I agree that most of these reports (regardless of your views on "one copy = one sale") are chalkful of bad math.  That said, I think it would be accurate to calculate the amount of money the industry is owed by adding up the purchase prices of each individual pirated copy (assuming you could track such a thing).

For example: Game A is $60.  It was pirated 5 times at launch and another 5 after a $10 price drop.  The industry is owed $550.

 

Andrew Eisen

*Yes, there's a difference in the harm done between shoplifting and illegally downloading a video game.  Let's leave that arguement for another time.

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

 ...Just as I would say they owed the grocery store the cost of the
bag of chips they stole* regardless of whether they ended up eating
them or not...

Flawed analogy, a better one would be... "If a person picked up a
paper in a supermarket, but put it back, without reading it before
exiting the store. Would this person still owe the store money for
holding the paper?"

-----

...That said, I think it would be accurate to calculate the amount
of money the industry is owed by adding up the purchase prices of
each individual pirated copy...

By that argument, how would you count lost sales for:

- Someone downloads a game two times? Should they have to pay for
the product EACH time?

- Someone downloads a game to test it and then purchases it?
Should they have to pay two times for the same product?

- A 10 year old kid, with no money, DLed 500 games?
How do you turn this into lost revenue?

- Someone who buys the game, but then download a cracked version
to be able to play the game without DRM's? (E.g Ubisoft's draconian
DRM, which will throw you out of a single player game, without saving
the instant your connection makes a hickup.) 

----- 

It is, imo, so trivial to see that the number of downloads has nothing
to do with lost sales, that I feel embarrassed for anyone actually
supporting this argument.

 

 

 

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Flawed analogy, a better one would be... "If a person picked up a paper in a supermarket, but put it back, without reading it before exiting the store. Would this person still owe the store money for
holding the paper?"

No, that would not be a better analogy unless you made a copy before putting it back on the shelf.  Your example is analogous to putting a game in your online shopping cart then removing it before checking out or simply closing your browser.  Nothing wrong with that and in both cases you would not owe the seller the purchase price (assuming you didn't damage the product or something like that).

- Someone downloads a game two times? Should they have to pay for the product EACH time?

Depends.  If the consumer bought the title in the first place and the seller allows for multiple downloads then no, of course not.

- Someone downloads a game to test it and then purchases it? Should they have to pay two times for the same product?

Assuming they didn't have the right to download it for testing purposes in the first place and the seller allows more than one download per purchase, I'd opine that later purchasing a legitamate copy fulfills the debt the seller is owed but does not completely absolve them from wrongdoing.

- A 10 year old kid, with no money, DLed 500 games? How do you turn this into lost revenue?

Easy.  You are owed the purchase price of the 500 pirated games.  Will you get that from suing the parents?  Maybe, maybe not.

- Someone who buys the game, but then download a cracked version to be able to play the game without DRM's? (E.g Ubisoft's draconian DRM, which will throw you out of a single player game, without saving the instant your connection makes a hickup.)

Sorry but you still don't have the right to do that (although personally, I'd turn a blind eye to it).  If you don't like the DRM (and who could blame you) then you can purchase the console version or don't buy it.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

let's say the msrp was set at $1,000,000,000 instead. Would they then be owed 1 billion dollars for each incidence of piracy? Damages in piracy cases are set to punish offenders. What the IP holder would have made is completly irrelevant.

my vanity is justified

my vanity is justified

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Sorry, didn't notice this comment until now but yes, whatever the purchase price was is what the seller is owed.

But please keep in mind, this is only a suggestion as to how the industry can more accurately quantify the extent of video game piracy, nothing more.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

If the industry wanted to accurately quantify the results of video game piracy they would have to take into account a number positive influences piracy has on sales.

my vanity is justified

my vanity is justified

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

While the extent of video game piracy and the result of video game piracy are two different things, that certainly would be an interesting report.  Even if such a thing were possible I doubt the industry would do it themselves or commission a third party to do so.  Oh well, guess we're stuck with the crap reporting and number fudging in service of a specific agenda.  Not that such a thing is unique to the video game industry of course.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

IP/CP in civil cases should be limited to 500$ unless a direct profit was made by the defendant then let them have the million dollar fines...


I have a dream, break the chains of copy right oppression! http://zippydsmlee.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/cigital-disobedience/


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

What if the game is only available through pirating channels (downloads)?  Or if it had invasive DRM that made the pirated copy better?  Would you say that the company is still owed? 

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I once had a dream about God. In it, he was looking down upon the planet and the havoc we recked and he said unto us, "Damn Kids get off my lawn!"

I once had a dream about God. In it, he was looking down upon the planet and the havoc we recked and he said unto us, "Damn Kids get off my lawn!"

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Yes, of course.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

What about the money owed to customers for issues caused by the DRM? Don't forget to add that into the equation too.

 

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

We're talking about software pirates.  Money owed to legitamate customers has nothing to do with it.


Andrew Eisen

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

Yes, but the DRM in AC2 is just ridiculous at best, and I have to disagree with your stand on games that can't be found anymore.  It's not the consumer's fault if the company shortens the shelf life of a game, they either have to buy it used (which the company complains about) or emulate it (piracy). 

---

I once had a dream about God. In it, he was looking down upon the planet and the havoc we recked and he said unto us, "Damn Kids get off my lawn!"

I once had a dream about God. In it, he was looking down upon the planet and the havoc we recked and he said unto us, "Damn Kids get off my lawn!"

Re: Handheld Piracy Report Numbers Called “Ridiculous”

"Yes, but the DRM in AC2 is just ridiculous at best..."

Doesn't matter.  Crap DRM does not justify piracy.

"It's not the consumer's fault if the company shortens the shelf life of a game, they either have to buy it used (which the company complains about) or emulate it (piracy)."

So buy it used.

 

Andrew Eisen

 
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Sora-ChanI realize that they have ways getting around it, but one reason might be due to earthquakes.04/17/2014 - 4:42am
Matthew WilsonSF is a tech/ economic/ trade center it should be mostly tail building. this whole problem is because of the lack of tail buildings. How would having tail apartment buildings destroy SF? having tail buildings has not runed other cities around the US/world04/16/2014 - 10:51pm
Matthew WilsonAgain the issue is you can not build upwards anywhere in SF at the moment, and no you would not. You would bring prices to where they should have been before the market distortion. those prices are not economic or socially healthy.04/16/2014 - 10:46pm
ZippyDSMleeYou still wind up pushing people out of the non high rise aeras but tis least damage you can do all things considered.04/16/2014 - 10:26pm
ZippyDSMleeANd by mindlessly building upward you make it like every place else hurting property prices,ect,ect. You'll have to slowly segment the region into aeras where you will never build upward then alow some aeras to build upward.04/16/2014 - 10:25pm
Matthew WilsonSF have to build upwards they have natural growth limits. they can not grow outwards. ps growing outwards is terable just look at Orlando or Austin for that.04/16/2014 - 4:15pm
ZippyDSMleeIf they built upward then it would becoem like every other place making it worthless, if they don't build upward they will price people out making it worthless, what they need to do is a mix of things not just one exstreme or another.04/16/2014 - 4:00pm
Matthew Wilsonyou know the problem in SF was not the free market going wrong right? it was government distortion. by not allowing tall buildings to be build they limited supply. that is not free market.04/16/2014 - 3:48pm
ZippyDSMleeOh gaaa the free market is a lie as its currently leading them to no one living there becuse they can not afford it makign it worthless.04/16/2014 - 3:24pm
Matthew WilsonIf you have not read http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2014/04/introducing-steam-gauge-ars-reveals-steams-most-popular-games/ you should. It is a bit stats heavy, but worth the read.04/16/2014 - 2:04pm
Matthew Wilsonthe issue is when is doesn't work it can screw over millions in new york city's case. more often than not it is better to let the free market run its course without market distortion.04/16/2014 - 9:36am
NeenekoTrue, and overdone stagnation is a problem. It is a tricky balance. It does not help that when it does work, no one notices. Most people here have benifited from rent controls and not even realized it.04/16/2014 - 9:23am
ZippyDSMleehttp://www.afterdawn.com/news/article.cfm/2014/04/15/riaa_files_civil_suit_against_megaupload04/16/2014 - 8:48am
ZippyDSMleeEither way you get stagnation as people can not afford the prices they set.04/16/2014 - 8:47am
Neenekowell, specifically it helps people already living there and hurts people who want to live there instead. As for 'way more hurt', majorities generally need less legal protection. yes it hurt more people then it helped, it was written for a minority04/16/2014 - 8:30am
MaskedPixelantehttp://torrentfreak.com/square-enix-drm-boosts-profits-and-its-here-to-stay-140415/ Square proves how incredibly out of touch they are by saying that DRM is the way of the future, and is here to stay.04/16/2014 - 8:29am
james_fudgeUnwinnable Weekly Telethon playing Metal Gear http://www.twitch.tv/rainydayletsplay04/16/2014 - 8:06am
ConsterTo be fair, there's so little left of the middle class that those numbers are skewing.04/16/2014 - 7:42am
Matthew Wilsonyes it help a sub section of the poor, but hurt both the middle and upper class. in the end way more people were hurt than helped. also, it hurt most poor people as well.04/16/2014 - 12:13am
SeanBJust goes to show what I have said for years. Your ability to have sex does not qualify you for parenthood.04/15/2014 - 9:21pm
 

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