China Moves to Protect Young Online Gamers

Beginning August 1, online game operators in China will be forced to take a series of steps to protect online gamers under the age of 18 from inappropriate content and selling or buying items using virtual currency.

According to the Xinhua News Agency, online games created for minors will have to lose any content that would lead to “imitation of behavior that violates social morals and the law.” The regulations deal with content that is horrifying, cruel or otherwise unwholesome, specifically any portrayals of “pornography, cults, superstitions, gambling and violence.”

The virtual currency ban was said to be made possible by a new rule that online game players must register game accounts using their real name.

Gaming operators were also told to “develop techniques that would limit the gaming time of minors in order to prevent addiction, though without specifying what kinds of techniques and a permissible gaming time.”

Bloomberg reported that shares in Tencent Holdings Ltd., described as China’s largest Internet company in terms of market value, and a “leading provider of virtual currency services,” saw its shares fall as much as 5.3 percent after the new regulations were announced.

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  1. 0
    Bigman-K says:

    All this protect the children stuff is mindboggeling. I mean what exactly do children need to be protected from when it comes to video games?

    Video games don’t sexually molest or violently harass children nor do they cause them to enter an altered or trans like state like alcohol and drugs can do causing them to commit actions which they wouldn’t otherwise do in their normal state of mind.

    It seems to me to be nothing more then an indirect form of state-based thought and mind control. The nanny-state doesn’t like the ideas and messages presented in the games so they want to restrict access to them. Of course this is China which has no Freedom of Speech or Expression so I guess my point is moot.

     "No law means no law" – Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black on the First Amendment

  2. 0
    CMiner says:

    specifically any portrayals of “pornography, cults, superstitions, gambling and violence.”


    So, for game content for minors, they just banned… everything?

  3. 0
    Cheater87 says:

    When I imported Siren from Hong Kong it came with a BIG sticker on it saying "18 and over don’t play infront of, sell, lend, hire etc this game to anyone under the age of 18."

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