China Bans “Vulgar” Game Adverts

China’s Ministry of Culture has grown weary of online game companies using vulgar, violent or profane tactics in order to lure consumers to purchase their titles, so it has banned the practice.

The BBC reports that, beginning next month, Chinese officials will be able to force website owners to delete any vulgar content employed in online promotions. Supposedly, one model named Shou Shou (pictured), who was recently embroiled in a sex video controversy, was asked to promote a role-playing game while another unnamed Japanese adult film star was being used to draw attention to the Game Warrior OL.

 “Social commentators” worried that the practice, though not illegal at the time, could “undermine the public’s morals. “

The BBC added that, “The new policy has been covered widely in the state-controlled media and on websites here, accompanied of course by photos of the same scantily clad models who have upset the bureaucrats.” Who are we to break ranks?

Update: AFP adds a specific date for the implementation (August 1), while noting that users who sign up to play a game will also have to use "a valid identity card," after that date, a move which was alluded to earlier.

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  1. 0
    Spartan says:

    She is cute. I would stop playing a video game to play with her but wait, is that not the goal of such policies?


    "The most difficult pain a man can suffer is to have knowledge of much and power over little" – Herodotus

  2. 0
    JustChris says:

    What were they afraid men would do if they see these ads? Stop whatever they’re doing and get their jollies in public? Maybe the government should just ride it out instead of predicting stuff when it comes to moral issues.


  3. 0
    gellymatos says:

    Is any one really surprised? It’s China. Nuff said. 


    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." -Albert Einstein

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