BFG Tech Redefines the Term ‘Lifetime Warranty’

Gamers are very familiar with BFG Tech and their graphics cards. But some owners of their most recent ones will find that the lifetime warranty the company promised in the box when they bought their cards is no longer being honored by the company in the face of a reorganization. Now you know that when a company says "lifetime guarantee" they don’t mean the life of the product – they mean the life of the company’s interest in the product.

Some consumers, looking for return merchandise authorization (RMA) codes from BFG Tech to return defective merchandise, are instead receiving denial letters. These letters – short, sweet and to the point, say the following:

BFG Technologies Inc. is in the process of winding down and liquidating its business. Unfortunately, our major supplier would not support our business. As a result, we are returning your graphics card without being able to repair it. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Inconvenient indeed. Earlier this year BFG Tech announced that it was leaving the graphics card business behind, but promised to honor its warranties. Now the company is singing a different tune even while it wants to sell consumers gaming machines and power supplies. The company is also still showing off some new graphics cards on its web site. Read the fine print if you plan on buying one of those, for obvious reasons.


Source: HardwareCanucks

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  1. 0
    jedidethfreak says:

    They’re closing down, so there really isn’t one.  If nobody’s going to be picking up the tab, there’s literally nobody to sue in the first place.

    Think about it – if you bought a car, and that car company shut down, nobody’s going to honor the warranty, since nobody will be paying on it.

    With the first link, the chain is forged.

  2. 0
    Thad says:

    Wonder what the legal implications of this are — if they’ve filed for bankruptcy, that might get them out of liability for outstanding warranties.  If they haven’t, they may very well be liable for breach of contract or false advertising.

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