PS3 May Have Fallen Victim to Crackers

Sony’s PlayStation 3 has remained remarkably resilient to piracy, until now perhaps.

An article on a EuroGamer blog (thanks The Escapist) uses a pair of YouTube videos (here’s the first, the other is embedded above) from user OzModChips as the basis for its article.

The movies were made after OzModChips apparently received an anonymous package from Hong Kong, which was sent to various resellers of mod chips.

The process described:

…a combination of software and USB dongle that seemingly allows all makes and model of retail PlayStation 3 to copy and run any kind of game code, even with the latest firmware updates in place

…the dongle itself appears to be activated when the system is booted by holding down the power followed by the eject button. This might suggest that the USB dongle is an adapted form of debug equipment used by Sony itself in testing production and refurbished PS3s, and several consoles locked into "factory mode" have escaped into the wild before now.

Or, it all could be an elaborate ruse.

Of course, we in no way advocate the use of such cracks, devices or tactics.

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  1. 0
    Flamespeak says:

    Literally, the only things this product does is allow for folks to make copies of Blu-ray video games (no BR Movies, DVD movies or games, or CD games). It is supposed to work on the principle that people get a bunch of games through Blockbuster or Gamefly and copy them onto their hard drive so they can pull them up and play them as long as a spinning game is inserted into the drive. This particular hack is literally just for making bootleg versions of games.

    I don’t personally believe it works though. It would appear this only works with dev consoles. It may though, but considering they are charging folks about $150 AUS for the product, I smell scam. I smell a lot of scam.

  2. 0
    Tina Russell says:

    Wait, what, GamePolitics?! What on Earth is wrong with unlocking functionality on a console that you bought and own?

    (After all, after Sony erased Linux support from customers’ PS3s in a rather spectacular forced downgrade, hacking is the only way to install it. That’s just one example of the content industry trying to take away consumers’ rights, and we let it happen by accepting their framing of hacking one’s own system as somehow illegitimate.)

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