Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

October 11, 2010 -

According to a report on the Media & Entertainment Services Alliance, a new rule from Consumer Product Safety Commission may make it so that packaged media like DVDs, videogames, and other products aimed at children will have tracking labels attached to them (PDF).

Part of the Consumer Products Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA), the rule was meant to satisfy a congressional mandate for safety recalls on children’s products related to things like lead levels from toys and other products from China.

Most DVDs and videogames are not supposed to be subject to the new rule, but as EMA VP of Public Affairs Sean Bersell points out, some children’s entertainment may be classified by the CPSC as "children’s products." under this new rule anyway. The CPSC interprets a children's product as a "consumer product designed or intended primarily for children twelve years of age or younger."

In a note to EMA members, Bersell says that the rule provides "no blanket exemption for movies and video games aimed at children under age four." This is apparently a reversal of an earlier proposed interpretation. Bersell adds that the agency "had previously suggested that very young children lack the motor skills to personally use the products and the physical products themselves (as opposed to the content they contain) have no appeal to children."

This new rule takes effect upon publication in the Federal Register, located here.

Source: MESA Alliance


Comments

Re: Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

I wonder what this law will mean for makers of trading cards aimed at children considering the labels in question have to be permanent and remain with the product. It wouldn't do to label the packaging, as that is usually intended to be thrown away. It also wouldn't do to label a single card in each foil package, for cards in a given package are unlikely to remain together in the long term. Does this mean each card have to be labeled individually, effectively defacing the carefully-designed artwork on each card?

This is the kind of ill-thought law that really bugs me. Instead of requiring products to be labeled, how about requiring manufacturers to, in the event of a recall, recall all products that are indistinguishable from those being recalled? Manufacturers could then add distinguishing marks as they see fit and weigh the costs of doing so against the likelihood and costs of a potential recall.

Re: Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

This has absolutely nothing to do with the ratings of the game or maturity of the intended audience.  This was a horrible law created out of overreaction to the various toy recalls that makes it so every component of an item meant for children must be tested for dangerous substances (i.e. lead).  The testing is about $500 per test, so if you have a complex toy with dozens of parts, this can start to get expensive.

The basic effect is that small businesses are being run out of business, while Mattel (who were the reason this law was enacted) were given an opt out of the law and are the only company allowed to test all of their products in house.  Oh...and guess who just issued another $10 million toy recall...

Mattel.

I'm all for protecting the children, but this is a horrible, horrible law.

Re: Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

Big Corporations have a long history of lobbying for restrictive laws and regulations for their industry for solely the purpose of keeping newer companies from forming. It happens in the toy business, the software industry, the copyright industry, even cosmetology. Government regulation is the friend of people and companies with deep pockets.

E. Zachary Knight
Oklahoma City Chapter of the ECA
http://www.theeca.com/chapters_oklahoma

Re: Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

Perhaps so, but only when the regulations are WRITTEN by those deep-pocketed companies.

Which, unfortunately, is the majority of the time.

Re: Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

Shit, really? That's fucked all to hell...

Oh shit! Hasbro! Transformers! They got a shit load of little parts. I hope this doesn't fuck them too bad... Or LEGOS! Not my precious LEGOS man, not my LEGOS...

Re: Games, DVDs, may be Subject to New CPSC Rule

Interesting.

This could actually be quite helpful, because if the age of twelve is the threshold for a game being "aimed at children", according to the government itself (which I'm not sure if this counts), that means that Leland Yee and his ilk should have some difficulty in claiming that the game industry markets its "ultra violent and graphic sex games" to minors, as the only games that would even remotely qualify for that are all labeled M for Mature. As in, not for kids twelve and below.

 
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Poll: Is it censorship when a private retailer decides not to sell a particular video game?:

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WymorenceOh sweet god, Kung Fury is freaking awesome...05/28/2015 - 10:03pm
E. Zachary KnightWonder, I know you can revise content and resubmit it, but I can't findany information about a formal appeals process.05/28/2015 - 7:27pm
Wonderkarpever wonder if there's an appeals process for AO?05/28/2015 - 6:55pm
Matthew WilsonDanny and Andy play the first couple of levels of the upcoming Hatred http://www.gamespot.com/videos/hatred-gamespot-plays/2300-6425016/ imho it does not look like it should be AO.05/28/2015 - 5:57pm
Andrew EisenHey, remember Kung Fury? That short film that was funded via Kickstarter a few years ago? You can watch it now. I suggest you do. It's fun! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bS5P_LAqiVg05/28/2015 - 5:14pm
Goth_SkunkOriginally, yes. Some content was cut out in order to reduce its ratign from AO down to M, but PC users could work around that an unlock the full content by means of a patch. Which is what I did. :D05/28/2015 - 3:56pm
Andrew EisenKarp - Yes, for strong sexual content. Although the recent remaster contains all that content and was rated M.05/28/2015 - 3:54pm
Andrew EisenDepends on if you consider Hatred misrated. I haven't played the game or seen the ESRB's rating summary so I'm undecided.05/28/2015 - 3:53pm
WonderkarpDidnt Fahrenheit have an AO?05/28/2015 - 3:52pm
Matthew Wilson@AE that is why I said it seems more moral panic to me.05/28/2015 - 3:51pm
Andrew EisenMatthew - From what I've seen (just the trailers) the game is nowhere near as gory as many, many other games. But again, I'm guessing the AO rating comes from theme and tone rather than outright gore.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
Andrew EisenKarp - It didn't show penetration or nudity.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
WonderkarpI'd say Mortal Kombat X has more Gore and Violence than Hatred.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
Matthew Wilsonwhat I mean by worse in this case its not more gory/violent than others.05/28/2015 - 3:48pm
WonderkarpI forget....did Hot Coffee actually show Penetration?05/28/2015 - 3:48pm
Andrew EisenKarp - The Skyrim mods are external mods. The Hot Coffee mod unlocked content on the disc. Big difference. Still, the content that was unlocked was still perfectly in line with an M rating in my opinion.05/28/2015 - 3:47pm
Andrew EisenThemes are factored into ratings, not just mechanics. Still waiting for ESRB's rating summary. Very curious to see what it has to say.05/28/2015 - 3:46pm
Matthew WilsonHatred is a top down shooter though, and isnt any worse than other top down shooters?05/28/2015 - 3:45pm
Wonderkarpyeah, San Andreases rerating was ridiculous. Why not rerate Skyrim with all its crazy sex mods out there? But yeah, ESRB is good as policing itself. 05/28/2015 - 3:45pm
Andrew EisenManhunt 2 and Hatred though? Eh, there's an argument to be made for the higher rating.05/28/2015 - 3:43pm
 

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