Blizzard Clarifies SC II Single-Player Bannings

In response to a story from earlier in the week that Blizzard was banning players from StarCraft 2 who used trainers or cheats in the game’s single-player component, the company issued a clarification.

The web site Cheat Happens had claimed that gamers who used its trainers, which grants users unlimited ammo or other cheats, in SC 2’s single-player element resulted in users having their accounts suspended, or their CD keys disabled.

In an article on IGN, Blizzard stated that they are not banning players just for cheating StarCraft 2’s single player, but that it was banning for hacks installed which affected both the single player and multiplayer parts of the game:

It’s important to point out first, that many of the 3rd-party hacks and cheats developed for StarCraft II contain both single and multiplayer functionality.

In order to protect the integrity of multiplayer competition, we are actively detecting cheat programs used in multiplayer modes whether there are human opponents or not.

The company stated that “any players who opt to use any type of 3rd party hacks do so at their own risk,” adding that “there are already built-in cheat codes for StarCraft II single-player that can be used safely.”

Cheat Happens, responding to the Blizzard statement, said that the newly issued proclamation “completely contradicts” earlier correspondence it had receive from Blizzard support.

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  1. 0
    Neeneko says:

    Then why do single player 3rd party ‘cheating’ applications exist then?   That seems like a lot of work for someone to go through if the equivelent tools are already in game.

  2. 0
    lordlundar says:

    Cheathappens trainers are specifically designed not to function in multiplayer. In some cases, the trainer even blocks the multiplayer connection if someone makes an attempt. Unfortunately, other trainer makers just slap together theirs and don’t care that they can be used in MP, or even design ones to be specifically used for MP games.

    The real problem comes from the Warden program that is used to catch the trainers. It’s running so long as the game is and doesn’t differentiate between online play or offline play (and given the setup for SC2, the campaign and skirmish mode even qualify as ‘multiplayer modes with no other human opponents’). So it just tags any program that might affect the game (yes, it has tagged antivirus programs as well) and reports it.

  3. 0
    Mr. Stodern says:

    Well, I’m not sure which side to believe here, but to be honest, I’m leaning towards Blizzard, for the simple fact that previously released statements from Cheat Happens have clearly misled me.

    Not to mention that I’m a little reluctant to trust most sites dedicated to making hacks and cheat available for games that are already full of cheats, especially online multiplayer games.

    And if this is truly a case of people using cheats specifically designed for use in single and multiplayer, then I retract my previous comments about flaws in the game’s system.

  4. 0
    BigRedNutcase says:

    All blizz says is to use their built in cheats and to not use 3rd party hacks.

    You can screw around in single player all you please and all the tools to do so are already provided in game.

  5. 0
    GrimCW says:

    so wait, if i finish the game and decide to screw around with a trainer in SP or skirmish mode alone i get banned?

    thank god i don’t care for B.Net anyways since i quit post SC1’s hackfest of MP.

    and before someone says "well its a lot better now!" after reading thing i don’t really care much…

    its like saying i can play the game once, get bored, and i’m no longer allowed to do anything new in the game just for giggles. If i want an RTS thats like that i’ll go play Halo Wars some more.

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