George Mason Teacher Lectures on Game Addiction

A George Mason University teacher believes that society is blind to the permeation of videogame addiction in college students; a problem so widespread that she believes it is swelling the number of dropouts.

Demonstrating less tactfulness than Rush Limbaugh (yes, that was odd to write), Erica Jacobs kicks off her column by alluding that Virginia Tech shooter Seung-Hui Cho’s addiction to Counter-Strike contributed to his actions, before recounting the tale a student of hers told about a roommate at school that became so addicted to World of Warcraft, he eventually dropped out.

After this paper was read in Jacobs’ class, "each [of the other students] had a similar story of a family member or friend who was addicted to a video game.”

Jacobs goes on to reference a 2008 speech by (then) FCC Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate, who billed online game addiction as “one of the top reasons” students dropping out of college.

“No one is immune from addiction,” wrote Jacobs, who continued:

We cope with addictions to alcohol and drugs more readily than addictions to video games, and that blindness has put many college students in jeopardy of failing school. As we know, recognizing that a problem exists is the first step to dealing with it.

Remember, the addict could be you.

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