President Taps Commerce for Internet I.D.

Correction: The U.S. Commerce Department contacted us to let us know that the national I.D. program is completely voluntary. In our earlier report we erroneously reported that it was not a voluntary program. Our original wording was "The Internet I.D. would give every American a unique online identity overseen by the Commerce Department."

According to the public affairs officer for the Commerce Department, "Every American will not need an ID and private organizations or others that conduct online transactions would opt in to a system that is led by private industry in partnership with federal agencies like DOC."

Details on what the program consist of can be found at www.nist.gov/nstic.

Original Story: President Obama is tapping the United States Commerce to administer an Internet identification solutions as part of a broader "cyber-security measure." The Internet I.D. would give every American a unique online identity overseen by the Commerce Department. The President alluded to such a measure in September of last year, though many in the Internet community were concerned that the NSA or the Homeland Security would be in charge of such a program. A draft proposal of the program comes in a few months.

Speaking at an event at the Stamford Institute, U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said that the system would not be like a "national ID card" or a "government controlled system," but a means to "enhance security" and reduce the need to memorize multiple passwords.

The Administration writes the "National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace" now.

Source: Engadget

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