Survey Says: Online Gamers Aren't Dorky Loners

February 7, 2011 -

A new survey from Bigpoint reveals that the stereotypes associated with online gamers are false. A global survey of 6,663 "online gamers" found that most considered themselves well-rounded individuals with real world friends, good looking, and in relatively good health. The Bigpoint Gamer Survey presents a different image of online gamers - attractive, healthy, cultured, and popular with the opposite sex.

Around 62 percent of players said they had more friends in real life than online. Around 55 percent of players under 20 said they have more real friends than online friends, and 73 percent over the age of 50 claimed to have more real-life friendships. A total of 28 percent of the people met most of their friends online and went on to meet them in real life. Only a tenth of all gamers said that their only real friends were online gamers.

More than half of them – 52 percent said that they meet up with their friends regularly each month. A third (34 percent) claim to see their friends on a daily basis, though most of these tended to be younger players.

Bigpoint press officer Janine Griffel said that the image of the lone gamer playing on their own may be a thing of the past:

"Our study shows that online gamers are attractive individuals with healthy and active social lives. Social and casual games are very popular among our users for the reason that they emphasize being social. The trend’s definitely moving away from single-player games to social-based experiences."

By region, 40 percent of all surveyed players came from Turkey, 21 percent from Germany, 14 percent from France, and 11 percent from the United States. Approximately 58 percent of participants were under the age of 20, 26 percent were between the ages of 21–30, and 20 percent were aged 31–40. Only 12 percent were older than 40 and 5 percent were older than 50. The majority of participants - 89 percent were male. Around 32 percent were married, 61 percent were single, and 6 percent were either divorced or separated.

The full details of this survey will be released at Casual Connect February 8–10, in Hamburg, Germany.


Comments

Re: Survey Says: Online Gamers Aren't Dorky Loners

The article states the online gamers they surveyed claim to have more friends in real life than interent friends and that they are good looking: That is no different than asking anyone else who has good self-esteem. The idea of claiming to have more online friends than friends in real life would be some what embarrasing in the society we live in. Nevertheless, online friends are still friends.

I think they are missing the bigger picture here. If loners are willing to do a survey, it would most likely involve a token of exchange, and they wouldn't mind claiming to be loners. AND just because someone who plays online doesn't necessarily exclude them from being a loner. Online gaming is purely perspective. Having skill in a game does involve a lot of pressure from the community, especially if you always join servers under the same name... And of course some people play online just to play, no chit-chat.

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"Because this town is under the stranglehold of a few tight eyed Tree Huggers who would rather play Hacky Sack than lock up the homeless" -- Birch Barlow

---------------------------------------- "Because this town is under the stranglehold of a few tight eyed Tree Huggers who would rather play Hacky Sack than lock up the homeless" -- Birch Barlow

Re: Survey Says: Online Gamers Aren't Dorky Loners

Dorky loners get a bad rap. They're blamed for almost every anti-social problem, up to and including serial murder. Yet the fact is, most serial killers are frustrated extroverts. Real loners want to be left alone, so going out in search of victims hardly fits their MO.

As for gaming, anyone who seeks out friends online is by definition NOT a loner. Online gamers are social by definition, so the results of this survey are hardly surprising or a 'news' item. Now if the survey polled gamers who DON'T play online, THAT'S where the real loners are. We don't play online because, apart from a very few trusted friends, we want the rest of this planet's arseholes to leave us the hell alone.

 
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MechaTama31to be done, and some people really need jobs.07/11/2014 - 5:41pm
MechaTama31Info, I think you don't really understand just how crappy a lot of the jobs are that provide the "basics" that you assume will just continue to be produced under such a system. There's very little pride or prestige to be had from such jobs, but they need07/11/2014 - 5:40pm
Andrew EisenMaskedPixelante - That's probably because it's now available on the Wii U eShop for $8.07/11/2014 - 5:18pm
InfophileThat's not how human psychology works. It's all about "Keeping up with the Joneses." When everyone around you has a new fancy smartphone and is talking about that cool HBO series, do you want to be the one left out?07/11/2014 - 4:05pm
Matthew WilsonThe issue is most people would settle for the basics and not work. That is why we would need very heavy automation to make a system like that work. Almost all labor intensive tasks would have to be done by robot.07/11/2014 - 2:32pm
InfophileOf course, that's a gross oversimplification. The idea, have a basic safety net that pays for what's needed to live. If people can find a job and are willing to work, they get more money which can be spent on comfort and perks.07/11/2014 - 11:33am
InfophileIt's quite possible to get an economy to work with a basic minimum standard of living. You just need perks for the people who do work. Everyone gets food and a home. Everyone who works also gets an iPhone.07/11/2014 - 11:32am
MaskedPixelanteIn the continuing adventures of "Stuff I figured would be overpriced on eBay but isn't", 15 bucks for a copy of Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga.07/11/2014 - 10:04am
SleakerI didn't gather the same conclusion.. Seems like they are focusing on devices & services still, just not calling it 'devices and services'07/11/2014 - 8:57am
PHX CorpMicrosoft CEO readies big shakeup, drops devices and services focus http://www.theverge.com/2014/7/10/5887143/satya-nadella-microsoft-ceo-employee-email07/11/2014 - 8:45am
MechaTama31declared that everybody should have them. Somebody still has to produce them.07/11/2014 - 7:44am
MechaTama31I do mean the developers/governmet. And money is not the only thing of value. I am including the food, housing, etc that everybody is supposed to get for free under this system. In the real world, those things don't exist merely because an authority has07/11/2014 - 7:43am
InfophileAs automation gets better and better, the number of jobs absolutely required keeps diminishing. How many people these days do you think are actually needed to keep everyone alive? Most people just make our lives more convenient and entertaining.07/11/2014 - 4:43am
Matthew Wilsonthat kind of system only works when most people (around 70 to 80 percent ) do not need to work.07/11/2014 - 1:21am
TechnogeekConjured up by who, though? If by the players, then it's not really "on a whim" since they're kind of putting work into it. If you mean the developers/government, then hello and welcome to monetary sovereignty.07/11/2014 - 12:34am
MechaTama31I'm just saying, when everything of value can be conjured up at a whim, that's not an economy. That's a fantasy.07/11/2014 - 12:15am
TechnogeekHonestly, though, what I find most thought-provoking about the article isn't the guaranteed minimum income aspect at all, but a more fundamental point: that we treat poverty as a moral failing on the individual, rather than a design flaw in the system.07/10/2014 - 11:53pm
TechnogeekOr, if your concern is that people won't even bother to work at all if their basic needs are met...well, let me put it this way: do you really want people like that in the workforce anyway?07/10/2014 - 11:51pm
TechnogeekAlso, you raise a valid question, but I'd argue that as things stand we're artificially limiting the amount of "gold/silver" that could be produced. The whole "work a job you hate to pay the bills" thing meshes poorly with the entreprenurial spirit.07/10/2014 - 11:49pm
TechnogeekSeriously, though, it looks at how in-game economies work and what lessons can be applied to reality, focusing primarily on multiple currency systems. Such systems do exist in real life (food stamps, for example), although generally aren't seen as such.07/10/2014 - 11:43pm
 

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