NCAA President Acknowledges Inequity in Player Compensation

March 30, 2011 -

NCAA president Mark Emmert said that the organization dedicated to collegiate sports will not stray from its long-standing tenet of not directly paying college sports players.

"It’s grossly unacceptable and inappropriate to pay players … converting them from students to employees," Mark Emmert tells USA Today.

But Emmert also acknowledges that it might be time for the organization to spread some of the revenue it generates from licensing around to players in one way or another. While he is not making any promises, Emmert thinks it would be acceptable to compensate players in other ways such as increasing the amount of money paid towards scholarships and other college expenses.

“I will make clear,” he says, “that I want this to be a subject we explore.”

Emmert says that he will tackle the topic at the NCAA’s board meetings in April.

But Emmert talks as if he has a choice. Either the NCAA figures it out on its own or players - current and former - may get the answers they want through litigation.

According to a USA Today report syndicated through the Tucson Citizen, the NCAA generates approximately $771 million a year in television licensing rights alone. This excludes video games, apparel and more.

Many others see inequality when it comes to the way the NCAA uses college athletes to make millions of dollars. North Carolina Hall of Fame basketball coach Roy Williams wonders aloud why athletic scholarships do not measure up to top academic awards, such as UNC’s Morehead-Cain scholarship. That academic award pays for travel, computers and other important extras. He would like to see the NCAA give a little bit more back to players.

"..those kids are saying, ‘Look at all this money we’re bringing in. And I have to beg, borrow and steal to get an extra meal?," says Williams.

Former NCAA head Cedric Dempsey agrees:

"It puts intercollegiate athletics in a precarious position," says former NCAA executive director Cedric Dempsey. "When you see the money and the kind of salaries you see now and the only group in the system that hasn’t received any additional funding is at the student-athlete level."

You can read a more detailed report of the pros and cons of compensating NCAA players here. It is an interesting discussion and one that all involved agree needs to be addressed.

On a related note, HBO's Real sports will explore the topic at length tonight in prime time special.

Posted in

Comments

Re: NCAA President Acknowledges Inequity in Player ...

Not only would I like to see what the NCAA is proposing here take place. I would also like to see at least 10% of profits go to a national account used to bring smaller colleges student resources like books / housing / equipment / TEACHER PAY up to par with the bigger colleges resources.

The colleges directly profit off of these kids athletic talent. It's about time they spread the love to make colleges around the nation better.

 
Forgot your password?
Username :
Password :

Poll

Which video game platform are you most thankful for?:

Shout box

You're not permitted to post shouts.
Andrew EisenThe story you just linked to? The story you asked if anyone had seen? Yes, THAT obnoxiousness. I've heard it parroted for nearly two years now.11/27/2014 - 7:57pm
ZippyDSMleeAndrew Eisen: That shes an ex con man?11/27/2014 - 7:54pm
Andrew EisenI've heard the same obnoxious horse poo for years. It's nothing new.11/27/2014 - 7:45pm
ZippyDSMleeAlso anyone see this? http://guardianlv.com/2014/11/anita-sarkeesian-unmasked-feminist-icon-or-con-artist/11/27/2014 - 7:28pm
ZippyDSMleeEvil within is a badly designed game.11/27/2014 - 7:28pm
Andrew EisenSure but you said "widens," hence my confusion. Looking into it, yep, there's a tweak to completely re-frame the image, adding more info at the top and bottom. You apparently need a fairly beefy rig to keep it running smooth when you do that though.11/27/2014 - 6:48pm
Matthew Wilsonthere is vertical fov, not just horizontal fov11/27/2014 - 6:38pm
Andrew EisenWell, you can widen it to 3:1 or even 10:1 but I don't know why you'd want to. From what I understand it's the missing visual info at the top and bottom that some object to, not that there isn't enough on either side.11/27/2014 - 6:36pm
Matthew WilsonI think it widenss the fov, so you get to see more.11/27/2014 - 6:31pm
Andrew EisenI don't see how as doing so would not add any visual information to the top or bottom of the screen.11/27/2014 - 6:04pm
Matthew Wilsonfrom what I read, getting rid of the black bars and stretching it out made for a better play experience.11/27/2014 - 5:59pm
Andrew EisenFrom what I hear, there's a ton of "look up and shoot at the guys above you" stuff in the game that the wider frame doesn't accommodate such actions well.11/27/2014 - 5:55pm
Andrew EisenHaving a game run in scope is not necessarily a bad thing but like any aspect ratio, you have to compose your shots correctly.11/27/2014 - 5:55pm
Neo_DrKefkaThe Evil Within was pretty bad and to make it worse the way the screen size made it hard for you to see even on a big screen it really hurt the game. Being Artistic is great but when you focus on art rather than what sells you run the risk of that happen11/27/2014 - 5:33pm
Matthew WilsonI kinda hope this is not true. http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2014/11/nintendo_might_not_be_making_more_gamecube_controller_adapters_at_the_moment11/27/2014 - 1:34pm
Matthew WilsonI saw that. I wish people would stop preording, but sadly that will never happen.11/27/2014 - 1:26pm
Papa MidnightUbisoft has cancelled the Season Pass for Assassin's Creed: Unity (http://www.reddit.com/r/pcmasterrace/comments/2ni2ac/ubisoft_cancel_season_pass_for_ac_unity/)11/27/2014 - 1:08pm
NeenekoBut now I can use the christmas discount justification too,11/27/2014 - 11:46am
NeenekoI am also sorely temped by Civ:BE, mostly because I have a demo coming up and I know my productivity will tank.11/27/2014 - 11:45am
MaskedPixelanteThe Evil Within is only a month old, right? And it's already 66% off...11/27/2014 - 10:29am
 

Be Heard - Contact Your Politician