NCAA President Acknowledges Inequity in Player Compensation

March 30, 2011 -

NCAA president Mark Emmert said that the organization dedicated to collegiate sports will not stray from its long-standing tenet of not directly paying college sports players.

"It’s grossly unacceptable and inappropriate to pay players … converting them from students to employees," Mark Emmert tells USA Today.

But Emmert also acknowledges that it might be time for the organization to spread some of the revenue it generates from licensing around to players in one way or another. While he is not making any promises, Emmert thinks it would be acceptable to compensate players in other ways such as increasing the amount of money paid towards scholarships and other college expenses.

“I will make clear,” he says, “that I want this to be a subject we explore.”

Emmert says that he will tackle the topic at the NCAA’s board meetings in April.

But Emmert talks as if he has a choice. Either the NCAA figures it out on its own or players - current and former - may get the answers they want through litigation.

According to a USA Today report syndicated through the Tucson Citizen, the NCAA generates approximately $771 million a year in television licensing rights alone. This excludes video games, apparel and more.

Many others see inequality when it comes to the way the NCAA uses college athletes to make millions of dollars. North Carolina Hall of Fame basketball coach Roy Williams wonders aloud why athletic scholarships do not measure up to top academic awards, such as UNC’s Morehead-Cain scholarship. That academic award pays for travel, computers and other important extras. He would like to see the NCAA give a little bit more back to players.

"..those kids are saying, ‘Look at all this money we’re bringing in. And I have to beg, borrow and steal to get an extra meal?," says Williams.

Former NCAA head Cedric Dempsey agrees:

"It puts intercollegiate athletics in a precarious position," says former NCAA executive director Cedric Dempsey. "When you see the money and the kind of salaries you see now and the only group in the system that hasn’t received any additional funding is at the student-athlete level."

You can read a more detailed report of the pros and cons of compensating NCAA players here. It is an interesting discussion and one that all involved agree needs to be addressed.

On a related note, HBO's Real sports will explore the topic at length tonight in prime time special.

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Re: NCAA President Acknowledges Inequity in Player ...

Not only would I like to see what the NCAA is proposing here take place. I would also like to see at least 10% of profits go to a national account used to bring smaller colleges student resources like books / housing / equipment / TEACHER PAY up to par with the bigger colleges resources.

The colleges directly profit off of these kids athletic talent. It's about time they spread the love to make colleges around the nation better.

 
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Andrew EisenHey, remember Kung Fury? That short film that was funded via Kickstarter a few years ago? You can watch it now. I suggest you do. It's fun! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bS5P_LAqiVg05/28/2015 - 5:14pm
Goth_SkunkOriginally, yes. Some content was cut out in order to reduce its ratign from AO down to M, but PC users could work around that an unlock the full content by means of a patch. Which is what I did. :D05/28/2015 - 3:56pm
Andrew EisenKarp - Yes, for strong sexual content. Although the recent remaster contains all that content and was rated M.05/28/2015 - 3:54pm
Andrew EisenDepends on if you consider Hatred misrated. I haven't played the game or seen the ESRB's rating summary so I'm undecided.05/28/2015 - 3:53pm
WonderkarpDidnt Fahrenheit have an AO?05/28/2015 - 3:52pm
Matthew Wilson@AE that is why I said it seems more moral panic to me.05/28/2015 - 3:51pm
Andrew EisenMatthew - From what I've seen (just the trailers) the game is nowhere near as gory as many, many other games. But again, I'm guessing the AO rating comes from theme and tone rather than outright gore.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
Andrew EisenKarp - It didn't show penetration or nudity.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
WonderkarpI'd say Mortal Kombat X has more Gore and Violence than Hatred.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
Matthew Wilsonwhat I mean by worse in this case its not more gory/violent than others.05/28/2015 - 3:48pm
WonderkarpI forget....did Hot Coffee actually show Penetration?05/28/2015 - 3:48pm
Andrew EisenKarp - The Skyrim mods are external mods. The Hot Coffee mod unlocked content on the disc. Big difference. Still, the content that was unlocked was still perfectly in line with an M rating in my opinion.05/28/2015 - 3:47pm
Andrew EisenThemes are factored into ratings, not just mechanics. Still waiting for ESRB's rating summary. Very curious to see what it has to say.05/28/2015 - 3:46pm
Matthew WilsonHatred is a top down shooter though, and isnt any worse than other top down shooters?05/28/2015 - 3:45pm
Wonderkarpyeah, San Andreases rerating was ridiculous. Why not rerate Skyrim with all its crazy sex mods out there? But yeah, ESRB is good as policing itself. 05/28/2015 - 3:45pm
Andrew EisenManhunt 2 and Hatred though? Eh, there's an argument to be made for the higher rating.05/28/2015 - 3:43pm
Andrew EisenRerating San Andreas was a mistake though. That seemed to be the result of kowtowing to public pressure.05/28/2015 - 3:42pm
Andrew EisenThere wasn't one. It's just a dumb rating.05/28/2015 - 3:42pm
WonderkarpI dont see Moral Panic with a racing game though05/28/2015 - 3:40pm
Matthew Wilson@AE when they tend to misrate games its normally because of moral panic surrounding it.05/28/2015 - 3:38pm
 

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