Canadian Teen Confesses to Murder Via a Bugged Xbox 360

A Canadian teenager was brought to justice by an Xbox 360, Guitar Hero, and an uncle who was already in trouble with the law. The combination has landed the unnamed teenager from Saskatoon, Canada in jail, according to a CBC report. Police had their suspicions that the young man had committed a murder so they approached his uncle to take him down. The murder in question took place in 2009; police allege that the boy murdered 16 year-old Charlotte Jolly with a stolen rifle after a fight in an alley.

The uncle was more than happy to participate in the sting because police promised to drop a drunk driving charge for his help.

The uncle invited his nephew into his home to play some Guitar Hero on the Xbox 360, but what the boy did not know was that police had secretly bugged the system. After a marathon session of the game, the boy confessed to his uncle – and unwittingly to the police. He has been arrested on murder charges and is in custody.

Some free advice to any murderers out there: loose lips sink ships.

Source: Kotaku

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  1. 0
    SpiralGray says:

    I so agree with this sentiment. This site is supposed to be "Where Politics and Video Games Collide" and it seems to have become "Anything That Remotely Mentions Video Games." Heck, even the stories about Sony’s woes aren’t really anything to do with politics. It seems that since Jack Thompson lost his voice this site has nothing to report so it’s just become another Kotaku.

  2. 0
    narcogen says:

    Heavens to betsy. This has nothing to do with gaming.

    If they’d tapped his phone and listened to a conversation he had on his iPhone, would it be iPhone news?

    Gaming is something ordinary people do. That includes people who commit crimes, people who witness crimes, and people who investigate crimes. 

    Can GP, as well as many other sites, stop treating tangential involvement of gaming hardware, software, or activities in otherwise unrelated events when those events are sensational– like murder or the investigation or prosecution of murder?

    At worst, it hurts the hobby when websites that claim to be serving gamers as an audience by continually associating it with things that most of the hobby’s proponents vehemently deny that it promotes– like violence.

    At best, it’s merely uninteresting because it’s actually got nothing to do with gaming. 

  3. 0
    DorthLous says:

    Are you ****ing with me? He took another person’s LIFE! Without any sort of valid reason. Unless rehabilitated, that person would not only be extremely dangerous free, but also, that’s the least owed to the lost one’s family and friends.

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