Australian Classification Board Revisits We Dare Rating

The Australian Classification Board said this week that it will rethink the current PG (Parental Guidance) rating for Ubisoft’s We Dare, a game which received heavy criticism earlier this year for its adult content and sexually suggestive mini-games. The review will be carried out on June 17 and will be conducted by the Classification Review Board. The re-review is the result of a formal complaint filed by Federal Minister for Home Affairs Brendan O’Connor. Chances are it will result in a higher rating for the title.

In March the board took some heat from the public over its decision to give the Ubisoft-published adult party game for the Wii a PG rating for "mild sexual references." A number of early media reports blamed the board for inappropriately rating the game, because of the trailer, which showed two couples engaged in some saucy and suggestive situations inspired by the game’s mini-games.

In Australia, the Classification Board of Australia rated We Dare PG, ignoring Ubisoft’s recommendation that they give the game an M rating. When the publisher says its game needs an "M" rating, it seems wise to heed such advice.

O’Connor tells GameSpot that media reports about the game led him to contact the Classification Board about We Dare:

"I asked the Classification Board to review We Dare following media reports that the game’s PG rating may be inappropriate. I believe that this game is unsuitable for children and I look forward to the outcome of the Classification Board’s review of its PG rating. I share the concern of many parents that children may be inadvertently playing games that are more suited to adult gamers."

Source: GameSpot by way of Andrew Eisen.

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    Andrew Eisen says:

    $20 says the only thing O’Connor knows about the game is what he read in the paper and didn’t bother to actually do any research on it before deeming it "unsuitable for children" and necessary to review for reclassification.


    Andrew Eisen

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