DCIA Joins ECA in Opposition of the Anti-Streaming Bill

July 18, 2011 -

The Distributed Computing Industry Association (DCIA) announced that it supports the Entertainment Consumer Association (ECA) in its opposition of US Senate Bill S. 978. The bill seeks to amend the criminal penalty provision for "criminal infringement of a copyright," and for other purposes. As the DCIA points out in its support statement, the bill is currently being fast-tracked through Congress without "adequate opportunities for critical review."

Here is an important part of the group's support of the ECA's efforts:

"If enacted, S.978 would amend current copyright law to include not only the unauthorized replication and redistribution of copyrighted works, but also 'public performances by electronic means.'

Specifically, US citizens would be subject to severe penalties, including felony-length prison sentences, for making or offering ten or more public performances by electronic means during any 180-day period of one or more copyrighted works; if the total retail value of the performances, or the total economic value of such public performances to the infringer or to the copyright owner, could exceed $2,500; or if the total fair market value of licenses to offer performances of those works would exceed $5,000.

While the bill is intended to ensure that the unauthorized streaming of copyrighted material is deemed unlawful, similar to the ways in which unlicensed downloading and uploading already is - which we strongly support in principle - its wording is so inarticulate as to potentially expose people to serious punishment for widely accepted, harmless, and frequently performed behaviors.
"

The group goes on to say that the bill's sponsors, Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and John Cornyn (R-TX) are misguided in introducing this legislation because it contains a "very dangerous measure" that would in many ways be "tantamount to repealing the First Amendment."

The group also points out that this bill comes at a time when game developers and publishers where sharing content such as photos and videos with the community is a feature. Because the law is so vague and doesn't address what fair use is, someone with a popular video containing gameplay or other copyrighted footage on YouTube could potentially get in trouble.

Finally the DCIA encourages the public, its supporters and it members to join in on the ECA's letter writing campaign.

Truly the only way to fight such a bill is to let your let your elected officials know that you strongly dislike what they are doing.

You can learn more about the DCIA's efforts here. The ECA's letter writing campaign is here.

[Full disclosure: GamePolitics is an ECA publication.]


Comments

Re: DCIA Joins ECA in Opposition of the Anti-Streaming Bill

Coming right off of Brown v. EMA, it feels like we just got done fighting the Nazis only to have to deal with the Soviets.

Re: DCIA Joins ECA in Opposition of the Anti-Streaming Bill

Already got my reply from the office of John Cornyn... he still doesn't "get it" and I fear he never will. He knows who keeps him in office and he knows it's not us citizens.

Re: DCIA Joins ECA in Opposition of the Anti-Streaming Bill

Plus, being a politician, he's set, so he's not effected by what effects the citizens, so until it effects him personally, he won't do anything.

Re: DCIA Joins ECA in Opposition of the Anti-Steaming Bill

We must stop STEAMING now! Think of the poor shirts and pants in dry cleaners around the coutnry! Yeah, you may want to fix your headline.

Noticed a couple other errors, you really need an editor or something.

 
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MaskedPixelantehttp://www.joystiq.com/2014/04/18/playstation-99-cent-sale-discounts-tokyo-jungle-super-stardust/ Weekend long PSN flash sale. So much stuff is 99 cents for the rest of the weekend.04/18/2014 - 5:59pm
Adam802http://www.polygon.com/2014/4/18/5627928/newtown-video-game-addiction-forum04/18/2014 - 4:14pm
Matthew Wilsonit is a video talking about why certain games/products/consoles do well, and others do not. he back it up with solid research.04/18/2014 - 3:56pm
Andrew EisenI'm not keen on blind links. What is it?04/18/2014 - 3:45pm
Matthew Wilsonthis is worth a whatch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyXcr6sDRtw&list=PL35FE5C4B157509C904/18/2014 - 3:43pm
MaskedPixelanteNumber 3: Night Dive was brought to the attention of the public by a massive game recovery, and yet most of their released catalogue consists of games that other people did the hard work of getting re-released.04/17/2014 - 8:46pm
MaskedPixelanteNumber 2: If Humongous Entertainment wanted their stuff on Steam, why didn't they talk to their parent company, which does have a number of games published on Steam?04/17/2014 - 8:45pm
MaskedPixelanteNumber 1: When Night Dive spent the better part of a year teasing the return of true classics, having their big content dump be edutainment is kind of a kick in the stomach.04/17/2014 - 8:44pm
Matthew Wilsonhttp://www.giantbomb.com/articles/jeff-gerstmann-heads-to-new-york-takes-questions/1100-4900/ He talks about the future games press and the games industry. It is worth your time even though it is a bit long, and stay for the QA. There are some good QA04/17/2014 - 5:28pm
IanCErm so they shouldn't sell edutainment at all? Why?04/17/2014 - 4:42pm
MaskedPixelanteNot that linkable, go onto Steam and there's stuff like Pajama Sam on the front-page, courtesy of Night Dive.04/17/2014 - 4:13pm
Andrew EisenOkay, again, please, please, PLEASE get in a habit of linking to whatever you're talking about.04/17/2014 - 4:05pm
MaskedPixelanteAnother round of Night Dive teasing and promising turns out to be stupid edutainment games. Thanks for wasting all our time, guys. See you never.04/17/2014 - 3:44pm
Matthew WilsonAgain the consequences were not only foreseeable, but very likely. anyone who understood supply demand curvs knew that was going to happen. SF has been a econ/trade hub for the last hundred years.04/17/2014 - 2:45pm
Andrew EisenMixedPixelante - Would you like to expand on that?04/17/2014 - 2:43pm
MaskedPixelanteWell, I am officially done with Night Dive Studios. Unless they can bring something worthwhile back, I'm never buying another game from them.04/17/2014 - 2:29pm
PHX Corphttp://www.msnbc.com/ronan-farrow/watch/video-games-continue-to-break-the-mold-229561923638 Ronan Farrow Daily on Video games breaking the mold04/17/2014 - 2:13pm
NeenekoAh yes, because by building something nice they were just asking for people to come push them out. Consequences are protested all the time when other people are implementing them.04/17/2014 - 2:06pm
Matthew Wilsonok than they should not protest when the consequences of that choice occur.04/17/2014 - 1:06pm
NeenekoIf people want tall buildings, plenty of other cities with them. Part of freedom and markets is communities deciding what they do and do not want built in their collective space.04/17/2014 - 12:55pm
 

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