The Sun Totally Misreads Nintendo 3DS Price Cut

You have to love the dramatic and often over-the-top stories from The Sun. The UK newspaper loves to write stories that can best be described as fictional. Not to infer that they lie; rather they make connections that aren't always there. Case in point is this story that comes to the conclusion that the reason Nintendo slashed the price on its 3DS was because of claims made earlier in the year by the paper (and a few other publications) that the device made its users feel "dizzy and sick."

There's some truth to their story, though not about the claims that the game gave users vertigo. For example they say that Nintendo admitted that 3DS sales did not meet expectations. That's certainly a true statement, especially considering that Nintendo's president took a pay cut.

They also quote MCV, which is a very reputable publication by anyone's measure:

"We all thought the 3DS would be popular. Which, as of yet, it hasn't really achieved."

So far, so good. But here's where The Sun gets a little bit crazy:

"But The Sun revealed a number of gamers quickly complained the 3D screen left them with headaches. Telly and radio presenter Jonathan Ross – a Nintendo champion – admitted that he got headaches after playing the console for a long time.

But others said the cutting-edge screen had IMPROVED their vision. Industry execs last night said the biggest problem was the games launched for the console simply weren't good enough.

One exec told Sun City:'"The 3DS just never really got going.'"

Thanks to Andrew Eisen for the tip and for having the voice of an angel.

[Disclaimer: The comments and opinions expressed in the story are the author's and don't represent the views of GamePolitics or parent company the ECA.]

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  1. 0
    Mr.Tastix says:

    The Sun is owned by the same people who owned News of the World.

    Sure, the actual individuals who run it will differ but honestly, is it really surprising that they exaggerate the truth? Most media outlets do.

    The truth doesn't make good entertainment… unless it's exaggerated.

  2. 0
    Austin from Oregon says:

    I trust newspapers way more than I trust TV news. I can read the stories in my own inflection, I can skip parts that look like mostly opinion, and it's harder for them to pair unrelated images in a newspaper.

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