UK Father Warns of the Deadly Combination of DVT and Video Games

August 1, 2011 -

A South Yorkshire man whose son died after playing video games for 12 hours straight due to complications with Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), is now campaigning to create a greater awareness about the condition and how it can be exacerbated with the excessive use of video games.

20-year-old Chris Staniforth died in May of this year after a marathon video gaming session turned deadly due to his DVT. Deep vein thrombosis (also commonly referred to as deep venous thrombosis or economy class syndrome) is the formation of a blood clot (called a "thrombus") in a deep vein. It is a form of thrombophlebitis (inflammation of a vein with clot formation).

Father David Staniforth thinks the condition may have been triggered by being immobile and playing games for 12 hours or more. David claims that his son would sometimes play online on his Xbox 360 for periods up to 12 hours.

The local coroner said a clot formed in Chris' left calf before moving to his lungs. This is typically one of the things that can occur with DVT. Once there, the clot can cause a fatal blockage, also called a pulmonary embolism.

While Chris's condition may have been exacerbated by playing games on Xbox Live, his father noted that it was not the activity that was the cause, but the long period of time spent doing it:

"After my research I saw there was no difference to Chris sitting at a desk on his Xbox and someone on a long-haul flight," David Staniforth said. "Sitting still is literally the danger zone. Chris loved to play and would stay up all night."

"Millions of people worldwide are playing these games for hours, and there is a risk," he added.

David Staniforth adds the he has no problem with playing games but he does want to warn parents and other DVT sufferers of the serious risk it poses. He plans to create a website for just that purpose.

We sincerely hope that, in helping make other people understand the risks associated with DVT and games, David Staniforth can find some much deserved comfort.

Source: BBC, Image via. Thanks to Andrew Eisen for the tip.


Comments

Re: UK Father Warns of the Deadly Combination of DVT and ...

again, notice how reading books and watching TV is not mentioned despite actually being in the same vein as videogames in this regard.

岩「…I can see why Hasselbeck's worried about fake guns killing fake people. afterall, she's a fake journalist on a fake news channel」

Re: UK Father Warns of the Deadly Combination of DVT and ...

I read this one this morning. Notice how this entry doesn't mention anything about the DVT. According to this, he just dies from playing games too long (and doesn't say how long either). It says he WOULD play for up to 12 hours, but didn't say if that's what killed him. 

http://blog.games.yahoo.com/blog/866-xbox-addict-dies-from-blood-clot/

Re: UK Father Warns of the Deadly Combination of DVT and ...

"David Staniforth adds the he has no problem with playing games but he does want to warn parents and other DVT sufferers of the serious risk it poses. He plans to create a website for just that purpose."

This is quite sensible, and something the BBC's coverage of the story managed to include.

The Sun, on the other hand, left this part out in order to spew their usual moronic XBOX EVIL invective. I've given up on complaining about The Sun being frothing lunatics (par for the course, really), but to make this guy also look like a frothing lunatic in support of their sensationalist agenda, when he's really just trying to raise awareness and educate people, is kind of reprehensible.

Re: UK Father Warns of the Deadly Combination of DVT and ...

The Sun is owned by News Corp, just like News of the World and Fox News. Being a bunch of disiningenous sensationlists is how the entire company operates.

But, yes, the lesson of "stand up now and then" is one that too many people, admittedly myself included, need to remember.

Re: UK Father Warns of the Deadly Combination of DVT and ...

The Sun's frontpage headline for this was literally:

"DEATH BY XBOX"

...

 
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IronPatriotBut hey, you're welcome.05/29/2015 - 5:23am
Andrew EisenEZK did say he didn't find any info on the appeals process. And if all he did was look at the ratings process part of the ESRB's website, he wouldn't have. That's where I would have looked too. But hey, thanks for being thorough and finding the info.05/29/2015 - 5:01am
Andrew EisenDude, again. I am NOT saying there is no appeals process. THERE OBVIOUSLY IS. All I am saying is that the appeals process is not described in the ratings process part of the ESRB's website.05/29/2015 - 4:59am
IronPatriotI googled appeal esrb.org and it is the first and third hits. Second is esrb talking about appeals for web publishers. Gamefaqs is fourth.05/29/2015 - 4:01am
IronPatriotZachary said he did not find any information about a formal appeals process. I did a simple search and found two places on the esrb site with the info. Just sayin.05/29/2015 - 3:57am
IronPatriotOn Google I get "1 Written Testimony of Patricia E. Vance President ... - ESRB" http://www.esrb.org/about/news/downloads/pvtestimony_6_14_06.pdf05/29/2015 - 3:55am
Andrew EisenNow, that post on GameFAQs was made four years ago. It appears the ESRB has since moved the appeals process stuff behind the publisher login on its website.05/29/2015 - 3:32am
Andrew EisenOh, third link on the Google search. Okay. That leads to a GameFAQs message board which quotes a section of the ESRB website that includes a description of the appeals process. But when you follow the link, that quote doesn't exist.05/29/2015 - 3:30am
Andrew EisenThird link down from what? Look, I'm not arguing the existance of an appeals process. There obviously is one. I was merely noting that it's odd that it isn't described on the website's ratings process section but it is on the mobile site.05/29/2015 - 3:25am
IronPatriotOK, so use the third link down, which describes the appeals process and is not on the mobile site"Publishers also have the ability to appeal an ESRB rating assignment to an Appeals Board, which is made up of publishers, retailers and other professionals."05/29/2015 - 2:47am
Andrew EisenRight, which links to the ESRB's mobile site. On the website (again, unless I'm overlooking it) the appeals process is locked behind the publisher login.05/29/2015 - 2:37am
IronPatriotHuh? Google "appeals esrb". It is the first link. Click it. No login requested.05/29/2015 - 2:31am
Andrew EisenInteresting. It's on the mobile site but unless I'm overlooking it, I don't see it under the Ratings Process on the web site. It is under the publishers section but you can't access it without a login.05/29/2015 - 2:13am
IronPatriot"Publishers also have the ability to appeal an ESRB rating assignment to an Appeals Board made up of publishers, retailers and other professionals. " Esrb05/29/2015 - 2:01am
IronPatriotZachary, did you look on the esrb site? The esrb appeals process pops up when you search "esrb appeals" http://m.esrb.org/faq_09.php05/29/2015 - 2:00am
Andrew EisenThe humor reminds me a lot of Axe Cop.05/29/2015 - 1:37am
WymorenceOh sweet god, Kung Fury is freaking awesome...05/28/2015 - 10:03pm
E. Zachary KnightWonder, I know you can revise content and resubmit it, but I can't findany information about a formal appeals process.05/28/2015 - 7:27pm
Wonderkarpever wonder if there's an appeals process for AO?05/28/2015 - 6:55pm
Matthew WilsonDanny and Andy play the first couple of levels of the upcoming Hatred http://www.gamespot.com/videos/hatred-gamespot-plays/2300-6425016/ imho it does not look like it should be AO.05/28/2015 - 5:57pm
 

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