Researchers Use Kinect, Doppler Radar to Help Elderly

September 7, 2011 -

Researchers at the University of Missouri and independent living community TigerPlace have been using motion-sensing technology to monitor test and monitor changes in elderly residents’ health for several years. Now, researchers have turned to video game technology combined with security systems as an effective way to detect the early onset of illness and to watch for fall risk in seniors. Marjorie Skubic, professor of electrical and computer engineering in the MU College of Engineering, is working with doctoral student Erik Stone to use Kinect to monitor behavior and routine changes in patients at TigerPlace.

“The Kinect uses infrared light to create a depth image that produces data in the form of a silhouette, instead of a video or photograph,” said Stone. “This alleviates many seniors’ concerns about privacy when traditional web camera-based monitoring systems are used.”

Another doctoral student, Liang Liu, is working with Mihail Popescu, assistant professor in the College of Engineering and the Department of Health Management and Informatics in the MU School of Medicine, to develop a fall detection system that uses Doppler radar to detect warning signs such as changes in walking, bending and other movements. Different human body parts create unique images that can be recognized by Doppler radar. Since falls combine a series of body part motions, the radar system can recognize a fall based on distinct “signatures.”

“Falls are especially dangerous for older adults and if they don’t get help immediately, the chances of serious injury or death are increased,” said Liu. “If emergency personnel are informed about a fall right away, it can significantly improve the outcome for the injured patient.”

Erik Stone, a doctoral student in the MU College of Engineering, recently won the best paper award for his research using the Kinect to detect fall risk in seniors. Stone’s study, “Evaluation of an Inexpensive Depth Camera for Passive In-Home Fall Risk Assessment,” won the best paper award at the Pervasive Health Conference, in Dublin, Ireland in May. Liu collaborated with GE Global Research and co-authors Tarik Yardibi and Paul Cuddihy.

Source: Health Canal


 
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Andrew EisenSmurfette is not subjective. If there's more than one female character, it's not Smurfette. Anyway, as with everything on the list, Smurfette is, in and of itself, not necessarily a bad thing.02/26/2015 - 8:32pm
Andrew EisenI think there's 5 women (out of 15, I think) but other than one being a bit more "hippy" than the others, they pretty much all have the same body type. Especially when compaired to the huge variety of male body types.02/26/2015 - 8:31pm
Wonderkarpso I dont see Smurfette as a bad thing. Unless like all your female characters are Smurfette. remember the Smurfs also had Sassette02/26/2015 - 8:29pm
E. Zachary KnightOne good example of the larger issues is one Anita used in the presentation, Blizzard's Overwatch game. There are a dozen men in the game with a dozen body types. But there are only 4 women with 2 body types, but 3 of them have the same one.02/26/2015 - 8:28pm
Wonderkarpthe smurfette thing is subjective to how many female characters you have. Take Sonic for example. You have Amy, who is obvious smurfette, but there's several other female characters now without that. Including the original animated seriescomics with Sally02/26/2015 - 8:28pm
E. Zachary KnightAE. Very true. I think that is where I was going, but it didn't come out right. Jack Harkness is sexy but not objectified. Whereas, a women would have to be objectified in order to be "sexy" in most games.02/26/2015 - 8:26pm
E. Zachary KnightAnd as Andrew pointed out, there is a big difference between a sexualized man, and an idealized man. But for some reason, there is no distinction between women in games. For the most part.02/26/2015 - 8:25pm
Andrew EisenI think one of the issues we run into repeatedly with these conversations is the confusion over "sexy" and "sexually objectified."02/26/2015 - 8:24pm
E. Zachary KnightYet, for some reason, in orde rto have a sexualized women, she must be wearing lingerie or a bikini. Can't women be sexual and still dress for the job at hand?02/26/2015 - 8:24pm
E. Zachary KnightThe problem I have with complaints of "sexualized men" is that men don't have to wear speedos to be sexualized. Captain Jack Harkness from Torchwood/Doctor Who, was one sexy man, but he spent 99% of his time in a WW2 soldier's trenchcoat.02/26/2015 - 8:23pm
Andrew EisenThat there's more to her character than her sexualization? Sure (depending on which depiction we're talking about). No one's claiming that there are zero examples of female characters beyond their sexualization.02/26/2015 - 8:22pm
Andrew EisenSexy? In some ways, sure. Sexualized? No.02/26/2015 - 8:21pm
WonderkarpI'll say the same thing about Catwoman that you said about Dante.02/26/2015 - 8:21pm
Andrew EisenWhich has nothing to do with sexualization.02/26/2015 - 8:20pm
Wonderkarpbig muscle mc shirtless? Ironic since the Spartan Army, in which he was a part of, is infamous for its Homosexuality02/26/2015 - 8:20pm
Andrew EisenNow Dante is definitely sexualized at times. Of course, there's more to his character than that.02/26/2015 - 8:19pm
Andrew EisenYou don't need to show a penis to see it bouncing around in some dude's britches. Kratos is not sexualized. He's idealized. There's a difference.02/26/2015 - 8:18pm
Wonderkarpmaybe not as blatent, you'll never see Dead or Alive Man Beach Vollyball. But its still there02/26/2015 - 8:18pm
Wonderkarpas a Healthy Bisexual Man, I've lusted over Dante from Devil May Cry as much as I've lusted over Catwoman. :P02/26/2015 - 8:17pm
Andrew EisenOf course men get sexualized, just with nowhere near the frequency of female characters.02/26/2015 - 8:17pm
 

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