Free Press Files Lawsuit Against New Net Neutrality Rules

Here's a news story we saw coming. It seems that some of the biggest net neutrality advocates in the country have decided to file a lawsuit against the rules ratified by the Federal Communications Commission. When the FCC finally issued the finished version of it network neutrality rules and announced they would go into effect at the end of November, lawsuits against the policy where waiting in the wings such as those that were thrown out earlier in the year by Verizon and Metro PCS. But it looks like the biggest group in the country has beat both of those companies to court: activist group Free Press has filed a lawsuit asking a federal appeals court to review the FCC's rules saying that they are too weak. The group strongly objects to the exemption for wireless companies, who are allowed to do all kinds of things to consumers including throttling and data caps.

Free Press says that the "decision to adopt one set of rules for broadband access via mobile platforms and a different set of rules for broadband access via fixed platforms" is "arbitrary and capricious" and violates the law.

In a statement to Ars Technica Free Press Policy Director Matt Wood said, "Our challenge will show that there is no evidence in the record to justify this arbitrary distinction between wired and wireless Internet access. The disparity that the FCC's rules create is unjust and unjustified. And it's especially problematic because of the increasing popularity of wireless, along with its increasing importance for younger demographics and diverse populations who rely on mobile devices as their primary means for getting online."

"Free Press will fight in court to make these rules stronger," he added.

No doubt, the FCC will face more legal challenges from the other side of the issue.

Source: Ars Technica

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