Focus Pocus Game Helps Children with ADHD

A new video game called Focus Pocus hopes to help children suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) by having them control their game characters with their brain waves through 12 mini-games. The game incorporates a real-time electroencephalography (commonly referred to as EEG, or defined as "recording electrical activity along the scalp") headset to measure and improve impulse control, memory, attention and relaxation in children. The game is the result of a joint effort by Silicon Valley-based brain-computer interface company NeuroSky, NeuroCog Solutions (Australia), and developer roll7 (United Kingdom).

According to developer NeuroCog Solutions, the game incorporates data from 15 years of research on ADHD. The wizard-themed game uses NeuroSky's brainwave-reading headset to assist children who have difficulty controlling memory and impulses and is geared towards children ages 7 to 13 years old. It focuses on learning fundamentals such as memory, impulse control, and the ability to concentrate.

In the game, players become apprentice wizards, working their way through 12 mini-games using the brain-computer interface (BCI) headset which exercises behavioral traits. For impulse control, the game lets players zap goblins in a forest; to test memory players must recall where a spell book was left in a library so they can cast spells on ghouls and goblins; and State control is trained through a mini-game where players must relax to turn a pig into a trumpet or concentrate to hurtle along on a broomstick.

The game also allows parents to log in daily and see how their child is doing with their exercises, and reward them for good behavior by unlocking features within the game. After 25 sessions, a report is generated that details performance and behavior change.

Focus Pocus bundled with the MindWave headset costs $249 and is currently only available for Windows.

For more information, check out this product sheet.

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  1. 0
    greevar says:

    What about adults with ADHD? I could use something like that! Nobody pays any attention to the adults with ADHD. It doesn't go away when you become an adult, I can personally vouch for that.

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