Teen Murderer Confess to Crime in World of Warcraft Chat

A teen murderer and rapist who confessed his crime in World of Warcraft to a friend (because he thought it would be safe to talk there) has been sentenced to life imprisonment with no possibility of parole for 10 years by a court in British Columbia. The 16-year-old, Kruse Wellwood, raped and murdered a classmate named Kim Proctor, who rejected his advances. He attempted to set up an alibi later by sending an instant message to the missing girl asking her why she never showed up to meet him. Investigators claimed to have gathered the equivalent of 1.4 billion sheets of paper evidence that made it fairly easy for them to unravel any defense he might have.

This included a printout of an instant message Kruse sent a friend after he and his accomplice raped and tortured Proctor and disposed of her body in a freezer located in the garage of his own house. While trying to put the body into the freezer an unnamed friend kept texting him. Later he replied to the friend with the message "Sorry, the freezer was jumping around."

He later confessed to murdering Proctor in a World of Warcraft chat session with a "girlfriend," as chronicled by Vanity Fair:

With Kim’s death consuming the town and the local news, Kruse became increasingly paranoid about leaving any more evidence online. But he couldn’t resist the urge to share his story with someone he trusted. He was afraid of using MSN, but he thought the chat logs in World of Warcraft were less likely to be saved. On March 23, five days after Kim’s murder, he told his gamer girlfriend in Halifax on MSN that he had something urgent to tell her, but that he wanted to do it over World of Warcraft chat instead. Once inside World of Warcraft, he confessed to the crime. Back on MSN, he sent her links to the news reports as backup. The girl was shocked, but she eventually replied in the way he no doubt expected. “I’ll always be here, no matter what you do,” she wrote.

Wellwood and his accomplice couldn't overcome the mountain of evidence that pointed to them as the ones who committed the crime. Ultimately they both would pled guilty to first-degree murder and indignity to human remains. Both were sentenced to life imprisonment with no possibility of parole for 10 years.

Update: We corrected the part of the story relating to "one billion sheets of paper evidence" for the sake of accuracy. We apologize for the error.

Source: Wired

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