FCC’s Net Neutrality Rules Officially in Effect

The Federal Communication Commission’s Net Neutrality rules are officially in effect. The new rules for ISP's in the United States became official on Sunday – nearly 11 months after the Federal Communications Commission voted to adopt them in December of last year. The Open Internet Order requires wireless and landline broadband providers to make certain disclosures to consumers about the way they manage traffic on the Internet from customers and comply with a number of other rules that are intended to preserve the openness of the Internet.

The FCC has detailed several methods of enforcing these rules, including options to file both informal and formal complaints with the agency against broadband providers that are allegedly violating the rules. The FCC also can commence investigations on its own if it feels the need. The FCC thinks that many complaints  can be resolved without its involvement.

While companies such as Time Warner Cable, Comcast, AT&T and Verizon (to name a few) have to comply with these rules, some have already taken the fight against net neutrality to U.S. Court of Appeals in the District of Columbia Circuit. Earlier this month efforts to nullify the law in the Senate failed to make it out of committee. Republican lawmakers see the FCC's new rules as an overreach by an agency that should leave the lawmaking to .. the lawmakers. Some politicians have even threatened to defund the effort, but so far have failed to do so.

Source: BillingWorld

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on RedditEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply