Sponsors of the OPEN Act Seek Input from the Public

December 8, 2011 -

As we mentioned last week Sen. Ron Wyden and Rep. Darrell Issa introduced an alternative bill to SOPA and Protect IP that would put the power of fighting so-called rogue web sites into the hands of the International Trade Commission. The OPEN Act (which stands for Online Protection and Enforcement of Digital Trade Act) focuses on interrupting the flow of funds to web sites that are proven to be trafficking in counterfeit goods or copyright materials.

The OPEN Act would create an Internet piracy panel or court within the International Trade Commission that would deal with complaints from the Justice Department and rights holders. The ITC would investigate complaints from copyright holders and determine if the Web sites in dispute are "dedicated to infringing activity." If they find this to be the case, they can issue a cease-and-desist order. The Justice Department would then be able to "bring an action for injunctive relief." The Internet piracy court would be composed of judges appointed by the ITC who would be required to have "a minimum of 7 years of legal experience," who could only be removed from that position for "good cause."

The Oregon Democrat and California Republican hope that their legislation will provide technology companies and critics of entertainment industry-backed SOPA bill an alternative that they can get behind. The House of Representatives committee vote on SOPA is expected next week. An aide to Wyden told CNET that the proposal is still a discussion draft phase and represents a work in progress.

One of the things the sponsors of this bill are doing to make the bill transparent is putting it up on the web site KeepTheWebOpen.com for the public to examine. Their hope is that the public will examine it closely and offer suggestions on how to make it better.

There are groups that oppose the OPEN Act such as the RIAA and the MPAA, who really wanted the ability to block allegedly infringing sites in their toolbox. SOPA and Protect IP gave them those tools and more. The sponsors of the OPEN Act see those bills as an extreme overreach that asks too much of service providers.

More details on the OPEN Act are expected sometime this week.

Source: CNET


Comments

Re: Sponsors of the OPEN Act Seek Input from the Public

"There are groups that oppose the OPEN Act such as the RIAA and the MPAA, who really wanted the ability to block allegedly infringing sites in their toolbox."

Don't worry RIAA, MPAA, and others.  You'll still have the ability to block infringing sites.  You'll just have to prove their doing it first.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: Sponsors of the OPEN Act Seek Input from the Public

Having to follow due process?  Being...REASONABLE?  What do you think we live in, a democracy?

Re: Sponsors of the OPEN Act Seek Input from the Public

Because you'd be wrong. Not that it matters, as the legal system is not directly dependent of the political one...

 
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Andrew EisenHey, remember Kung Fury? That short film that was funded via Kickstarter a few years ago? You can watch it now. I suggest you do. It's fun! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bS5P_LAqiVg05/28/2015 - 5:14pm
Goth_SkunkOriginally, yes. Some content was cut out in order to reduce its ratign from AO down to M, but PC users could work around that an unlock the full content by means of a patch. Which is what I did. :D05/28/2015 - 3:56pm
Andrew EisenKarp - Yes, for strong sexual content. Although the recent remaster contains all that content and was rated M.05/28/2015 - 3:54pm
Andrew EisenDepends on if you consider Hatred misrated. I haven't played the game or seen the ESRB's rating summary so I'm undecided.05/28/2015 - 3:53pm
WonderkarpDidnt Fahrenheit have an AO?05/28/2015 - 3:52pm
Matthew Wilson@AE that is why I said it seems more moral panic to me.05/28/2015 - 3:51pm
Andrew EisenMatthew - From what I've seen (just the trailers) the game is nowhere near as gory as many, many other games. But again, I'm guessing the AO rating comes from theme and tone rather than outright gore.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
Andrew EisenKarp - It didn't show penetration or nudity.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
WonderkarpI'd say Mortal Kombat X has more Gore and Violence than Hatred.05/28/2015 - 3:50pm
Matthew Wilsonwhat I mean by worse in this case its not more gory/violent than others.05/28/2015 - 3:48pm
WonderkarpI forget....did Hot Coffee actually show Penetration?05/28/2015 - 3:48pm
Andrew EisenKarp - The Skyrim mods are external mods. The Hot Coffee mod unlocked content on the disc. Big difference. Still, the content that was unlocked was still perfectly in line with an M rating in my opinion.05/28/2015 - 3:47pm
Andrew EisenThemes are factored into ratings, not just mechanics. Still waiting for ESRB's rating summary. Very curious to see what it has to say.05/28/2015 - 3:46pm
Matthew WilsonHatred is a top down shooter though, and isnt any worse than other top down shooters?05/28/2015 - 3:45pm
Wonderkarpyeah, San Andreases rerating was ridiculous. Why not rerate Skyrim with all its crazy sex mods out there? But yeah, ESRB is good as policing itself. 05/28/2015 - 3:45pm
Andrew EisenManhunt 2 and Hatred though? Eh, there's an argument to be made for the higher rating.05/28/2015 - 3:43pm
Andrew EisenRerating San Andreas was a mistake though. That seemed to be the result of kowtowing to public pressure.05/28/2015 - 3:42pm
Andrew EisenThere wasn't one. It's just a dumb rating.05/28/2015 - 3:42pm
WonderkarpI dont see Moral Panic with a racing game though05/28/2015 - 3:40pm
Matthew Wilson@AE when they tend to misrate games its normally because of moral panic surrounding it.05/28/2015 - 3:38pm
 

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