Gamers Against Bigotry Succumb to Hacker Attacks, Launch IndieGoGo Drive

July 25, 2012 -

Gamers Against Bigotry, a site that asked gamers to take a pledge promising not to use bigoted language while playing games online, announced that it has lost 1500 signatures due to repeated attacks from hackers. The site has faced some tough challenges from months of repeated attacks from hackers who have done everything from posting "grotesque images" on the website's signatures page, to making it impossible for new visitors to sign on to the pledge. The latest attack, according to the site owners, wiped the database holding all of its 1500 pledges.

"Unfortunately, the database of pledges was deleted by hackers, causing us to go from nearly 1500 pledges to ZERO (read more here)," reads a message marked urgent on the organization’s web site. "Attempts to restore the database have been met by repeated attacks, rendering the pledge component of the site essentially useless. We're not sure how the exploit was completed, so until we figure it out we ask that instead of signing the pledge (because the signatures will all be lost again) you donate to our indiegogo fundraiser to help us fight back."

"A group of narrow-minded, childish individuals are attempting to silence us, and so far doing a great job at it," the message continues. "Let your voice be heard."

The IndieGoGo page can be found here. It's doing quite well despite the attempts to make this initiative fail.

So what has some bad actors being so aggressive against the site and its organizers? Apparently they don't like the pledge on the site - even though it is completely voluntary.

The Pledge:

As a gamer, I realize I contribute to an incredibly diverse social network of gamers around the world, and that my actions have the ability to impact others. In effort to make a positive impact, and to create a community that is welcoming to all, I pledge to not use bigoted language while gaming, online and otherwise.

Bigoted language includes, but is not limited to, slurs based on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and disability.

Read more about the pledge, including what is and isn't included, and the overall purpose here.

Read why you shouldn't use the word "rape" casually here.

 

Source: Polygon


Comments

Re: Gamers Against Bigotry Succumb to Hacker Attacks, Launch ...

Sadly, the geek and tech communities often seem to have rather strong holdouts that react pretty violently to any suggestion that their behavior might be bad or that they might have to adjust their culture to bring in more people.

Just look at the mysogony that gets swung around any time you bring up any issue of women in games/tech/media.

Re: Gamers Against Bigotry Succumb to Hacker Attacks, Launch ...

I guess I just don't agree that certain language itself is inherently bigoted.  While it can be used in a bigoted way, tossing out a term in frustration would be ignorance at worst.

Re: Gamers Against Bigotry Succumb to Hacker Attacks, Launch ...

Not to condone the actions of hackers or those who use language in an abusive manner, but their approach seems a bit off.  Isn't a the prejudice, contempt, and intolerance for individuals who use specific words bigotry itself?

While I tend to agree with their goals making it easier to deal with those who preach hate, it seems that their methods are contradictory and not well developed.  I won't be signing their pledge as I believe that I can continue to be a positive and tolerant individual while still recognizing flexibility of language.

Re: Gamers Against Bigotry Succumb to Hacker Attacks, Launch ...

"Isn't a the prejudice, contempt, and intolerance for individuals who use specific words bigotry itself?"

Not at all. Not even slightly. Especially when reading the important part of the mission statement:

"I pledge to not use bigoted language while gaming, online and otherwise."

And this pledge is personal statement limited to those who choose to sign the petition, and isn't exactly enforceable anyway. It's simply a way for some to show solidarity in a message against poor behaviour in games and for those people to change the trend of this behaviour by not engaging in it themselves.

I don't agree with all their points, so I too wouldn't sign up to an idea I don't entirely side with. But that said, I conduct myself in (what I consider) a proper manner on the very rare instances I play online anyway. So I like to think I'm sending a similar message.

 
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