ECA Sends Letter in Support of Congressman Johnson's AppRights

August 16, 2012 -

The Entertainment Consumers Association (ECA) recently sent a letter to the office of Congressman Hank Johnson (D-Georgia) supporting the concept of his AppRights initiative and offering some advice on using a bottom-up approach to future internet legislation.

In case you are not aware of it, the AppRights initiative created by the Congressman seeks to create laws that protect the rights of U.S. citizens who use mobile applications while at the same time taking privacy and civil rights into consideration. It also encourages the public and interested parties to directly provide feedback to Congressman Johnson's office.

Several groups have provided feedback to the Congressmen including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Family One Safety Institute, and now the ECA. In a letter penned by ECA Vice President and General Counsel Jennifer Mercurio, the group applauded the Congressman for recognizing the failure of previous Internet-related legislation including SOPA and CISPA and pointed out that U.S. lawmakers generally ignore constituents who oppose legislation. Congressman Johnson agrees:

"We've all seen what happens when Congress tries to shove legislation down the public's throat without asking the internet what it thinks first," Johnson said. He opposed SOPA and compared the CISPA bill to "1984."

Mercurio also pointed out in a subsequent conversation with the organizers of AppRights that the Internet community is keen to keep control of its own activities online, without worrying about the government violating its rights.

"Each consumer should be able to control their own privacy," Mercurio said.

You can read the entire letter here, along with some commentary from Slade Bond, who serves as Technology Policy Fellow for the Office of Rep. Hank Johnson.

Source: AppRights

[Full Disclosure: GamePolitics is a publication of the ECA.]

 


Comments

Re: ECA Sends Letter in Support of Congressman Johnson's ...

No thanks, try again. Maybe something in the 2000's and not 1800's....


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

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