Aurora, Colorado Mayor Backpedals on Proposals for Video Game Bans, Sin Taxes

The mayor of Aurora, Colorado had hoped for more regulations on violent video games after the Aurora Theater shooting in July of 2012 (that saw 12 people dead and 70 injured), but it looks like he has been rebuffed by the City's Attorney, who pointed him to a widely known U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. EMA…

According to the Denver Post, Mayor Steve Hogan has avoided jumping into the debate on gun control currently going on in the state, but he decided that he might be interested in exploring the idea of a ban on mature rated violent video games. Mayor Hogan was also interested in looking into putting a "sin tax" on video games as well.

But both ideas received some pushback from a psychologist and from the City Attorney – an official from that office pointed out to the Mayor that placing higher taxes on a select form of entertainment or banning is unconstitutional.

Clinical psychologist and author of the book "Inside the Criminal Mind," Dr. Stanton E. Samenow told the Denver Post that there are many options to help stem gun violence, but video games are not the problem. He points out that there is no proven correlation between violent video games and an individual committing a real-world violent act.

"Many people who resort to heinous violent acts are already fascinated and enveloped by violence. … It's ludicrous to think a game just flips a switch and causes people to go overboard," Stanton told the Post. "Millions watch violent movies or play violent video games, and they don't go shoot or hurt people."

Mayor Hogan later told the Denver Post that his ideas related to regulating video games are apparently no longer solutions he's considering:

"I had hoped more regulation of the most violent games might be an answer. Obviously, it isn't," Hogan told the Denver Post via e-mail.

Source: Denver Post (Image via.)

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