Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

December 24, 2013 - GamePolitics Staff

Speaking to The Washington Post, former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden said that his "mission's already accomplished" after leaking NSA secrets that have caused a reassessment of U.S. surveillance policies. Snowden told the publication in a recent interview published online Monday night that he was satisfied with the results of his disclosure because it has enabled journalists to tell the story of the government's collection of bulk Internet and phone records.

"For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission's already accomplished," he said. "I already won."

"As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated," Snowden told the Post. "Because, remember, I didn't want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself."

President Barack Obama said on Friday that he would consider some changes to NSA's bulk collection of Americans' phone records to address the public's concern about privacy.

Snowden also said he does not feel that he is being disloyal to the U.S. or to his former employer.

"I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA," he said. "I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don't realize it."

When asked about the recent Snowden interview, White House spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said the following:

"Mr. Snowden faces felony charges here in the United States and should be returned to the U.S. as soon as possible, where he will be afforded due process and all the protections of our criminal justice system."

Source: Politico


Comments

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

I know my comments keep getting voted "down" when it comes to this topic, but I know I'm not alone in how I feel, and I'm content to be in the minority here.  There's plenty of reason to be skeptical of this guy.  And I'm not about to take at face value the word of some high school dropout self-appointed know-it-all who thinks he knows what's good for everybody like other people here have.

I'd personally like to have an hour with Snowden and give him a piece of my mind.  In fact, I challenge him right now to come on here and explain himself and engage us here.  If Jack Thompson could do it, I see no reason why he can't either.  If he can't stand by the courage of his convictions and come on here and address me and his other critics, then he really is a traitorous coward.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

So unless Snowden comes on a random site, which he may not be familiar with, and debates a bunch of nobodies in the grand scheme of things, you will continue to dismiss everything he has done as him being a coward. Yeah. That makes sense.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Your comments keep getting downvoted because you keep lobbing juvenille insults and needlessly inflammatory terms at Snowden like traitor and coward. Not because we disagree with you.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

I still do not like what he did, but I can agree that the NSA was wrong and needed to be exposed.  So I am still very conflicted with myself.

On the one hand, nations do need to keep some secrets. Developing new stelth planes, new technology, ect. BUT on the other hand, the government should NEVER spy on its own citizens, without a Legally Obtained  Search warrant.

I believe that Congress, House of Representatives, and the Governors should know everything. Yes, some would leak sensitive information, but at least then we can keep the Government somewhat honest.

I may be crazy, but I am not insane.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

This interview pretty much validates every impression I've had of Snowden.  Look, I can appreciate bringing to light some government activities that may be seen by some as on the shady side.  However, as I've said before, if you've been following the news post 9/11, none of this should have come as a surprise to anyone.  So I really honestly don't understand why so many people have been outraged by this...unless they haven't been paying attention.

To paraphrase the saying, I believe you can "hate the sinner, and not the sin" in this case.  And while he himself and others have said it's not about him, I think his personality and his motivations have a lot to do with what he did.  And his self-righteous attitude just rubs me the wrong way.

"For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission's already accomplished," he said. "I already won."

Really?  Who's being a smug little son of a bitch?

"Because, remember, I didn't want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself."

Really?  It's statements like this that make we ask, "Who does he think he is?"  Never mind, we'll get to that.  But this is typical: He pretends to be modest, but at the same time wants to take credit.  Like he wants to have it both ways.

Left out of this article was another quote when asked about Sen. Diane Feinstein...

“That whole question — who elected you? — inverts the model,” he said. “They elected me. The overseers."

Dianne Feinstein elected me when she asked softball questions” in committee hearings, he said. “Mike Rogers elected me when he kept these programs hidden. . . . The FISA court elected me when they decided to legislate from the bench on things that were far beyond the mandate of what that court was ever intended to do. The system failed comprehensively, and each level of oversight, each level of responsibility that should have addressed this, abdicated their responsibility.”

“It wasn’t that they put it on me as an individual — that I’m uniquely qualified, an angel descending from the heavens — as that they put it on someone, somewhere,” he said. “You have the capability, and you realize every other [person] sitting around the table has the same capability but they don’t do it. So somebody has to be the first.”

Narcissistic much?  I'm not a fan of Feinstein or Rogers, but it still wasn't up to him to do this.  And I don't believe him when he says he brought his concerns to his superiors.  There are no official records to confirm it.  Unless there's hard proof, I'll continue to believe he took it upon himself without first talking to anyone.

"If I defected at all," Snowden said, "I defected from the government to the public."

What does that even mean?!  Sounds like he's suffering from delusions of grandeur.

"I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA,” he said. “I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don’t realize it.”

Um, reality check, Eddie.  Are you still drawing a paycheck from the NSA?  No?  THEN YOU'RE NOT FUCKING WORKING FOR THEM!!!

Maybe he's not trying to bring down the NSA.  Maybe he dies want to improve it.  Fine.  But for right now, he's made it really goddamned difficult to do their job!

Here's some things people need to know about their "hero."  He cheated on an entrance test in order to get hired by the NSA.  At home, he worked at his computer with a hood covering both his head and the monitor so his girlfriend couldn't see what he was doing.  And before he made off with 1.7 million documents, he left a virus ins the computers he accessed.  I'm sorry, but "heroes" don't do that.

The guy is a self-righteous narcissist, with a worldview shaped by Ron Paul and one too many comic books, video games and Anime.  He's not a "hero" (at least he and I can agree on that much) and he certainly doesn't deserve amnesty.  Whether you think what he did was a good thing or not, he still broke the law!  I say get him back here to have him stand trial, sentence him to 25 years and never let him near a computer again.  And that's pretty magnanimous compared to other people I've heard, who just want him straight-up executed.

I reiterate, while I'm glad we can have this discussion about personal liberties, I don't approve of Edward Snowden or his actions, if that makes any sense.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

I was going to write a detailed rebuttal to all of the logical fallacies in your post, but then I came across this line: "He still broke the law!"

So the law is the law, huh? Frankly, that's such an incomprehensible statement I'm actually gleeful you brought it up. *cracks knuckles* Alright then, it's logic train time.

The inherent problem with "The law is the law" is that you're directly suggesting what's the law is what's right. If you don't immediately see the problem here, I pity your ignorance.

Let's take a look at what's been legal in the United States over the course of its 200-odd year history. Rosa Parks once violated the law by refusing to give her seat up to a white person on a segregated bus. But hey, the cops must have been right to arrest her, because the law's the law, right?

Japanese internment camps! The US freaking Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the internment camps as a military necessity. Again, does that make them right? According to you it does, since the law is the law. 

Speaking of the US Supreme Court, in the 1920s it was ruled that films were not protected speech! Was sweeping censorship of an entire medium okay because the law's the law?

Don't even make me bring up slavery. I guess all those slaves were wrong to try escaping through the Underground Railroad because hey, they were breaking the law!

Let's go back even further and talk about the reason the United States exists: Because people broke the law. The founding fathers, according to colonial law, broke so many laws that they were sure to be executed or at least imprisoned had the rebellion not failed. Yet why did they do it? Because, according to the Declaration of Independence that they themselves wrote, it was their duty in the face of bad law.

This of course, all assumes that what the NSA is doing is legal, which has been sharply contested. The original author of the Patriot Act has gone on record as saying that this was not the intent of the act and that this is using a very liberal interpretation. Oh yeah, and there was the fact that it's already ruled to be likely unconstitutional.

This also assumes that Edward Snowden is charged appropriately, which he isn't. It's no secret that the Obama administration has been shamelessly abusing the Espionage Act, which is outdated and meant to target spies. Edward Snowden, simply put, is not a spy, and treating him as one only buys into the smear campaign Obama is running against him because the US government's dirty laundry was exposed.

But none of that matters, right? In your black and white world, the law is the law. Context be damned.

 

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

I never said "The law is the law."  As much as you may misinterpret/distort what I said, I still stand by my words.  And many political analysts and historians will back me up when I say that we - America - are a nation of laws.  Regardless of what you may think, Snowden violated some pretty basic laws in doing what he did, including the Espionage Act of 1917, which I mentioned in another reply.

As I have tried to point out, there were other, more legitimate and legal ways he could have gone about doing what he did.  But instead he chose not to pursue those avenues, and instead took it upon himself to decide what was "right" or "wrong."  And that's not how it should be done.

Also, by conflating Snowden's actions and comparing it to obvious human rights abuses like the Interment Camps, Civil Rights and slavery are both disingenuous and a Straw Man argument.  In those cases, those were all clear examples of oppression.  But as you've stated with what the NSA is doing, that's not as clear-cut.  Contrary to popular belief, there is NO evidence - zero, nada, zilch - that the NSA is actively looking at the content of your emails or listening to your phone conversations.  At most, they are sort of playing a "connect the dots" with phone calls made outside the U.S., flagging any that might look suspicious.  That's about it.

Also, the NSA has been getting this call data information legally from phone companies; something local law enforcement has been doing for decades.  It's nothing new.

Now sure, is there a concern that this could be a slippery slope and that this could someday be abused?  Sure.  And it's good that we're having this discussion now before it gets to that point so it can be nipped in the bud.  But to call this a major crime against human rights on the order of internment camps, segregation and slavery is REALLY stretching it.

As I've said before, our country is a nation of laws.  And yes, some of them have been bad or questionable.  But the beauty is if they are recognized as such, then they can be repealed or struck down.  The problem is, Snowden has taken it upon himself to determine if these laws are wrong, and that's not up to him.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

"I never said "The law is the law."  As much as you may misinterpret/distort what I said, I still stand by my words.

You said that Snowden broke the law as a justification for why what he did was wrong. You're using the letter of the law as the excuse itself. I'm not distorting anything; you directly inferred it.

We're a nation based on a Constitution because the founding fathers specifically knew that unconstitutional laws could be passed (and hell, the colonial era was guilty of this too). Even if you accept the argument that this spying is lawful - which you shouldn't - does that make it constitution, according to the Fourth Amendment?

"Regardless of what you may think, Snowden violated some pretty basic laws in doing what he did, including the Espionage Act of 1917, which I mentioned in another reply."

See Zachary's post more information, and since you evidently skimmed over what I said, the Espionage Act is meant to target spies. The modus operandi of spies is to remain...you know, concealed. So why would Edward Snowden go public with his revelations?

More importantly, spying infers that he specifically meant to give this information to another county, which has been debunked. All of his leaks have been left with the Guardian and Glenn Greenwald, unless you have some proof, which I'd love to hear.

"As I have tried to point out, there were other, more legitimate and legal ways he could have gone about doing what he did.  But instead he chose not to pursue those avenues, and instead took it upon himself to decide what was "right" or "wrong."  And that's not how it should be done."

For the tenth time, no, Snowden did not have any other channels. Specifically because the US government closed them off. 

If Snowden had concerns that one of his co-workers was abusing the NSA’s surveillance authority to, for example, collect data on a former girlfriend or blackmail a member of Congress, he could have reported his concerns to a supervisor, and it’s likely that action would have been taken.

Contrary to what the president seems to think, Snowden wasn’t concerned that the NSA was “improperly” collecting information on hundreds of millions of Americans, without them knowing, and having lied about it multiple times. How exactly does the president think Snowden should have raised that concern?

When the guy in charge appears to be a significant part of the problem, sometimes the only way to resolve the problem is to let his boss know what’s going on. And when the guy in charge is the president of the United States, that means letting the American people know what he’s been up to. 

Snowden’s former employer, Booz Allen, which requires employees to report “all suspected violations of the law” and cautions them to “take care to not report a violation to someone that they believe is involved in the matter.”

What about Congress? This is the same Congress where the House and Senate intelligence committees were already aware of the NSA’s activities. And if the outraged reactions of toher Congress representatives are any indication, they've been hamstrung to do anything.

So nearly everyone Edward Snowden worked for—up to and including the president of the United States—was involved in the matter. So, again, whom exactly should he have gone to with his concerns?

"Also, by conflating Snowden's actions and comparing it to obvious human rights abuses like the Interment Camps, Civil Rights and slavery are both disingenuous and a Straw Man argument.  In those cases, those were all clear examples of oppression.  But as you've stated with what the NSA is doing, that's not as clear-cut.  Contrary to popular belief, there is NO evidence - zero, nada, zilch - that the NSA is actively looking at the content of your emails or listening to your phone conversations.  At most, they are sort of playing a "connect the dots" with phone calls made outside the U.S., flagging any that might look suspicious.  That's about it."

So you are actually telling me - without wearing a clown hat - that the issue of secretive mass spying isn't a human rights violation or even an issue?

Wow.

Do you even know what a straw man argument is? You're shifting this argument to the severity of abuse rather than highlighting the logical fallacy behind "the law is the law". If anyone is setting up a straw man argument here, it's you?

You may not care for Edward Snowden, but the fact that you think he's a smug asshole (for whatever reason) is not evidence of him being a spy or that he did this to be self serving, and you would sound much smarter saying you don't like him rather than resorting to juvenille insults and flat out lies, because that's barely what Mike Rogers or Dianne Feinstein are capable of.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

No.  I don't like him.  At all.  And that's why I can't really fully get behind what he did, because from where I'm standing, he's looking like a self-righteous jerk, and that colors my perception of his motivations for doing what he did.  He and others love to say, "It's not about him," to which I say, "Yeah.  It kinda is."  Maybe I'm too cynical, but in my experience no one does anything that selfless unless they're incredibly, deluded and naive.  People usually do things that audacious if they know there's something in it for them.  And it makes more sense to think he's just doing it for attention and self-aggrandizement.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Yeah, because going public has done so much for Snowden. He's been declared a cowardly traitor by people like you, been charged under an intentionally misapplied interpretation of the law, had calls for his execution and hanging, been smeared as a hacker and a spy, and has now had to seek asylum in a foreign country, essentially making him an exile.

What he did was incredibly brave, specifically knowing he would have to deal with the babyish attitude of the Obama administration because its ego received a boo boo.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Maybe he was being brave.  But if I were him, pulling down over $100,000.00 a year, had a nice house in Hawaii and a pole-dancing girlfriend, I wouldn't be so quick to question my job.  I know that sounds bad, but it sounds to me like everything came easy for him being as smart as he is, and not all of us are that fortunate.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Having just said that, you're actually wondering why your comments keep getting downvoted?

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

So now he is wrong because he is smart? Wow. You are really getting petty here.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

No one likes a know-it-all, Zach.  And basically every comment from him I see in every interview, is basically him saying, "I'm smarter than all of you, and I know it."  And a lot of people find that attitude insufferable.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Yes. People don't like smug jerks. But I think we may being having a difference of understanding or interpretation of what Snowden is saying, or what his attitude conveys. As I understand his statements is that he is saying, I have more information than most Americans and I am sharing it. I think that is a virtue. 

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

All your talk about him being a narcissist is just your opinion, And so what if he is? You just don't like him so you read way to much in to what he said to validate your hate.

"if you've been following the news post 9/11, none of this should have come as a surprise to anyone"

True but we had no idea to what extent the NSA was doing this. Hell the people who allowed this were even lied to.

"he still broke the law!"

So? Some laws are meant to be broke. Hell this country was built on it. The revolutionary war was an act of treason. Its the reason we are supposed to protect whistleblowers in this county.


"I say get him back here to have him stand trial, sentence him to 25 years and never let him near a computer again"

Why have him stand trial? You have clearly decided hes guilty and of what sentence he should get.


"other people I've heard, who just want him straight-up executed"

And those people are stupid. Those people would have most likely called for the execution of the signers of the declaration of independence since that made them traitors.

"I'm glad we can have this discussion about personal liberties, I don't approve of Edward Snowden or his actions, if that makes any sense"

No it makes no sense since hes the reason we are having this discussion.

 

 

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

All your talk about him being a narcissist is just your opinion, And so what if he is? You just don't like him so you read way to much in to what he said to validate your hate.

But he is a paranoid, arrogant narcisscist!  And I'm not reading that much into it.  Just a casual read of his statements makes it pretty clear to anyone.  You may appreciate what he did, but his motives were entirely self-serving, contrary to what he may have you believe.

True but we had no idea to what extent the NSA was doing this. Hell the people who allowed this were even lied to.

Really?  It shouldn't have been a huge leap to imagine what the NSA would have been capable of.  Again, if you followed history or had any idea of how agencies like the NSA operate, you shouldn't have been so surprised.

So? Some laws are meant to be broke. Hell this country was built on it. The revolutionary war was an act of treason. Its the reason we are supposed to protect whistleblowers in this county.

There is a saying: "History is written by the winners."  If the American Revolution failed, our history books would have read very differently, and the Founding Fathers indeed would have been labled as traitors rather than heroes.  It just so happens it worked out; they were successful, and now we view them as heroes.  But you sure as hell can bet that at the time, they weren't seen that way.

The jury is still out on Snowden.  If you ask me, it's too soon to tell.  History will not determine for a long time whether he was ultimately wrong or right.  But at the moment, he's not looking much like what we traditionally think of as a hero right now.  He's just looking like a smug douchebag.

Why have him stand trial? You have clearly decided hes guilty and of what sentence he should get.

And a lot of other people have decided he should automatically be hailed a hero and given a ticker-tape parade!  You don't think that's even more ridiculous?  At least have him stand trial and let a a Federal judge and jury of his peers decide his fate.  I think that's pretty fair compared to what others on both sides have been saying should be done with him.

Also, Snowden is not a "whistleblower."  All he did really was show us how intelligence sausage gets made, and in so doing, has abetted our enemies in violation of the Espionage Act of 1917.  And his actions revealed nothing particularly damning, inspiring or visionary.

And those people are stupid. Those people would have most likely called for the execution of the signers of the declaration of independence since that made them traitors.

Again, history is written by the winners.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

"Abetted our enemies"

I guess that's why General Keith Alexander and James Clapper have both admitted that they exaggerated the damage done by Snowden and that they aren't concerned with terrorists changing their methods of operations or communications after the leaks?

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

But you should agree with Alexander that Snowden should not get amnesty, right?  As Alexander said on 60 Minutes, it's like having a terrorist kidnap 50 people, shoot 10, then say, "If you give me amnesty, I'll let the other 40 go."  Like it or not, the government can't simply excuse what he did.  He's got to be made to face the consequences.  Otherwise we'll give other like him encouragement to do the same thing he did, knowing they can strike the same deal.  We can't have that happen.

So, fair or not, Snowden has to be punished and made an example of, if for no other reason than to let others know that there are consequences.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Alexander said on 60 Minutes, it's like having a terrorist kidnap 50 people, shoot 10, then say, "If you give me amnesty, I'll let the other 40 go."

You do realize that Alexander is a blowhard and that what Snowden did and what Alexander says are not at all the same thing. No one was harmed by Snowden's actions. No one died. No one was hurt. What Snowden did has been a huge net positive for this nation, whether the blowhards in power want to recognize that or not. 

And if you are going to use that 60 Minutes blow job for the NSA as evidence of Snowden's wrong doing, you are a bigger fool than I thought.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Oh, you had to bring up 60 Minutes. Alright then.

That episode was so riddled with conflicts of interest that it's almost comical. The reporting was conducted by John Miller, a former intelligence community official (who worked for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which oversees the NSA. What a coincidence!) in a spokesperson role and among other roles of the intelligence community. He also le left out that he's about to be hired in an intelligence role for the NYPD. Miller is, clearly, an intelligence industry spokesperson at heart, pretending to be a journalist here. So relying on that to make your point is laughable.

And that comparison Alexander made is not appropriate at all. It's actually analogous to someone calling out bad behavior and then saying "if you don't prosecute me for bogus reasons, I can help you fix and stop your bad behavior." That seems like a good thing.

The most insulting part was Alexander saying people should be "held accountable for their actions".

Oh, really?

Actions like violations of the 4th Amendment of the Constitution? Lying to the American public? Mass surveillance on Americans and foreigners? Actions like purposely putting security holes in technology standards making us all less safe? Actions like "accidentally" spying on people the NSA is not allowed to spy on?

Yes, I absolutely do believe Snowden should be granted amnesty. With both a federal judge and the White House's own task force both basically saying that the current NSA surveillance efforts go way too far, it seems time to admit that what Ed Snowden did was an incredible service to the American public (not to mention the rest of the world). The fact that the US is still trying to charge him under the Espionage Act is a miscarriage of justice.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

In reply to both your comments, I'd sooner go by the word of 60 Minutes, whose track record for journalistic integrity goes back decades, than the say-so of someone like Snowden.  Why should I believe anything he has to say?  Nothing that he's leaked so far that I've heard is anything I find particularly damning.  And what about the other documents he has?  Have you seen them?  I haven't.  So how can anyone be sure he's telling the absolute truth?  I know you can just as easily say that about the government.  But Snowden seems to be making things out to be more incriminating than they actually are.  And if you don't think we've never spied on our allies before or that our government hasn't lied to us before or anything else you mentioned, I've got a bridge I want to sell you.

And I will vehemently disagree with you on granting amnesty to Snowden.  No way he should get it.  Not in light of what he did, whether you agree with it or not.

While I have a healthy questioning of authority, I still do have respect for it.  And like I said, I'm more inclined to go with a source I trust more than one I don't.  And if you think that makes me a fool, well, I don't know what to say to that.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

You may trust the word of 60 Minutes, but many many journalists with jsut as much credibility, or a whole lot more credibility than 60 Minutes now, have debunked that entire segment, calling into question the integrity of the entire 60 Minutes operators.

And I don't think anyone is denying that the US government has spied on allies or lied before. That is a given truth. What we are saying is that when such things happen and they exceed the Constitutional authority of our government, those actions and those who commit them need to be outed and ousted. That cannot happen without the aid of whistleblowers like Snowden.

When telling the truth is a criminal offense, then we are ruled by tyrants.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Which journalists or journalistic outfits exactly have criticized the 60 Minutes piece?  I haven't heard anything about that since it aired.  I'd like some links, please.

Your statement about being ruled by tyrants only applies if you think every single branch of our government has failed.  And I know a lot of Libertarians like you love to think our Federal government system as it is is FUBAR and would like nothing more than to sweep it all away so your savior Ron Paul and son can come riding to the rescue with their Randian-influenced policies.  Well, it ain't gonna happen.  Not in this lifetime anyway.  You may not like Obama, but he and his administration are the furthest thing from a tyrant.  And I for one still have some faith left in our institutions and that they can still be fixed.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Here is a couple of general debunkings:

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131223/01415225672/conflict-ridden-cbs-60-minutes-journalist-defends-his-nsa-propaganda-piece-insulting-all-his-critics.shtml

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131216/12580425582/cbs-airs-nsa-propaganda-informercial-masquerading-as-hard-hitting-60-minutes-journalism-reporter-with-massive-conflict-interest.shtml

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131223/12414525675/60-minutes-continues-its-track-record-letting-us-national-security-officials-lie-camera-without-challenge.shtml

That third one lists a number of reporters who criticized the 60 Minutes segment icluding a link to this:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/16/nsa-surveillance-60-minutes-cbs-facts

And another from one of those:

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/no-one-outside-nsa-seems-particularly-happy-60-minutes-nsa-piece/

Of course none of those resources conform to your preconceived notions about the whole issue, so you may not get much out of it.

And I recommend that you do not automatically dismiss the links to Techdirt as every single one of their complaints is cited with links to other sites.

Oh. And this isn't the first time 60 Minutes has given some organization a blow job. They also gave the MPAA a similar segment.

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20091101/1818186751.shtml

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

Ok.  I did find some of those pretty enlightening.  One though you didn't link to was this Forbes article about Snowden.

An NSA Coworker Remembers the Real Edward Snowden: "A Genius Among Geniuses"

In counterpoint, though, I'd like to offer these two:  Another one from Forbes by Carrie Sheffield:

Edward Snowden Is Not 'Person of the Year'

And this earlier one by Jeffrey Toobin:

Edward Snowden is no Hero

But on further thought, I find myself agreeing most with what was said by his former co-worker at the end of that first article: "I don’t agree with his methods, but I understand why he did it.”

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

I didn't link to anything about Snowden because you wanted links about 60 Minutes. But that is beside the point. I will take a look at those.

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

The Espionage Act requires that the "spy" directly aid an enemy. Snowden has not given anything directly to any foreign government or power. He has revealed his "stolen" documents to the media. If you are claiming that the media is the enemy, you are pretty clearly confused. 

So if he is charged under the Espionage Act, then that would be a severe injustice. 

Re: Edward Snowden: 'The Mission's Already Accomplished'

There's nothing I can say to your comment, aside from the fact that it was reasonable and mature, and you should be proud that you're looking at this incident in such a fashion. You get the point, pure and simple.

 
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