Kickstarter: No Plans on Going Public or Adding Support for Equity-Based Investing

May 5, 2014 - GamePolitics Staff

Kickstarter co-founder and current CEO Yancey Strickler said that Kickstarter has no plans to become a publicly traded company or to offer equity-based offerings in its crowd funding ecosystem. Speaking with TechCrunch’s John Biggs at the TechCrunch Disrupt New York event, Strickler shot down the idea of adding equity-based crowdfunding features into its popular crowd-funding platform.

"We’re planning on sitting that one out," said Strickler when asked whether Kickstarter would be extending its platform to allow projects to offer their backers equity in exchange for financial support, rather than just rewards.

"I think that what we really like about Kickstarter is that projects are funded just because people think they’re cool. Because they’re excited about them. Because of that you get all sorts of really weird, crazy things that get funded, and it’s just an incredibly diverse universe of people making things just because they’re excited about them," added Strickler.

He also shot down the idea of becoming a publicly traded company:

"If you look at the way the culture industry or investment models work, someone gives you money and hopes that they will make money themselves — and obviously that is the point of investment but I think art works by different rules, creative things work by different rules. If you look at everything through that prism the concept of what becomes possible becomes much, much smaller," he said.

"I think there are things that are more important than money. I think the community is something that our hearts instinctively look for, and so for me I feel a great resolve and a real privilege to be able to devote my life to," added Strickler.

Strickler has a lot more to say in his conversation with TechCrunch about board games, investing, and video games. You can check out the entire conversation here.

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Re: Kickstarter: No Plans on Going Public or Adding Support ...

That is a shame, but not too surprising.  Kickstarter has in part done so well because it kept its scope rather narrow, though if other make it work I could see them trying it out eventually.

Hrm, I wonder what the legality of having stock certificates at various reward levels would be. (edited) ah, looked into it.  quite illegal.  poor people are not allowed to access such things 'for their own good'.

 
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