Research: ‘Polite’ Female and ‘Rude’ Male Gamers Accepted Most in Online Games

A study of online Call of Duty players found that women who sent out friend requests were more likely to be accepted if they behaved in polite and positive manner during play. Those women who talked trash during matches were less likely to have a friend request accepted. On the flip side, males who talked trash during online play sessions were more likely to have a friend request accepted than those who were polite or remained quiet during a match.

The data comes from a field experiment where researchers used gender specific names to play Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 online on PlayStation 3. Researchers played some of these gender-named accounts in both aggressive and non-aggressive ways.

The study is part of the Computers in Human Behavior series of research papers.

"We found support for the hypothesis that, in general, women would gain more compliance with friend requests than men," noted the research report. "We also found support for the hypothesis that women making positive utterances would gain more compliance with friend requests than women making negative utterances, whereas men making negative utterances would gain more compliance with friend requests than men making positive utterances.

"Sex role stereotyping by players in first-person shooter games and other online gaming environments may encourage a social environment that marginalizes and alienates female players. The anonymity of online games may engender endorsement of group-consistent attitudes and amplification of social stereotyping."

Source: Gamasutra by way of Polygon

"Teens playing videogames," photo © 2013, 2014, Shutterstock. Used under license.

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