Over One Million Americans Submit Comments to FCC About Net Neutrality Changes

July 18, 2014 - GamePolitics Staff

While it will come as no surprise to anyone paying attention to proposed changes to the 2010 Open Internet Order (Net Neutrality rules) put forth by chairman Tom Wheeler, the FCC has confirmed that over one million people submitted comments during the public comment period so far.

The deadline to submit comments ends tonight at Midnight.

According to a tweet from Gigi Sohn, Special Counsel for External Affairs, Office of the Chairman, more than 1 million people have now submitted comments on net neutrality.

A subsequent tweet gave an exact number:

This comes as no shock to rights group Progressive Change Campaign Committee, who run the website No Slow Lane.

"The extraordinary outcry from over 1 million Americans, forcing the FCC to extend its deadline to handle the deluge, makes it clear: The American public demands that the FCC side with them on Net Neutrality, not big telecom companies like Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, and Time Warner," said Keith Rouda, PCCC organizer. "Americans understand that allowing an Internet fast lane to be created for big corporations, leaving slow lanes for everyone else, will destroy innovation on the Internet. The FCC should listen to the American public, at NoSlowLane.com and across the Internet, and reclassify the Internet as a public utility like water -- equally accessible to all."

The million dollar question is: will the FCC listen to the million+ every day Americans who took the time to comment or will it side with broadband providers by allowing paid prioritization?


Comments

Re: Over One Million Americans Submit Comments to FCC About ...

This particular FCC proposal is the most-commented on proposal to date by a ridiculously massive margin.  Most proposals only receive a half-dozen public comments on average.  In my case, I was completely unable to comment due to the FCC servers being down/unavailable whenever I attempted to comment so my comment never made it in.  However, it shouldn't come as a surprise that the servers were completely unprepared to handle 1 million+ comments and therefore the comments that are there are a small fraction of the total comments that would have been made.

Even if the FCC doesn't listen, this is still a massive win for various awareness organizations.  Getting Internet-savvy folks involved in local and federal government on the decision-making level is something that local and federal governments have been trying to do for ages and generally failed miserably at.

- Left4Dead Why are zombies always eating brains? I want to see zombies that eat toes for a living. Undead-related pun intended.
 
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