Chinese Game Pits Vendors Against Authorities

October 26, 2010 -

The tense, often bloody relationship between Chinese law enforcement and street vendors has led to the creation of a free downloadable game inspired by that confrontational environment.

Hawker War City Management appears to be the name of the title, and, according to a piece on the game on TheWorld.org website, the downloadable title features plenty of social commentary, designed to highlight the plight of common citizens “left outside in the cold as China’s economy grows.”

Correspondent Mary Kay Magistad offered this description of the game:

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Huge Piracy Ring Smashed in Taiwan

October 21, 2010 -

A seven-month long investigation culminated in members of Taiwan’s Intellectual Property Rights Police Team arresting four individuals believed to be responsible for a hefty videogame piracy ring operating in Taiwan and China.

The investigation resulted in the September 27 raid of a warehouse in Sanchong City, Taiwan, where 140,000 pirated game discs for the PlayStation 2, Wii and Xbox were discovered, reports Focus Taiwan. The value of the seizure was estimated to be over $8 million U.S.

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Research: Chinese Gamers Sick of MMOs

October 5, 2010 -

Chinese gamers are apparently getting sick of the thousands of me-too MMORPGs on the market and are shifting towards more casual online offerings. That is what research firm and Chinese market analyst Niko Partners says, anyway. A new report from the firm says that gamers in the region are shifting away from hardcore MMOs in favor of casual games. This shift is driven by the monotony of the games on offer in China.

"We believe that the Chinese market has taken up SNS (social networking site) gaming in earnest, and that the hard-core gamers have shifted their preferences to include these games alongside the casual gamers who naturally appreciate them, " Niko Partners' Lisa Cosmas Hanson told GamesIndustry.biz.

"The hardcore gamers are growing weary of the monotony of themes in the Chinese MMORPGs, and they want to extend their social interactions to games that attract a more diverse user base. People want to play games that enable them to have something to bond over when chatting with schoolmates or colleagues at the water cooler. "

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GDC China 2010 Registration Opens

September 15, 2010 -

Registration is now open for the 2010 Game Developers Conference China, should you want to make the trek to China on December 5. Now in its 3rd year, GDC China offers game developers in China various panels, and lectures from local talent and international talent.

Bill Roper from Cryptic Studios will deliver this year's keynote address, speaking out about his time working for Blizzard Entertainment and Flagship Studios. The event will also feature the second annual Independent Games Festival China, highlighting the best games from the region's independent game development community. The three-day event will take place December 5-7, 2010 at Shanghai International Convention Center in Shanghai, China.

GDC China offers a 25 percent discount is available on registrations before November 5. Online registration ends on November 30. For more information about the event, check out www.gdcchina.com.


China’s Shanda Buys Korean Developer, Links up with CNTV

September 9, 2010 -

Chinese online game operator and developer Shanda Games is apparently enjoying the fruits of operating in a near recession proof industry, as it has snatched up a Korean developer and entered into an alliance with China Network Television (CNTV).

Shanda announced its intention to gobble up Eyedentity Games for around $95 million U.S. Eyedentity was described as “a private developer of online games with over 100 game developers.” Its latest game, Dragon’s Nest, was released around the world and  billed as being “one of the most successful new online games in China this year.”

Shanda said that the deal would strengthen its international presence.

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MS Exec: Kinect Could Help 360 Get to Market in China

September 1, 2010 -

As Microsoft continues to try and get its Xbox 360 to market in China, an executive for the company outlined why Kinect may be a valuable asset in its push and how MS plans to combat piracy in the Asian country.

Simon Leung (pictured), Microsoft Corporate Vice President, Chairman and CEO for the Greater China region, speaking to the Wall Street Journal, first noted why China is such an attractive region, if it wasn’t already apparent, stating that China would soon be the world’s largest PC market, while it's already tops in the mobile phone and broadband categories.

Leung indicated that China is becoming a growing adopter of cloud computing, which could help protect Microsoft, as Leung stated, “… you cannot pirate a cloud application.”

Asked about selling consoles in China, Leung responded:

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Lenovo Planning Console for non-Hardcore Chinese Gamers

August 27, 2010 -

Computer maker Lenovo has established a new company as part of a push to make its own videogame console.

Beijing eedoo Technology Ltd. will oversee development of an internally developed Lenovo console named eBox, reports the Wall Street Journal. Planned for release in China by the end of this year, the eBox will be “compatible” with high-definition televisions and allow users to download content from the Internet. Users will be able to interact with the device by using a camera.

eedoo plans to launch the console in China first, since “regulations of game consoles are murky and rampant piracy poses a big challenge for console game sales.”

China Daily, which features a pair of concept drawings of the product, reports that the eedoo team consists of some 40 software engineers. Pricing for the eBox is expected to be “slightly lower” than that of the Xbox 360.

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Chinese Gamers to Feel Lich King Wrath at Month’s End

August 24, 2010 -

Blizzard and Chinese game operator Net Ease will officially launch the World of Warcraft expansion Wrath of the Lich King just a few short weeks after it was finally approved in the Asian country.

According to a joint press release from Blizzard and Net Ease, the expansion will go live in mainland China on August 31, almost two years after it was launched (November 2008) in Europe and North America.

Net Ease CEO William Ding stated, “We are fully prepared on all fronts to provide great service and support to all of the new and returning players throughout China, and we look forward to welcoming them to Northrend.”

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Youth Study: Games Good for Mental Health, Bad for Academics

August 23, 2010 -

A study of 626 Honk Kong Chinese students, who averaged about 10 years old, indicated that while playing massively multiplayer online games appears to contribute to a kid’s psychological well-being, overall time spent playing computer games had a negative correlation with their academic performance.

Dr. Angel Nga-man Leung and Prof. Catherine McBride (pictured) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong's Department of Psychology carried out the study (PDF), which indicated that students spent 67 minutes per day, on average, playing MMOs, 44 minutes on solitary computer games, 44 minutes per day using handheld games and 31 minutes a day playing home video consoles. In gender specific results, boys played more minutes per day in each category when compared to their female counterparts.

The students were also asked to compare their real-life friends against friends from their online games. The results caused the researchers to declare:

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Myopia Rises in Honk Kong Youth, Games Share Blame

August 23, 2010 -

A study undertaken by researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong indicates that near-sightedness (myopia) has increased significantly over a 10-year period in the youth of that region, and handheld videogames were given most of the blame.

The study was actually carried out between 2006 and 2007 and involved over 800 kids between the ages of two and six. Results were then compared to a similar study undertaken in 1996. It was reported that the number of cases of near-sightedness rose from 157 kids to 222, and that the number of children wearing glasses rose from 2.3 percent in the older study to 6.3 percent in the newer one.

Dennis Lam Shun-chiu, Chairman of the school’s Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences pinned the blame on “playing video games - especially in moving vehicles - and watching television or using a computer for a long time and sitting too close to screens…” according to The Standard.

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Foxconn Implements Work-Friendly Changes

August 18, 2010 -

It was a different scene today at the Shenzhen, China-based Foxconn plant, which employs over 300,000 workers who assemble everything from iPhones to video game accessories. Today Foxconn held a rally designed to promote living and loving life and to generally boost the morale of workers - who only a few months ago were as unhappy as a worker can be in a plant that expects the average employee to work 80 hours of overtime a week.

Just a few months ago morale was so low that more than a dozen employees committed suicide, prompting the company to install safety nets on the top of its buildings. But more importantly, it made the company face the reality that productivity has to be balanced with the well being of its employees.

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Skulls Removed, Blood Changed for Chinese Lich King

August 17, 2010 -

While the Chinese Ministry of Culture finally gave the go-ahead for the not-too-distant release of the World of Warcraft expansion Wrath of the Lich King, a taste of some changes Blizzard had to make to models in the game are detailed on a website dedicated to Chinese gaming.

A handful of images appearing on ChinaGame.178.com show the removal of mostly skulls and bones from models in the approved version. Another image also appears to indicate that sprites used to animate blood loss and/or splattering were changed from red to green.

In the images below, original models are on the left while the purported Chinese-approved modifications are on the right.

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China: Lich King Approved, EA Mulling Investment?

August 10, 2010 -

China’s Ministry of Culture has finally given its approval (translated) to the World of Warcraft expansion Wrath of the Lich King, almost two full years after it was released in other parts of the world.

A PC World story notes that the expansion had already been deemed worthy of release last month by China’s General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP). Chinese World of Warcraft operator Net Ease said it would soon release a formal announcement about Wrath of the Lich King, with company spokesperson Liddy Li stating, “We have always been preparing for its release, but there has been no formal announcement yet.”

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MS Still Lobbying to Sell Consoles in China

August 9, 2010 -

While Microsoft’s Xbox 360 is made in China, it still isn’t available for legal purchase there, nor is Sony’s PlayStation 3 or Nintendo’s Wii, but the Redmond, Washington-based company isn’t giving up hope.

Microsoft executive Zhang Yaqin told the Shanghai Daily (subscription only) that the company still hopes to receive approval to sell the 360 in China, but that “… it all depends on the government.” There’s still no set timetable for launch and the issue involves “several government bureaus,” which, of course, only adds multiple layers of bureaucracy.

Last month, Kotaku investigated why game consoles are banned in China. A Niko Partners researcher told the publication, “The government thought that was the best way to protect Chinese youth from wasting their minds on video games, after a parental outcry.”

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Government Backed Chinese Game Con Boasts "Columns of Girls"

August 4, 2010 -

While a ban that outlaws titillating Internet-based ads for online games went into effect in China on August 1, the edict had no impact on sexy promotions at a recently completed Chinese game expo.

The China Digital Entertainment Expo & Conference, known as ChinaJoy, ran from July 29 through August 1 and is backed by a slew of Chinese government agencies, including the General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP), the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Industrial and Information Technology and the National Copyright Bureau.

The involvement of so many government entities did little to hinder the employment of “columns of Chinese girls in white boots and miniskirts,” at the show, according to a story on Canada.com. The website described some of the action:

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Chinese MMO Creator Buys into TV & Film Businesses

July 29, 2010 -

Beijing-based Perfect World Co. Ltd., an online game operator and developer with titles such as Legend of Martial Arts, Perfect World, Chi Bi and Hot Dance Party, has made investments into two fellow Chinese media companies.

Perfect World will dump 110 million yuan (approximately $16.2 million U.S.) into Beijing Xinbaoyuan Movie & TV Investment Co., Ltd. and an additional 82.3 million yuan (approximately $12.1 million U.S.) into Shanghai Baohong Entertainment and Media Co., Ltd. Both investments were described as majority stakes for the game company.

Both Xinbaoyuan and Baohong—headed up by “renowned” director Zhao Baogang—were labeled as “engaged in the film and television program production and distribution business.” Xinbaoyuan also operates an entertainment agency business, representing over 20 Chinese celebrities.

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China Caves, Promises to Open Entertainment Market by 2011

July 27, 2010 -

Finally reacting to a World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling from last year, which denied its attempt to limit foreign media imports in order to protect “public morals,” China has now acquiesced to opening its entertainment goods market by March 19, 2011.

A Reuters story noted that the WTO did not question the right of Chinese officials to censor content, but argued that they “could not use censorship to justify illegal trade barriers,” an argument which the WTO now appears to have won. It was previously stated that that the removal of Chinese restrictions to import would, “be a boon to Western makers of movies, music and video games who currently face extra costs and obstructions to distribute in China.”

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Chinese Game Offers Inflatable Doll as Award

July 8, 2010 -

Just as China attempts to clean up the image and operations of its online game operators, one online game appears to be offering an inflatable doll as a grand prize.

Via SooToo.com (translated) we learn about the bizarre offering (pictured) being dangled in front of players of the game called War Hero Online (or perhaps it’s called God of War Undefeated). No amount of searching or translation could offer any clues on what the player would have to accomplish in order to win such a prize.

If you were interested in the history of inflatable dolls, the SooToo article kindly provides some background on that subject as well.


Via MicGadget

4 comments

China Bans "Vulgar" Game Adverts

July 8, 2010 -

China’s Ministry of Culture has grown weary of online game companies using vulgar, violent or profane tactics in order to lure consumers to purchase their titles, so it has banned the practice.

The BBC reports that, beginning next month, Chinese officials will be able to force website owners to delete any vulgar content employed in online promotions. Supposedly, one model named Shou Shou (pictured), who was recently embroiled in a sex video controversy, was asked to promote a role-playing game while another unnamed Japanese adult film star was being used to draw attention to the Game Warrior OL.

 “Social commentators” worried that the practice, though not illegal at the time, could “undermine the public's morals. “

The BBC added that, “The new policy has been covered widely in the state-controlled media and on websites here, accompanied of course by photos of the same scantily clad models who have upset the bureaucrats.” Who are we to break ranks?

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Why Are So Many Chinese Fanatic Online Gamers?

June 30, 2010 -

As part of a bid to understand why so many Chinese gamers are obsessed with online games, a “preliminary” study was conducted with hopes that the findings could assist in the prevention and treatment of those afflicted.

Researchers Wei Peng and Ming Liu began by defining online gaming dependency as “a psychological state characterized by psychological discomfort experienced by online gamers when they are unable to play online games as they wish.”

The study (PDF) sampled 166 Chinese online gamers, who, on average, had been playing online games for around six years. On a normal weekday, those queried averaged 3.06 hours in-game, a figure that shot up to 5 hours per weekend day.

The main contributing factors to online gaming dependency, according to the researchers, were:

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China Moves to Protect Young Online Gamers

June 22, 2010 -

Beginning August 1, online game operators in China will be forced to take a series of steps to protect online gamers under the age of 18 from inappropriate content and selling or buying items using virtual currency.

According to the Xinhua News Agency, online games created for minors will have to lose any content that would lead to “imitation of behavior that violates social morals and the law.” The regulations deal with content that is horrifying, cruel or otherwise unwholesome, specifically any portrayals of “pornography, cults, superstitions, gambling and violence.”

The virtual currency ban was said to be made possible by a new rule that online game players must register game accounts using their real name.

Gaming operators were also told to “develop techniques that would limit the gaming time of minors in order to prevent addiction, though without specifying what kinds of techniques and a permissible gaming time.”

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Not Quite the Great Escape for Chinese Internet Addicts

June 8, 2010 -

Fourteen patients from the Huai’an Internet Addiction Treatment Centre in China decided they had enough and tied an instructor to a bed in order to make their escape from the facility.

The group, which ranged in age from 15 to 22, grabbed a taxi to a nearby town, but their similar garb, and lack of funds, raised the suspicion of their driver, who took them directly to a police station. All the escapees were then quickly returned to the treatment center, according to a story on the Telegraph.

One escapee’s mom broke down in tears at the police station, recounting a story in which her son played online games for 28 hours straight.

The facility makes its charges go to bed at 9:30 PM and requires them to partake in two hours of physical activity per day, as well as take mandatory courses in calligraphy and Chinese philosophy.

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NY AG Investigates Apple Store Discrimination Claims

June 7, 2010 -

New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo is looking into claims that several Apple stores in New York City discriminated against Asian customers trying to buy iPads prior to the system's launch in other regions outside the United States.

According to Politico, a Queens Assemblywoman tipped off the AG's Civil Rights Bureau after her constituents complained about being a asked series of unusual questions while trying to purchase multiple iPads. The inference is that Apple Store workers seemed suspicious of these purchases and - perhaps - suspected that some were being sent to China. Keep in mind that this allegedly all took place in early May before the iPad was available outside the United States. The stores where this happened were the flagship stores in Soho and on 14th Street in Manhattan.

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Chinese Anti-Drug Campaign Leverages Game Operators

June 2, 2010 -

The Chinese government is calling on the sizeable network of game operators within its borders for assistance with an anti-drug campaign.

Over 50 online game operators, including the likes of Shanda Entertainment and Giant Online, have said they will take part in a competition to create anti-drug public service advertisements at their own expense. The consortium was put together by Shanghai’s anti-drug commission, according to a story on China.org.cn.

The PSA’s judged to be best will eventually be shown on the city’s mobile TV network and in Internet cafes.

Of China’s 30 million online gamers, “most” were billed as being men, under the age of 35, which coincides with numbers estimating that 75 percent of all new drug users in Shanghai are people under 35. Xu Chuan, an “official” from the Shanghai anti-drug commission, noted, “Online gamers and drug users have similar demographic characteristics in most of the cases."

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Games Suspended as China Prepares to Mourn Quake Victims

April 20, 2010 -

The Chinese government has declared April 21, 2010 as a day of mourning for victims of the April 14 Yushu Earthquake which reportedly killed over 2,000 people and injured more than 12,000.

The Ministry of Culture, in addition to ordering all flags lowered to half-mast, has also issued a suspension  for all public entertainment activities, including videogames. Provision number three of a government issued decree (translated) orders that all cultural and entertainment venues in the China suspend the entertainment activities.

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Chinese MSFT Supplier Under Fire for Worker Conditions

April 19, 2010 -

A Chinese factory that provides computer parts and Xbox 360 controllers to Microsoft, and other U.S. companies, has seen the conditions of its workers scrutinized in a scathing report issued by The National Labor Committee (NLC).

The NLC report focused on the KYE Factory in Dongguan City, Guangdong and offered a laundry list of complaints. Among them, workers earn an average of 65 cents an hour (52 cents per hour after deducting for food), workers average 68 hours of work per week, and that workers are prohibited from “talking, listening to music or using the bathroom” during working hours.

Additionally, the factory was said to have a preference for hiring 18 to 25 year old women, as “they are easier to discipline and control,” and also hires “work-study students,” or 16 and 17 year olds who work mandatory 15-hour shifts six or seven days per week.  Workers also share lodging in “primitive” dorm rooms that house up to 14 people.

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Numbers Game: China’s The9 Invests in Red 5 Studios

March 22, 2010 -

Chinese game developer and operator The9 Limited has entered into an agreement with U.S. online game developer Red 5 Studios that will see the former acquire a “majority interest” in the latter for approximately $20.0 million.

The9 previously operated World of Warcraft in China, before losing the WOW license to its Chinese rival NetEase. The9 still operates games such as FIFA Online 2 for Electronic Arts, in addition to its own games, such as World of Fighter and Atlantica. In its most recently reported quarter, The9 reported a 94.0 percent decrease in revenues to approximately $3.7 million U.S., versus the same period from a year earlier. It cited the loss of its WOW license, which expired on June 7, 2009, as the main reason for the drop.

Given that Red 5 is made up of former executives and game developers from WOW-creator Blizzard Entertainment, the deal seems to make a lot of sense, at least on paper. Red5, however, says that it “can’t tell you" what it's working on.

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CS Hacker Stabbed in Brain

March 22, 2010 -

A 17-year old gamer playing Counter-Strike in a Jilin, China net café was accused of wall hacking and, following an argument with his accusers, ended up being stabbed in the skull by with a 12-inch long knife.

Hot Blooded Gaming has the story of the incident, which, in turn, is taken from a Sankaku Complex translation of a Chinese blog. The 17-year old stabbing victim retained consciousness and was rushed to the hospital, where it’s reported that after hours of surgery, the knife was removed and the boy appeared to be recovering. Doctors said that the rusty knife missed major arteries, though the boy was placed under observation due to possible complications from the rust on the knife.

 The café in question was apparently quite liberal in requiring IDs for entry, making it popular with local youth.

96 comments | Read more

Proposed Chinese Internet Café Ban Draws Hacker Fury

March 4, 2010 -

An advisor to the Chinese government who proposed a nationwide ban of private Internet cafés provoked hackers into defacing the websites of her business.

Yan Ki, a member of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), suggested the ban in order to combat a host of social problems she blames on the cafés. Yan said that the Internet-enabled hangouts promoted truancy, videogame addiction and pornography, reports The Telegraph.

Yan was quoted as saying:

Many serious problems are linked to internet cafés and businesspeople usually ignore their social responsibilities. Desperate diseases must have drastic cures, which is to ban them all.

Yan, described as a “prominent business woman,” then saw the website for her chain of restaurants hacked, with links deleted and messages posted that mocked her perceived self-importance.

The CPCC is made up of 2,374 members and is described as “an advisory body.” The Telegraph wrote that Yan’s suggestions “stand no chance of being adopted.”

15 comments

NetEase Granted Burning Crusade License

February 16, 2010 -

Following a prolonged battle and a series of false-starts, China’s General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP) has finally given the official go-ahead for NetEase to operate the world of Warcraft expansion The Burning Crusade.

In granting the license needed to operate the game, GAPP said that NetEase had “taken necessary corrective measures." The decision came down on Friday wrote Digital East Asia. GAPP had previously suspended NetEase’s permit over what it termed “gross violations” of regulations.

In related news, China Tech News offers word of a new Chinese initiative spearheaded by game operators that will educate parents on how to best oversee their children’s online game activities.  Game operators Wanmei.com, Tencent, Shanda, Netease, Changyou and Giant Interactive are particpiants in the program, which will provide a variety of support materials for parents and also provide the means for parents to suspend or cancel their children’s accounts.

Digital East Asia also shed light on a series of YouTube videos (pictured) that lampoon the World of Warcraft Chinese debacle and use the situation to provide commentary on the rigid state of Chinese censors. The Wall Street Journal said about the video, “…its subtext is a broad, biting allegory of the fight against government Internet controls, peppered with allusions to a list of real-world conflicts in China over the past year.”

Part 1, with English subtitles, can be found here.

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Andrew EisenAs it happens, Chinatown Wars is the only GTA game I've played.04/19/2014 - 10:43am
Papa MidnightWith GTA5 (to date) failing to even provide indication of a PC release, I'm realising that this might be the first GTA game that I have not played (outside of Chinatown Wars) since the series inception.04/19/2014 - 8:14am
IanCSo im guessing a bunch of edutainment games, which a lot of people elsewhere are going gaga over, dot count as classics? Okay. If you don't mind me, i have a sudden urge to play Putt Putt....04/19/2014 - 6:15am
MaskedPixelantehttp://www.joystiq.com/2014/04/18/playstation-99-cent-sale-discounts-tokyo-jungle-super-stardust/ Weekend long PSN flash sale. So much stuff is 99 cents for the rest of the weekend.04/18/2014 - 5:59pm
Adam802http://www.polygon.com/2014/4/18/5627928/newtown-video-game-addiction-forum04/18/2014 - 4:14pm
Matthew Wilsonit is a video talking about why certain games/products/consoles do well, and others do not. he back it up with solid research.04/18/2014 - 3:56pm
Andrew EisenI'm not keen on blind links. What is it?04/18/2014 - 3:45pm
Matthew Wilsonthis is worth a whatch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyXcr6sDRtw&list=PL35FE5C4B157509C904/18/2014 - 3:43pm
MaskedPixelanteNumber 3: Night Dive was brought to the attention of the public by a massive game recovery, and yet most of their released catalogue consists of games that other people did the hard work of getting re-released.04/17/2014 - 8:46pm
MaskedPixelanteNumber 2: If Humongous Entertainment wanted their stuff on Steam, why didn't they talk to their parent company, which does have a number of games published on Steam?04/17/2014 - 8:45pm
MaskedPixelanteNumber 1: When Night Dive spent the better part of a year teasing the return of true classics, having their big content dump be edutainment is kind of a kick in the stomach.04/17/2014 - 8:44pm
Matthew Wilsonhttp://www.giantbomb.com/articles/jeff-gerstmann-heads-to-new-york-takes-questions/1100-4900/ He talks about the future games press and the games industry. It is worth your time even though it is a bit long, and stay for the QA. There are some good QA04/17/2014 - 5:28pm
IanCErm so they shouldn't sell edutainment at all? Why?04/17/2014 - 4:42pm
MaskedPixelanteNot that linkable, go onto Steam and there's stuff like Pajama Sam on the front-page, courtesy of Night Dive.04/17/2014 - 4:13pm
Andrew EisenOkay, again, please, please, PLEASE get in a habit of linking to whatever you're talking about.04/17/2014 - 4:05pm
MaskedPixelanteAnother round of Night Dive teasing and promising turns out to be stupid edutainment games. Thanks for wasting all our time, guys. See you never.04/17/2014 - 3:44pm
Matthew WilsonAgain the consequences were not only foreseeable, but very likely. anyone who understood supply demand curvs knew that was going to happen. SF has been a econ/trade hub for the last hundred years.04/17/2014 - 2:45pm
Andrew EisenMixedPixelante - Would you like to expand on that?04/17/2014 - 2:43pm
MaskedPixelanteWell, I am officially done with Night Dive Studios. Unless they can bring something worthwhile back, I'm never buying another game from them.04/17/2014 - 2:29pm
PHX Corphttp://www.msnbc.com/ronan-farrow/watch/video-games-continue-to-break-the-mold-229561923638 Ronan Farrow Daily on Video games breaking the mold04/17/2014 - 2:13pm
 

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