Codemasters Gives Refunds to Customers Who Bought 'Colin McRae Rally' on Steam

August 6, 2014 - GamePolitics Staff

Codemasters has decided to offers refunds for Colin McRae Rally after negative reviews on Steam. The general complaint among consumers who purchased the game? They say were led to believe it was a high definition remake of the 1998 original; instead they ended up buying a port of the mobile game released by Codemasters last year with touched up graphics and audio.

Following a bunch of negative reviews, Codemasters decided that it would offer dissatisfied customers a refund and update the Colin McRae Rally product page on Steam to better reflect the product.

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Report: Bodycount Studio set to Close

September 14, 2011 -

The developers behind Bodycount are being shut down by parent company Codemasters, or at least that is what it is "proposing." Confirming the news with Computer & Videogames, a company representative said that, while it is "proposing" shutting down the Guildford, England development facility, it will be expanding its "on-campus studios in Warwickshire (DiRT, GRID, F1 Online, Central Technology/EGO)."

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Three Million DiRT 3 Game Vouchers Stolen by Hackers

September 7, 2011 -

Codemasters and AMD have confirmed that over three million digital vouchers for Steam have been stolen for DiRT 3. According to a report from Industry Gamers (citing a Steam forum post), hackers used an .htaccess exploit that allowed them to gain access to an .sql database containing the codes. Those codes were meant to be used for a future AMD graphics card promotion.

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Codemasters CEO: I Don't Like DRM

July 16, 2010 -

Codemasters CEO Rod Cousens says that he is not a fan of digital rights management but his ideas on how to fight piracy are just as complicated as any DRM scheme cooked up by publishers like Ubisoft and EA. Cousens suggests that the game industry sell parts of games in a retail box, with the rest of the content unlocked via micro-payments. As he sees it, even if the first part of the game is pirated, those that don't pay for it will never get to enjoy the complete experience.

But one of the problems with such a solution is that it would require a reduced price at retail for products using this feature because it would only be a partial experience. Plus it it is tough to continually monetize games when they aren’t very good in the first place.. Still, at least Cousens is thinking outside the box. Here's what he told C&VG:

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UK Consumer Group Files Complaint Against Law Firm Which Targeted Game File Sharers

December 10, 2008 -

A British law firm which targets consumers who allegedly share games and movies via the Internet has itself been targeted by the UK's largest consumer advocacy organization.

Zeropaid reports that consumer group Which? filed a complaint against law firm Davenport Lyons with the UK's Solicitors Regulatory Authority. As GamePolitics reported in August, Davenport Lyons aggressively targeted alleged file sharers on behalf of five UK game publishers. From Zeropaid's coverage:

The alleged file-sharers have received letters from the law firm demanding payment of £500 ($773 USD) compensation for copyright infringement, but many, most notably a non-gaming elderly couple, have been wrongly accused.

A recent Which? Computing investigation found that while working with games firm Atari, Davenport Lyons wrongly accused a Scottish couple, aged 54 and 66, of infringing copyright of a game ‘Race O7’. Since then, Atari has severed ties with the law firm. But Which? Computing has evidence from people who, after repeated letters from Davenport Lyons, have been scared into paying compensation for something they say they did not do.

The Which? complaint charges, among other things, that Davenport Lyons' letters to alleged file sharers misstate copyright law, ignore evidence of innocence, and increase the amount demanded over time.

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Atari Pulls Out of UK File-Sharing Lawsuits

December 3, 2008 -

Atari is no longer chasing file-sharers in the UK.

In August GamePolitics reported that five British publishers, most notaby Codemasters and Atari, were filing lawsuits against suspected P2P game uploaders. In one case, an unemployed immigrant mother of two, Isabella Barwinska, was ordered to pay £16,086 (roughly $30,000) for sharing a pinball game.

But a little sleuthing by gamesindustry.biz showed that the law firm employed by the publishers was a sleazy outfit, indeed. The story got even uglier when a pair of older, non-gaming couples were wrongly targeted for sharing games and, more recently, a Nazi porn movie.

Now, P2P advocacy site ZeroPaid reports that Atari has decided that waging war on consumers is bad business:

The lawsuit [against the older couple] was quickly dropped without comment by Atari, but the bad publicity still lingered and called into question the effectiveness of [law firm] Davenport Lyons' tactics.

Now it seems that Atari has decided to part ways with Davenport Lyons altogether, though it hasn't sworn off targeting file-sharers altogether.

Atari's legal department penned an email to UK website The Register, saying, "In relation to file-sharing, our position is that we always retain and reserve the right to protect our intellectual property from illegal copying and piracy. Whilst we are no longer working with Davenport Lyons, we continue to work with legal advisers to protect our rights."

GP: It's good to see that Phil Harrison has Atari focused on its future and not this kind of anti-consumer nonsense.

Is Codemasters the Latest Publisher to Bail on the ESA?

October 9, 2008 -

And then there were 22...

When 2008 began, the Entertainment Software Association, the lobbying group which represents U.S. video game publishers, had 28 member companies. Several well-publicized departures, however, reduced its ranks to 23 companies by the time that E3 rolled around in July.

A glance at current ESA membership reveals that prominent British game publisher Codemasters is no longer listed as part of the organization.

While there has been no announcement from the ESA, Codemasters' departure must be a fairly recent development. The publisher of the Operation Flashpoint and Colin McRae Rally series was officially reported to be an ESA member as recently as E3. An ESA booklet, Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry, distributed at the show, lists the firm as a member on page 12.

Codemasters thus apparently becomes the sixth publisher to leave the ESA since May, following Activision, Vivendi, LucasArts, id, and Crave out the door.

We have a request in to the ESA for comment.

GP: There has been speculation for some time that additional member companies might leave the ESA after E3. Current global economic conditions certainly can't be helpful to the ESA in its efforts to retain members.

UPDATE: The ESA has confirmed that Codemasters has left its membership ranks. A statement from Senior Vice President of Communications and Research Rich Taylor this morning says:

We can confirm that Codemasters has decided not to renew its ESA membership.  We respect Codemasters’ decision and look forward to continuing to work with them on issues of mutual interest.

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Andrew EisenWhat I find most amazing is the fact that Yiannoppoulos's evidence doesn't in any way support his claim. And I still fail to see the lack of ethics in discussing the ethics surrounding public interest vs. personal privacy.09/19/2014 - 4:13pm
Andrew EisenOh yeah, some outlets sensationalize things (especially with the chosen headline). No argument there. As far as gender issues not being widespread? I'm inclined to disagree but I suppose it depends on what specifically you're talking about.09/19/2014 - 3:43pm
SleakerI think I've been qualitatively informed by those Factual Femenist videos that there isn't reallly a widespread gender issue, and that there are select news outlets that try to sensationalize things.09/19/2014 - 3:37pm
james_fudgeI'm just going to leave this here before someone else does:http://yiannopoulos.net/2014/09/19/gamejournopros-zoe-quinn-email-dump/09/19/2014 - 3:21pm
NeenekoI have met some real jerks and slimeballs in gender activism, but when I hear the idea that there are many 'not nice' people it comes across as code for 'uppity people who do not know their place'.09/19/2014 - 12:10pm
Andrew EisenKrono - Many of the people pushing gender issues aren't nice people? I'm sure not everyone's a sweatheart but so far, everyone I've seen with such a critique had absolutely nothing to back them up.09/19/2014 - 10:46am
InfophileI think there's a qualitative difference between a site and a hashtag though. GP can ban anyone from commenting, so they can have the image they want. But anyone can use any hashtag and try to poison it. Granted, that hasn't happened to the other one yet09/19/2014 - 10:13am
E. Zachary KnightKrono, your comparison to GP does not work. We do not need to get rid of GP, because no one associates GP with trolls and abuse. The same can't be said for gamergate.09/19/2014 - 10:09am
Krono@Michael You don't remember the "other hashtag" because no one actually uses it. We're talking 836,983 uses of #gamergate over it's lifetime, and 8,119 for the "alternative". 47,129 uses on the 18th vs 41. With #notyourshield at 140,133 uses & 5,209 uses09/19/2014 - 9:48am
Kronoresearch it. Changing tags to get away from trolls would be like wiping GamePolitics and restarting under a new name to get away from people calling Jack Thompson a filthy names in the comments section.09/19/2014 - 9:35am
Sleaker@quiknkold - seems like all that page is is a bunch of random developer opinions and rumors that we're supposedto do what with?09/19/2014 - 9:31am
Kronoas an opportunity to push back against them. It's one of the things muddling the issue. @conster A new hashtag would do nothing to improve anything. Trolls will simply follow to the new hashtag, and it will confuse the issue for anyone attempting to09/19/2014 - 9:25am
Krono@Andrew aaah. Yes, I'm sure there's some of that. Part of the problem is many of the people pushing gender issues are not very nice people. Basically the latest incarnation of moralists we've seen in the past couple decades. Naturually some will take this09/19/2014 - 9:23am
quiknkoldhttp://www.nichegamer.net/2014/09/real-gamedevs-sound-off-regarding-the-gamergate-controversy/09/19/2014 - 8:35am
MaskedPixelanteMeanwhile, in news that actually DOES matter, Scotland voted "NO" to Scottish independance.09/19/2014 - 8:20am
ConsterSeriously? "We shouldn't make a new hashtag - it's better to associate ourselves with psychos than to decrease our visibility"?09/19/2014 - 7:54am
Michael ChandraI forget what it is exactly, but there already is another hashtag that some use, exactly to separate themselves from the abusive behaviour. So don't bother lying to me.09/19/2014 - 7:06am
quiknkold2 to 3 or more09/19/2014 - 6:53am
quiknkoldMichael Chandra : I'll say this. The only reason they havent used another hashtag is because it would look like a form of dividing the arguement. Using another Hashtag has come up, and they feel like if they made a new hashtag, it'll split the debate from09/19/2014 - 6:53am
Michael ChandraYou want a debate? Build a wall between you and the poisoned well. Make clear you despise it, despise the behaviour. Then get into the other issues you are troubled with, and don't say a single word again about the poisoned well.09/19/2014 - 3:46am
 

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